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Publication numberUS3775606 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 27, 1973
Filing dateJan 7, 1972
Priority dateJan 7, 1972
Publication numberUS 3775606 A, US 3775606A, US-A-3775606, US3775606 A, US3775606A
InventorsBazell S, Goldberg E, Ostensen R
Original AssigneeMedical Prod Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fiber-optic light console
US 3775606 A
Abstract
An improved light console for fiber-optic light cables which carry devices, such as surgical devices to be illuminated by the light source. The improved light source includes a dual illumination system which permits simultaneous use of two cables with the same console, or switching from one cable to another in the event of failure of one light source during surgical operation. In addition, the improved light console employs light and heat shielding means surrounding each of the light sources. The shielding means functions as a heat sink which may be air-cooled to protect the front portion of the console thereby preventing it from becoming too hot to touch, a serious defect in prior art consoles. The console also includes means for controlling the light intensity for each of the light sources independent of separate color temperature controls. One embodiment of the light intensity means includes self-indexed, diaphragm or stop-type assembly which can vary the light intensity from 0 - 100 percent of output in any preselected number of discreet stages, typically 0, 25, 50 and 100 percent of maximum. Each light is separately switched independently of the power. The light console is air-cooled by a fan-type motor, and contains standard circuitry and fusing.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [1 1 Bazell et al.

[111 3,775,606 [451 Nov. 27, 1973 FIBER-OPTIC LIGHT CONSOLE [75 Inventors: Seymour Bazell, Skokie', Ralph G. Ostensen, Morton Grove; Edward M. Goldberg, Glencoe, all of 111.

[73] Assignee: Medical Products Corporation,

Skokie, Ill.

[22] Filed: Jan. 7, 1972 [21] App]. No.: 216,035

[52] US. Cl 240/47, 240/1 EL, 240/41.15, 240/46.01, 350/96 B [51] Int. Cl. F2lv 29/00 [58] Field of Search 240/47, 1 EL, 41 R, 240/4l.15, 46.51, 46.13, 46.01; 350/96 B [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,735,929 2/1956 Erhardt et a1 240/46.l3 3,382,353 5/1968 Wappler 240/1 EL 3,204,091 8/1965 Baracket 240/46.5l X 3,596,083 7/1971 Lovering 240/1 EL Primary ExaminerRichard L. Moses Attorney-Molinare, Allegretti, Newitt [57 ABSTRACT An improved light console for fiber-optic light cables which carry devices, such as surgical devices to be illuminated by the light source. The improved light source includes a dual illumination system which permits simultaneous use of two cables with the same console, or switching from one cable to another in the event of failure of one light source during surgical operation. In addition, the improved light console employs light and heat shielding means surrounding each of the light sources. The shielding means functions as a heat sink which may be air-cooled to protect the front portion of the console thereby preventing it from becoming too hot to touch, a serious defect in prior art consoles. The console also includes means for controlling the light intensity for each ofthe light sources independent of separate color temperature controls. One embodiment of the light intensity means includes self-indexed, diaphragm or stop-type assembly which can vary the light intensity from 0 100 percent of output in any preselected number of discreet stages, typically 0, 25, 50 and 100 percent of maximum. Each light is separately switched independently of i the power. The light console is air-cooled by a fan-type motor, and contains standard circuitry and fusing.

10 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures PAIENI nnv 2 7 ma SHEEI 1 OF 2 PAIENTEDnnvzmva saw 2 or 2 FIBER-OPTIC LIGHT CONSOLE ronments where high intensity, small beams of light-are used for diagnostic or surgical purposes. The improved console has a dual light source, heat and light absorbingshrouds, and a light intensity means for control of the light source.

The use of fiber-optics in medicine has grown significantly in the last several years. In practice, a light source bears upon one end of a fiber-optic light cable which in turn transmits the light to the other end to illuminate surgical or diagnostic devices which are used either in close quarters or internally in medical procedures. These cables are typically on the order of 6 feet long and have a one-sixteenth one-half inch diameter. One end of the cable is adapted by a bayonet-type of fitting to be inserted into a fiber-optic light console while the opposite end may have various types of adaptors suited to the specific surgical or diagnostic instrument being used. These cables are typically flexible, thus permitting ease and flexibility of directing the light. This invention does not concern itself with improvements in the fiber-optic light cable, but rather the console into which such cables are plugged, and which operate as a source for the light.

The light supply for these fiber-optic instruments has typically been a small, powerful incandescent-type lamp which is located several feet from the instrument to be illuminated, with the light being piped from thislight source to the instrument via the flexible fiberoptic cable as described above. One of the most serious problems in the present devices is that the heavy filament, tungsten-halogen bulbs presently used have a color temperature on the order of 3,100 Kelvin when used with standard 110 volt, non-transformed power input. The light normally impinges on the backside of the female bayonet aperture fitting, which in turn is mounted in the wall of the console. The light impinging on the wall surface and the bayonet fitting causes the entire cabinet, over a period of time, to become too hot to touch. Thus, for example when one light may burn out, and it is necessary to open the console to replace the light bulb, heavy gloves must be used and great care must be taken so that the operator is not burned, or inadvertently drops either the cable or the new bulb causing damage. This changing operation necessarily takes time which may prove a serious detriment in surgical operations where time is of the essence.

Also, present devices control the level of illumination by use of a voltage controller which reduces the input voltage to the lamp filament. However, this means of controlling the light is not the most desirable because when the voltage is reduced on an incandescent lamp, the color temperature of the lamp is reduced and the light turns from incandescent-white to a red-yellow color of the visible spectrum. Thus at the lower light levels, the instruments typically produce a reddishorange light which makes visualizing in anatomical structures and diseases extremely difficult. For example, a red lesion on pink tissues appears grayish. It is thus difficult to discern the exact color of the lesion with respect to background tissue. Since color is extremely important in diagnostic work; the value of the instrument is severly limited. In addition, the contours of the lesions become more difficult to discern from the structure of the background.

In addition, some types of devices employ either a squirrel cage -or centrifugal type of fan for internal cooling by blowing astream of air across the light bulb and against'the interior walls of the console. However, such types of fans suffer from the disadvantage of not also self-cooling their own motor. Under the intense heat conditions the motors are more'subject to failure during operation, which failure would cause burnout of the light bulb, and/or rendering. the instrument so hot as to cause failure of electrical or mechanical components, in addition to it being to hot to handle.

THE INVENTION Objects It is an object of this invention to providean improved fiber-optic light console which overcomes the disadvantages of prior art types of consoles.

It is another object of this invention to provide'a fiber-optic light console which has aplurality of light sources which mayoperate simultaneously 'without overheating of the console.

It is still another object of this invention toprovide' a fiber-optic light console assembly in whichboth'color temperature and light intensity may be controlled independently for each of the light-cable sources.

It is another object of this invention to provide an improved fiber-optic light console having means to reduce the surface temperature of the control panel'of the console so that it may be handled during operation without danger of burning the operator.

It is still another object of this invention to provide special shroud means for the light sources which shield the operating control panel surfaces of the console from direct impingement of the light, thus cooling those surfaces.

It is another object of this invention to provide heat sink means for absorbing the unused light in the console thuspermitting the console to operate at a lower temperature.

It is another object of this invention to provide improved fiber-optic light console which has greater flexibility in its utility, and is a safe instrument from the point of view of a fire hazard in ether or alcohol-vapor containing atmospheres often used in surgical situations.

Still further and other objects of this invention will be evident from the following detailed description.

SUMMARY AND FIGURES This invention is characterized by a special shroud or shielding means surrounding each light source and spaced away from the front panel of the instrument, which shroud not only shields the front control panel and other operating surfaces of the console, but also acts as a heat sink for absorbing and dissipating the heat values from the light source. The shroud is adapted to be cooled by ambient exterior air from a self-cooling forced air fan. In addition, in combination with the shroud, light intensity control means are provided which act to permit individual control of light amount anywhere from 0 through percent of the maximum light available from the light source. The light intensity means in one embodiment includes a plate-type stop or diaphragm which is self-indexed and non-backlash. In one embodiment the plate is provided with four positions, of which only three have apertures, thus providing light intensity values off), 25, 50 and 100 percent of the total light available. The light intensity stop means is also adapted to be cooled by the flow of air circulating in the interior of the instrument.

The following detailed description of the invention is made with reference to the drawings in which:

FIG. I. is a perspective view of the exterior of the console showing the fiber-optic cables plugged there into in operating position.

FIG. 2 shows the front control panel portion of the console partly opened thereby illustrating the light shrouds and their manner of enclosing the entire light reflector surface.

FIG. 3 is a section view of the front control panel taken along the line 33 in FIG. 2 and illustrates the shroud and light intensity stop means.

FIG. 4 is a top section view taken along the line 4-4 in FIG. 1 and illustrates the relationship of the elements of the light console, and particularly the shroud and light intensity stop means of this invention.

FIG. 5 is a side section view taken along the line 5-5 in FIG. 4 and further illustrates the arrangement of the assemblies on the interior of the console.

In the following detailed description, it should be understood that the specific embodiments discussed are meant as illustrative and not limiting of the scope of the invention.

Turning now to FIG. I, fiber-optic light console I has a front control panel portion 2, releasably secured by latch means 3 to housing 4. Handle 5 is conveniently provided for carrying of the console. The housing also provides for entry of power cord 6, and exhausting of cooling air through side Iouvers 7.

The control panel portion 2 provides two female bayonet-type mounting apertures 8 and 9 for plug-in of fiber-optic light cables 10 and/or 11. Main power switch 12 provides for on-off control of the console, while switch 13 controls the left light source associated with cable I0, and switch 14 controls the right light source associated with cable 11.

Knob 15 controls the color temperature rheostat which is continuously variable from a maximum 110 volts, 3,IOO Kelvin down to O. Knobs 16 and 17 oper ate the light intensity control means (shown in more detail below) for their associated fiber-optic cables 10 and 11, respectively. Other control knobs may be positioned on the control panel portion as desired, or the control knobs shown may be positioned elsewhere on the instrument as is convenient.

FIG. 2 shows the fiber-optic cables removed from the bayonet-type mounts 8 and 9, and the control panel portion partly open to reveal the left and right highintensity light sources, 18 and 19 respectively. Associated with the light sources and adapted to fit thereover are special shrouds 20 and 21 respectively. This figure illustrates how the control panel portion of the console may be hinged at the bottom as at 33, and opened by releasing latch 3 and tilting forward the control panel or access to the light sources 18 and 19 for their repair or replacement. The shrouds fit completely over the reflector portion of the light source yet are adapted to provide for opening of the console as shown. In the alternative, the console control panel portion may be hinged at the side or in another convenient place for opening. Still further, the control panel portion 2 need not be hinged, but can be adapted to fit over interior flanges 22, 23 and 24 which are adapted to frictionally engage the interior surface of the control panel portion. The interior flanges may be broken away at the corners. as at 25 to provide ease in fit.

The control frontpanel portion of the device may advantageously have a front louver such as louver 26 adapted to deflect air circulating on the interior of the cabinet backwardly away from the front control panel portion. In the alternative, this louver may be spaced on the top or the bottom of the device, or multiple louvers may be employed.

FIGS. 3, 4 and 5 may be viewed together. FIG. 3 is a plan view of the interior face of the control panel portion taken along the line 3-3 in FIG. 2. Shrouds 20 and 21 are mounted in proper alignment with the high intensity light sources 18 and 19 by means of base bracket 27. The light intensity control stop means 28 and 29, for the left and right lights, respectively, are mounted behind the shrouds 20 and 21. The apertures in the light intensity stop means are positively indexed into proper position by means of position assembly 30 which has depending fingers 31 and 32 which engage the notches such as 33 in each of the stop means to positively align the apertures in the stop means with the focal point of the light source.

Other details of the assembly may be seen in this view with switches 12 through 14 being visible below the shroud base bracket. Hinge means 83 is mounted on the bottom edge of the control panel portion and correspondingly attaches to the bottom of the housing 4 as best seen in FIG. 5. The color temperature rheostat 34 is operated by the knob 15 shown in FIG. 1, and is electrically connected to the high intensity light sources and the on-oft" switch in conventional electric circuitry, not shown.

FIG. 4 shows in more detail the relationship of the housing and the light intensity stop means to the high intensity light sources. The light sources 18 and 19 are mounted on a base bracket 35 for proper alignment with the aperture 36 in the bayonet mount 9 which receives the fiber-optic light cable end. The high intensity light source includes a fixed base portion 37, a removable light bulb holder and reflector 38, bulb 39, and a pivotally mounted spring-type clip 40. The clip 40 may be swung to one side and the bulb holder 38 with its reflector and bulb 39 may be removed by pulling upwardly (in FIG. 5). A new bulb holder, reflector and bulb assembly may then be plugged into the light base 37 and the retaining clip repositioned to insure good contact. The tungsten-halogen bulb is positioned within a dichroic reflector which is of the type which permits transmittal of about percent of the infrared light through the glass of the reflector. Nevertheless, the light spot is extremely hot, and the focal point of the reflector impinges on the end of the fiber-optic light cable bundle which projects relatively flush with the interior opening of the aperture 36 in the bayonet 9. This is shown in FIG. 5 by the dot labeled F. It should be understood that the focal point P is actually a spot on the order of l to 2 centimeters in size so that it illuminates the entire end of the fiber-optic light cable bundle. This is shown by the light path lines from the edge of the reflector directed to the interior end of the bayonet mount 9 as best seen in FIG. 5, and labeled L, L.

The light intensity stop means 28 and 29 in the embodiment shown in the figures is a quarter circle piece of heavy gauge aluminum having a plurality of apertures therethrough, each aperture having a different size as seen by apertures 41, 42 and 43. These apertures are of a predetermined size to cut off a specific predetermined portion of the light impinging on the end of the fiber-optic light cable bundle. As seen in FIG. 5 for example, aperture 42 intercepts a portion of the light cone impinging on the end of the bundle generally at the point F and permits passage through the aperture of only approximately 50 percent of the total available light. Thus the light intensity is selected in a predetermined fashion. Aperture 43 may be sized to permit 100 percent of the end' of the fiber-optic light cable bundle to be exposed to the light source, and conversely opening 41 may permit only 25 percent.

Radially outwardly from the apertures 41 through 43 are a series of stop notches or indexing means 33 which permit accurate positioning of the apertures in the cone of light and in axial alignment with the end of the fiberoptic light cable bundle. In addition, one further notch 44 (see FIG. 3) is provided on the edge of the light intensity stop means. As shown in the embodiment in FIGS. 3'through 5, there is no aperture associated with stop notch 44 and thus 100 percent of the light can be cut off if desired. In the alternative, this blank place in the stop means may be custom drilled to provide whatever percentage of light may be desired by the user.

In operation, the light intensity stop means is positioned by means which includes knob 17 which is journaled upon sleeve 45 as seen in FIG. 4. Shaft 46 is secured to the light intensity stop means 29 and to the knob 17 and is free to rotate in the sleeve 45 upon turning knob 17. Thus by turning the knob, the light intensity stop means may be adjusted and indexed with the end of the fiber-optic light cable bundle to provide the desired illumination.

To prevent override of the light intensity stop means, a pair of depending ears 47 and 48 are provided on each of thelight intensity stop means. The action of the ears can be seen in FIGS. 3 through 5, ear 47 in FIG. 4 being shown in profile and ear 48 being shown in profile in FIG. 5. As best seen in FIG. 5, ear 48 engages the projecting interior end of the bayonet mount 9 and thus prevents override of the light intensity stop means, that is, rotation of the stop means past the position of aperture 43. Similarly, when the stop means 29 (see FIG. 3) is rotated clockwise, car 47 will engage the upper side of the inner end of the mount 9 and prevent override of the stop means.

It should be understood that while the stop means are shown as quarter-circular pieces, they may be made semi-circular or a full circle, and any number of apertures may be provided therethrough to provide any predetermined desired selection of light intensity values impinging on the end of the fiber-optic light cable bundle.

Spaced rearwardly from the light intensity stop means and aligned axially with the high intensity light source are the light shrouds and 21. These shrouds are generally cup-shaped with an aperture 49 in what would be the bottom of the cup. The central axis of the aperture 49 is aligned with the axis of the light bulb holder with its reflector 38. The light passes through the aperture and impinges on the end of the fiber-optic light cable bundle except to the extent light is cut off by the light intensity stop means. FIG. 5 shows the cone of light which is permitted to pass toward the light bundle outlined by the letters L and L. Extraneous light impinges against the interior of the light shroud. Typically, the light shroud is of relatively thin, highly conductive, anodized or otherwise blackened metal. This permits the light to be absorbed by the metal and heat generated by the light dissipated by the air flowing in heat exchange relationship around both the interior and exterior of the light cup from the fan 50 which is mounted at the rear of the housing 4.

In the embodiment shown in FIGS. 3 through 5, one wall of the cup is notched as at 51 to permit clearance by the light base 37 when the control panel portion 2 of the console 1 is closed from the position shown in FIG. 2 to that shown in FIG. 1. Where a different type of light base 37 may be employed which does not project so far forward that it lies on a plane which intersects the reflector portion of the bulb holder 38, the notch may not be required. However, it should be noted that the rearward extent of the shroud cup wall is suffrciently far back to extend rearwardly of the reflector base. This assists in heat dissipation of extrarleous light since the reflector is actually transparent to infrared light, being a dichroic coated glass reflector. Thus reflected light can pass rearwardly through the reflector to a small extent, and is captured by thedarkened walls of the shroud cup assembly. The cup assembly is opened to the rear to permit air from fan 50 to be drawn in from the ambient atmosphere through the grillwork 52 at the rear of the housing 4, from whence it is propelled forwardly into and around the cup. The air picks up heat from the cup, and the shroud cup base bracket 27. The air also passes around the exterior of the cups and impinges upon the from inside face of the control panel 2 and on the light intensity stop plates 28 and 29. This serves to cool the operating elements of the fiber-optic light console, and the heated air passes out the louver 7 in the side walls of the housing and through the side and bottom louvers 26 of the control panel portion of the console.

As noted above, the internal wiring is relatively conventional, and has not been shown in detail for ease of understanding the operation of the improved console. The power is supplied through cord 6 via resettable circuit breaker 53, and is then internally distributed by appropriate wiring to the light sources, the on-off switches, the fan and the color temperature rheostat 34.

In contrast to prior art light consoles, even after two hours of continuous operation the control panel of the light console of this invention is only slightly warm to the touch. In addition, should light of lower intensity be required during the operation, the light intensity can be cut down very simply by rotation of the light intensity control knob. In addition, should the color temperature be required to be changed, the color temperature control knob 15 can also be manipulated to achieve the desired color temperature. In addition, the dual mounted high intensity light sources permits operation of both light sources simultaneously at different light intensities without loss of color. More or fewer light sources may be used.

It should be understood that variations and adaptations can be made in the foregoing description of the embodiments of this invention without departing from the scope thereof. For example, the cable end fitting, within the meaning of the term bayonet-type, includes both the standard bayonet having a pair of small, side projections which key into groves in the mounting assembly, or the spring detent type of bayonet in which springs in the mounting engage groves in the cable end fitting. Likewise, the light intensity amount means could be made larger, or of darkened metal to provide additional or optional shielding. The light intensity apertures may be selected to provide any desired values, for example 10, 33, 66 and 100 percent, and are not limited to the selection of O, 25, 50 and 100 percent. In place of the rheostat, a standard transistorized, continuously variable chopper," such as the type used in home lighting dimmer switches may be used. Particularly useful for the consoles of this invention are choppers capable of handling up to 600 watts power.

We claim:

1. An improved fiber-optic light console comprising in operative combination:

a. a housing, having a control panel portion,

b. means for mounting one end of a fiber-optic light cable in said control panel portion,

0. a high intensity light source having a reflector assembly disposed within said housing so that light from said light source impinges on said end of said fiber-optic light cable,

d. means for shielding said control panel portion from direct impingement thereon of light from said high intensity light source,

e. said shielding means being adapted to pass light therethrough to impinge on said fiber-optic light cable end, and having a shroud disposed between said reflector assembly and the end of said fiberoptic light cable and extending axially rearwardly of said reflector assembly, and

. means for directing ambient air from the exterior of said housing into heat exchange association with said shielding means,

whereby said shielding means absorbs radiant heat from said light source and said console has improved operational life, safety and lower temperature.

2. A console as in claim 1 which includes:

g. means disposed in said housing for controlling the amount of iight impinging on the end of said fiberoptic light cable without affecting the color temperature of said iight.

3. A console as in claim 1 which includes a plurality of light sources.

4. A consoie as in claim 2 wherein said light amount control means includes a plate having an aperture therein, said plate is spaced rearwardly from the end of said end of said fiber-optic light cable, and means for positioning said aperture in axial alignment with said cable end.

5. A console as in claim 4 wherein said positioning means includes means for indexing said aperture in a predetermined position, and spring-biased fingers co operating with said indexing means to provide for positive positioning of said apertures.

6. A console as in claim 5 wherein said plate includes means for maintaining a portion of said plate in the path of said light impinging on said cable end, thereby to prevent override of said plate.

7. A console as in claim 6 wherein said maintaining means includes a portion of said plate adapted to engage a portion of said fiber-optic light cable mounting means.

8. An improved fiber-optic light console comprising in operative combination:

a. a housing, having a control panel portion,

b. means for mounting one end of a fiber-optic light cable in said control panel portion,

c. a high intensity light source disposed within said housing so that light from said light source impinges on said end of said fiber-optic light cable,

d. means disposed in said housing for controlling the amount of light impinging on the end of said fiberoptic light cable without affecting the color temperature of said light,

said light amount control means includes a plate having an aperture therein, said plate is spaced rearwardly from the end of said fiber-optic light cable, and means for positioning said aperture in axial alignment with said cable end,

said positioning means includes means for indexing said aperture in a predetermined position, and spring-biased fingers cooperating with said indexing means to provide for positive positioning of said apertures, and

e. means for directing ambient exterior air into association with the interior surfaces of said housing and said light amount control means thereby to cool said console.

9. A console as in claim 8 wherein said plate includes means for maintaining a portion of said plate in the path of said light impinging on said cable end, thereby to prevent override of said plate.

10. A console as in claim 9 wherein said maintaining means includes a portion of said plate adapted to engage a portion of said fiber-optic light cable mounting

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Classifications
U.S. Classification362/552, 362/235, 362/294, 362/572
International ClassificationF21V29/00, F21V11/00, F21V8/00, F21V29/02, F21V11/08
Cooperative ClassificationF21V29/02, G02B6/0006, F21V11/08
European ClassificationF21V29/02, G02B6/00L4C, F21V11/08