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Publication numberUS3775794 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 4, 1973
Filing dateJan 31, 1973
Priority dateJan 31, 1973
Publication numberUS 3775794 A, US 3775794A, US-A-3775794, US3775794 A, US3775794A
InventorsFisher J
Original AssigneeFisher J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ski boot holder
US 3775794 A
Abstract
A pair of hollow frames for supporting ski or other kinds of boots. The first frame is fitted over the toe end of the ski boots and a wall of a second frame extending through the first frame is moved behind the boots. Both frames extend around the boots. The free end of the second frame forms a handle for carrying the boots.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1191 451 Dec. 4, 1973 Fisher SKI BOOT HOLDER 2,679,937 6/1954 Folster 211 34 Inventor: J D. Fisher, 462 N. o y 3,210,787 10/1965 Allsop l2/120.5

El b tht P 17022 12a 6 own a Primary Examiner-Patr1ck D. Lawson [22] Filed: Jan. 31, 1973 AttorneyThomas Hooker Appl. No.: 328,241

US. Cl 12/1 R, 12/1205, 211/34 Int. Cl A43d 5/00 Field of Search 12/1205, 103, l R;

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS Lang 12 1205 1 ABSTRACT A pair of hollow frames for supporting ski or other kinds of boots. The first frame is fitted over the toe end of the ski boots and a wall of a second frame ex- I tending through the first frame is moved behind the boots. Both frames extend around the boots. The free end of the second frame forms a handle for carrying the boots.

8 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures SKI BOOT HOLDER The invention relates to boot holders and particularly to an improved and inexpensive ski boot holder of the type for carrying ski boots. My boot holder is simpler and less expensive than conventional ski boot holders of the type disclosed in U. S. Pat. No. 3,210,787.

The boots are readily secured in and removed from the holder, which automatically adjusts to hold different sizes of boots. The holder folds flat for storage when not in use to facilitate placing in ski lockers or the like. Because of the simplified construction my ski boot holders may be sold as an accesssory for use during a ski weekend and may be discarded at the completion of skiing.

Other objects and features of the invention will become apparaent as the description proceeds especially when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings illustrating the invention, of which there is one sheet. 2 Q I IN THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view illustrating a pair of boots held by my ski boot holder;

FIG. 2 is the side view of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3.is a perspective view of the ski boot holder of FIG. 1, but with the boots removed; and

FIG. 4 is a partially broken away view illustrating the two frames secured together.

As illustrated in the drawings, the ski boot holder comprises a pair of generally rectangular hollow frame 12 and 14 which are fitted around a pair of ski boots 16 to hold the same together so that the boots may be carried together in a side-by-side position as shown. Frame 12 includes a flat bottom wall 18, a pair of side walls 20, and a cylindrical top wall 22. All of the walls 18, 20 and 22 are straight so that frame 12 is essentially planar. A pair of clips 24 are provided on the upper ends of side walls 20. I

Frame 14 is made up of a flat backing member 26, a pair of flat arcuate side walls 28, and a handle 30. The ends 32 of the handle 30 and the ends 34 of the backing member 26 extend beyond the side walls 28. Ends 32 form trunions engagable with clips 24. Side walls 28 are spaced apart a distance of slightly less than the interior spacing of the side walls 20 of frame 12.

The frames of ski boot holder 10 are assembled by rotating frame 14 relative to frame 12 so that the backing member 26 may be moved through the interior opening of frame 12. Frame 14 is then rotated to the position of FIG. 3 in which member 26 and handle 30 are parallel to the top and bottom members of frame 12. In this position the sides 28 of frame 14 are closely spaced from the sides 20 of frame 12. Projections 32 and 34 engage sides 20 to prevent the frames from separating. The concave surfaces of the sides 28 face top member 22.

With the two frames assembled as in FIG. 3, a pair of ski boots 16 may be positioned in carrier by first raising backing member 26 above the ankle supports of the boots and then fitting the toe portions of the boots into the interior opening of frame 12 until the front of the boot is brought against top 22 of frame 12. With the boots in this position the backing member 26 of frame 14 is moved down in back of the boot ankle supports until it engages the backs of the boots as illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2. Tee boots are carried by grasping handle 30. The soles of the boots are pressed against the flat surface of frame bottom 18. Because of the weight of the boots the cylinderical top member 22 tends to slide along sides 28 toward backing member 26 thereby confining the boot ankle portion closely between flat backing member 26 and top 22. In this way the boots are clasped as they are carried. The relative movement between frames 12 and 14 automatically adjusts the boot holder 10 to accommodate different size ski boots.

When the boots are placed on a support surface the carrier 10 is easily removed by reversing the procedure previously described. With the boots removed, the two frames 12 and 14 may be secured together for storage important feature since skiing resorts usually provide a skier with a limited amount of space for storing articles while on the slopes. Conventional ski boot holders are not as compact as the present ski boot holder when collapsed, as in FIG. 4.

The arcuate sides 28 of frame 14 assures that the handle 20 is positioned above the boots in a convenient location for carrying the boots. Additionally, top wall 22 slides along the arcuate sides toward backing member 26 to confine the tops of the boots therebetween. While arcuate side members may be used in frame 14, the invention is not limited to such arcuate sides. Obviously a ski boot holder of the type disclosed could use straight or other types of sides in frame 14.

Flat members 18 and 26 rest flush against the ski boots and tend to orient the, boots within the holder. The invention need not be limited to the use of flat members, as other types of members could be used in a ski boot holder of the type disclosed.

While I have illustrated and described a preferred embodiment of our invention, it is understood that this is capable of modification, and I therefore do not wish to be limited to the precise details set forth, but desire to avail myself of such changes and alterations as fall within the purview of the following claims.

What I claim as my invention is:

1. A boot holder comprising a pair of hollow frames, the first frame including a bottom adapted to engage the soles of a pair of boots or the like and a frame portion extending around the bottom and joining the ends of the bottom to define an interior opening for receiving the toe portions of such boots, a second frame including a backing side and a second frame portion extending around the backing side and joining the ends thereof to define a second interior opening for receiving the ankle supports of such boots, said second frame portion being fitted through the interior opening of the first frame and engaging the first frame portion with the backing side on one side of the first frame for engagement with the back side of such ankle portions, said second frame portion including a handle located on the other side of the first frame for supporting the boots.

2. A boot holder as in claim 1 wherein the first frame is essentially rectangular and the second frame includes a straight backing side with the handle extending parallel to such'side.

3. A. boot holder as in claim '2 wherein the second frame includes a pair of arcuate sides extending between the backing side and the handle, concave faces of such sides engaging one side of the first frame.

4. A boot holder as in claim 2 including means for removably securing the frames together upon removal of the boots from the holder.

5. A boot holder comprising a first rectangular hollow frame and a second hollow frame; the first frame including a side for supporting the soles of a pair of boots or the like, a pair of side members and a top; the second frame including a backing side engagable with the back of such boots, a pair of sides extending from the backing side through the interior opening of the first frame and engagable with the top of such frame, and a handle joining such sides; whereby upon supporting the boots by said handle the ankle portions are defined between the backing side and said top.

6. A boot holder as in claim 5 wherein the sides of the second frame include concave arcuate surfaces facing said top of the first frame.

7. A boot holder as in claim 5 including clip means for securing the frames together upon removal of the boots.

8. A pair of boots and boot holder comprising two boots in side by side relation, a first holder member surrounding the toe portions of the boots with the boot soles resting upon the member, and a second holder member surrounding the boot ankle supports, engaging the back of the ankle supports and extending through the first boot support member adjacent the tops of the toe portions, the second boot support member including a handle on the part thereof extending through the first boot support member.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1225657 *Jul 29, 1916May 8, 1917Charles J LangShoe-support.
US2679937 *Aug 18, 1952Jun 1, 1954Chris FulsterBoot hanger and carrier
US3210787 *Jul 15, 1964Oct 12, 1965Allsop AutomaticAutomatic boot and shoe tree
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4537436 *Mar 19, 1984Aug 27, 1985Pfortmiller Donald DBoot carrier
US4624496 *Jul 2, 1985Nov 25, 1986Bengtson Rodney LBoot carrier frame
US4683876 *Mar 10, 1986Aug 4, 1987Valley ChangrasOrthopedic guide
US4696504 *Sep 30, 1986Sep 29, 1987Roberts Jr Roland QBoot carrier
US5114017 *Mar 7, 1991May 19, 1992Doyel John SShoe organizer
US6010172 *Dec 21, 1998Jan 4, 2000Comeau; Victor J.In-line skate carrier
US6533127 *Aug 18, 2000Mar 18, 2003Lynk, Inc.Over-door shoe racks
US6637603 *Jul 3, 2002Oct 28, 2003Lynk, Inc.Over-door shoe racks
US6793080 *Jul 3, 2002Sep 21, 2004Lynk, Inc.Over-door shoe racks
US6926157Sep 8, 2003Aug 9, 2005Lynk, Inc.Over-door shoe racks
US6992118Sep 8, 2003Jan 31, 2006Cooper Vision Inc.Ophthalmic lenses and compositions and methods for producing same
US7021475Sep 8, 2003Apr 4, 2006Lynk, Inc.Over-door shoe racks
US7025214Sep 8, 2003Apr 11, 2006Lynk, Inc.Over-door shoe racks
US8291620Jul 16, 2010Oct 23, 2012Laura Aubrey ValaasSki boot sole guard
US8439415Nov 30, 2010May 14, 2013Laura Aubrey ValaasSki boot carrier
US8491011Jan 19, 2011Jul 23, 2013Laura Aubrey ValaasDevice for holding a pair of skis together
Classifications
U.S. Classification12/1.00R, 211/34, 12/120.5, 294/162, 294/164
International ClassificationA43B5/04
Cooperative ClassificationA43B5/0425
European ClassificationA43B5/04D3