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Publication numberUS3775900 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 4, 1973
Filing dateMay 1, 1972
Priority dateMay 1, 1972
Publication numberUS 3775900 A, US 3775900A, US-A-3775900, US3775900 A, US3775900A
InventorsIeda M, Thorn H
Original AssigneeIdeal Toy Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Toy doll
US 3775900 A
Abstract
A toy doll having a torso and a pair of arms includes a selectively operable electric motor mounted in the torso and connected through a transmission to the forearm portion of one of the arms in order to oscillate that forearm portion in a selectable predetermined plane upon actuation of the drive means. The driven forearm is connected to its associated upper arm portion by an articulated joint which is rotatably mounted in the upper arm and drivingly connected to the transmission system so that the upper arm portion remains motionless while the forearm portion is oscillated. The electric motor also is operably connected to the doll's head to oscillate the head from side to side while simultaneously oscillating the forearm in order to simulate human movements while playing a musical instrument or the like.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [1 1 Thorn et al.

[ TOY DOLL [75] Inventors: Herbert Thorn, Flushing; Michael Ieda, Fort Solanga, both of NY.

[73] Assignee: Ideal Toy Corporation, Hollis, N.Y.

[22] Filed: May 1, 1972 [21] App]. No.: 248,996

,[ Dec. 4, 1973 Primary Examiner-Louis G. Mancene Assistant Examiner-J. Q Lever Att0rney-Richard M. Rabkin [5 7 ABSTRACT A toy doll having a torso and a pair of arms includes a selectively operable electric motor mounted in the torso and connected through a transmission to the forearm portion of one of the arms in order to oscillate that forearm portion in a selectable predetermined plane upon actuation of the drive means. The driven forearm is connected to its associated upper arm portion by an articulated joint which is rotatably mounted in the upper arm and drivingly connected to the transmission system so that the upper arm portion remains motionless while the forearm portion is oscillated. The electric motor also is operably connected to the dolls head to oscillate the head from side to side while simultaneously oscillating the forearm in order to simulate human movements while playing a musical instrument or the like.

13 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures PATENTEU DEC 4 1975 SHEET 10F 3 TOY 001.1.

The present invention relates to toy dolls and in particular to motorized dolls which are assembled and driven to simulate human movements and activities.

A number of mechanized toy dolls of the above type have been previously proposed in which one or both of the dolls arm is driven or oscillated in a plane in order to simulate human movements. Such dolls are often utilized in conjunction with toy musical instruments such as simulated guitars, violins, banjos and the like with the oscillation of the dolls arms simulating strumming of the guitar or actuation of the bow for the violin. However, in these types of dolls, such as, for example the dolls shown in US. Pat. No. 1,519,410, the oscillated arm is usually formed in one-piece construction so that the arm is oscillated about the dolls shoulder, with both the upper and forearm portions of the arm being moved to simulate the desired action. Movement of the dolls entire arm in this manner is not realistic in appearance, but rather has a mechanical appearance which does not truly simulate the actual motions of a human playing the instrument. For example, when playing a guitar only the forearm portion of the persons arm normally is moved to produce the strumming action while the upper arm portion remains relatively motionless. Thus, since none of the previously proposed mechanical dolls have the capacity to move only the forearm portions of their arms, they do not closely simulate human movements and therefore are not fully satisfactory.

Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to accurately simulate various human body movements with a mechanized toy doll.

Another object of the present invention is to simulate the movements of a human body while playing a musical instrument such as a guitar or the like.

Yet another object of the present invention is to provide a mechanical toy doll having the capacity to oscillate the forearm portions whereof while the upper arm portions remain motionless, which doll is relatively simple in construction and inexpensive to manufacture.

In accordance with one aspect of the present invention, the toy doll includes a torso having a head mounted thereon for side to side oscillation and a pair of arms pivotally connected to the torso so that the configuration of the arms with respect to the torso can be selectively adjusted. Each of the arms have upper arm and forearm portions, with the forearm portions thereof including hands whose fingers are formed in a predetermined configuration. In addition, at least one of the dolls arms includes an articulated joint adjustably interconnecting the upper and forearm portions thereof as the elbow of the arm for selective rotation of the forearm portion about a pair of perpendicularly extending axes. One of the axes extends longitudinally through the upper arm portion and the other axis extends generally perpendicularly thereto so that the forearm portion of the doll may be placed in any of a substantially infinite number of relative positions with respect to the upper arm portion.

A selectively operable electric motor is mounted in the torso and is operatively connected to the articu lated joint of the arm through a transmission system which is adapted to oscillate the joint and forearm portion along the longitudinally extending axis of the upper arm upon actuation of the motor. In this manner the forearm portion and the hand associated therewith are oscillated in a predetermined and preselected plane while the upper arm portion remains motionless. Accordingly, the doll of the present invention has the capacity of simulating the movements of a human playing an instrument, wherein the arm having the articulated joint is positioned to simulate the position of a human hand and forearm strumming a guitar.

The other arm of the doll also can be articulated between the upper arm and forearm portions thereof, so that the configuration of the arm can be varied. In this regard, one contemplated use of the doll is to simulate playing of a guitar and thus the non-driven articulated arm would be positioned to hold the long fretted neck of the guitar while the driven or oscillated arm simulates the strumming of the guitar.

The transmission system utilized in the doll also is operatively connected between the motor and the head of the doll to oscillate the dolls head from side to side with respect to the torso in order to simulate the swaying movement of the head of a person playing the guitar and following the beat of the music.

The above, and other objects, features and advantages of this invention will be apparent in the following detailed description of an illustrative embodiment thereof which is to be read in connection with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a front elevational view, partly in section, of a mechanized toy doll constructed in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a partial side sectional view taken along line 2-2 in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a sectional view taken along line 33 of FIG. 1; and

FIG. 4 is a schematic illustration of the motion of the articulated forearm portion of the driven arm in the doll of the present invention.

Referring to the drawing in detail, and initially to FIG. 1 thereof, it will be seen that a toy doll 10, embodying the present invention, has a torso 12, a head 14, and a pair of arms l6, 18 respectively. Each of the arms includes a forearm portion 20 and an upper arm portion 22 joined at the elbow of the arms by articulated joint members 24, 26 respectively. The forearm portion 20 of the right arm 16 is selectively driven through a drive system 25 for oscillation in a predetermined plane, selected by adjustment of the arm about joint means 24, as more fully described hereinafter, while simultaneously rocking head 14 from side to side with respect to the torso of the doll in order to simulate human movements. Of course, each forearm 20 has a hand 21 formed on the free end thereof with the fingers in each hand arranged in a predetermined configuration.

Torso 12 is supported by a pair of legs 28 which are pivotally secured to the torso through openings 30 formed therein. The upper ends of the legs are formed with beads 32 having annular recesses 34 which are received in apertures 36 formed in a rigid frame 38 contained within the torso. Bythis arrangement, the doll can be placed in a standing position supported by legs 28 or in a seated position, by merely pivoting the legs to a horizontal configuration in a conventional manner.

Drive system 25 includes an electric motor 40 rigidly mounted in a frame 42 secured within torso 12 of the doll in any convenient manner, as for example, by the bolt 44 and tab 46, seen in FIG. 2. Motor 40 is driven by a current source (not shown), typically comprising a plurality of batteries maintained in a remote control unit. This unit is connected to the dolls body by an external connecting cord running from the control unit and terminating in an electrical plug connector which is adapted to mate with a receptacle 48 in the back of the doll to complete the circuit and supply power to the motor. The plug on the electrical control unit, and the receptacle 48, are provided for the convenience of a child playing with the doll so that the control unit may be readily disconnected from the doll to allow the child to play with the doll without utilizing the control unit.

In one embodiment of the present invention it is contemplated that the control unit may be formed to simulate a juke box with a plurality of prerecorded musical programs therein. When the control unit or juke box is activated, the musical programs are played and the doll is activated by the operation of motor 40, as more fully described hereinafter, to cause the doll to simulate the playing of a musical instrument.

Referring again to FIG. 1, it is seen that the arms 16 and 18 are pivotally mounted on torso 12 in a conventional manner by an annular embossment 50 formed at the upper ends thereof with a groove 52 which is received in an annular opening 54 formed in the torso. Annular groove 52 frictionally engages the edge portion of the torso which defines apertures 54 so that the arms of the doll can be pivoted to any desired relative configuration with respect to the torso and to each other. The arms then will remain in the selected position due to the tight frictional contact between the embossment and the torso.

The articulated joint 24 forming the elbow of arm 16 is constructed of two relatively rigid plastic elements 56 and 58. Member 56 includes a relatively flat circular portion 60 and an elongated stem 62 (see also FIG. 4) having an arrow-shaped head 64 which is forced through an opening 66 in the upper portion of forearm 20. The shoulder 68 formed by head 64 engages an annular rim 70 in forearm 20 to prevent removal of the forearm from stem 62 while permitting relative rotation of the forearm with respect to stem 62, so that the relative position of the forearm with respect to joint 24 and to upper arm portion 22 can be varied.

Member 58 includes a generally cylindrical upper portion 72 and a pair of integrally formed generally hemispherical sections 74 which contain the circular section 60 of member 56 therebetween. The cylindrical section 72 of member 58 is loosely received in a cylindrical bore 76 formed in upper arm portion 22 to permit the joint to be rotated with respect to the arm either manually or by the drive system 25, as more fully described hereinafter. Hemispherical members 74 and member 60 are pivotally interconnected in any convenient manner, such as for example, by a rivet or a nut and bolt assembly 78, so that forearm portion 20 can be pivoted about joint 24 to a plurality of positions. The nut and bolt assembly, while permitting this pivotal motion, holds elements 60, 72 in relatively tight frictional contact with each other so that the forearm 20 will remain in any position to which it is pivoted.

Articulated joint 24 and thus forearm 20 is oscillated through a transmission system 80 operatively connected between motor 40 and the joint. This transmission system is activated from motor 40, as seen in FIG. 1, by a spur gear 82 mounted on the end of the take-off shaft 84 of the motor. Spur gear 82 drives an integrally formed compound gear 86 by engagement with the larger gear 87 thereof. Gear 87 is the first of a plurality of gears in a speed reduction gear train which reduces the speed of rotation of motor 40 as applied to arm 16 and head 14, in order to recreate and simulate life-like movements. If this speed reduction were not provided by the gear system, arm 16 and head 14 would move too rapidly in violent gyrations which would not be lifelike nor consistent with.those of a human. Moreover, the gearing arrangement serves to increase the torque applied to the forearm 20 of arm 16 and to the head of the doll.

Compound gear 86 is rotatably mounted on a shaft 88 supported in frame 42 and includes a smaller pinion gear 90 which is integrally formed on one side of gear 87. Gear 90 is positioned in driving engagement with a larger diameter pinion gear 92 and the latter is rigidly secured to a shaft 94 that is rotatably mounted in frame 42 so that shaft 94 is rotated upon rotation of gear 92. The outer surface 96 of gear 92 is provided with a hole or recess 98 adjacent the periphery of the gear. This hole, which is displaced from the axis of rotation of gear 92, operates as a crank during rotation of gear 92, upon actuation of motor 40, to convert the rotary drive of the motor 40 to an oscillating motion of forearm 20.

To accomplish this conversion of rotary motion to oscillating motion, a rock shaft 100 is positioned in bore 76 of arm 16. In the illustrative embodiment of the invention the rock shaft is integrally formed with a pair of intersecting webs 102, 104, although other configurations of the rock shaft can also be utilized. While otherwise generally clearing the walls of the bore 26, webs 102, 104 have extensions 103, 105 respectively in frictional engagement with the wall forming bore 76 in upper arm portion 22. Extensions 103, 105 serve to keep the rock shaft and thus joint 22 and forearm 20 in a relatively fixed and stable position, unless driven or manually moved. The lower end 106 of rock shaft 100 is provided with a pair of auxiliary extensions 107 and a head 108 which is snap fit in an aperture 1 10 formed in the base of the cylindrical portion 72 of member 58 to hold the articulated joint assembly in the arm. Extensions 107 frictionally engage the inner wall 109 of cylindrical portion 72 and this engagement, in conjunction with the cooperation of head 108 and opening 1 10, is sufficient to effect oscillation of member 58 and thus joint 24 in bore 76 when motor 40 is activated. Additionally, the frictional engagement between wall 109 of cylindrical portion 72 and extension 107 permits joint 24 to be manually rotated in bore 76 so that its configuration with respect to arm 16 may be varied.

The upper end or head 1 12 of rock shaft 100 is pivotally connected to a rod 114 by a pivot pin 116 along an axis which intersects the longitudinal axis of the rock shaft and the axis of rotation of gear 92. Head 112 is slightly larger than bore 76 and cooperates with arm 16 to retain rock shaft 100 in position within upper arm portion 22. The end 118 of rod 114, opposite pivot 1 16, is received in hole 98 formed adjacent the periphery of gear 92. Thus, upon actuation of motor 40, gear train 80 is driven, causing rotation of gear 92 and movement of the end 1 18 of rod 114 in a circular path about the axis of rotation of gear 92. This circular motion causes pivot shaft 116, and thus rock shaft 100, to oscillate about the longitudinal axis of the rock shaft, as seen in FIGS. 3 and 4. As a result, articulated joint 24 is oscillated about the axis, because of the engagement of extension 109 and head 108 in cylindrical portion 72, and forearm is oscillated in a predetermined plane, selected in accordance with the position in which the arm has been placed. For example, as seen in FIGS. 1 and 4, if the doll were utilized to simulate the playing of a guitar 114, with forearm portion 20 pivoted to the configuration illustrated in these Figures, the oscillation of articulated joint 24 will cause the forearm 20 and its hand 21 to move in a plane parallel to the surface of guitar 115, thereby simulating strumming of the guitar strings 117.

Of course, it is to be understood that because of the articulation of forearm 20 with respect to upper arm 22 and because of the pivotal mounting of the entire arm assembly at the shoulder of the torso, arm 16 may be positioned in numerous configurations to simulate other human actions. For example, the arm may be moved to a position where its hand 21 is near the scalp or back of the doll so that the oscillating motion of the hand simulates a scratching action. Other types of simulated movements are also possible with appropriate positioning of arm 16.

It is noted that the hands 21 of both arms 16 and 18 are preferably formed in a configuration which will enhance the simulated playing of guitar 115. Thus, hand 21 of arm 16 is slightly opened to conform to the configuration of a hand strumming a guitar, while the hand 21 of arm 18 is slightly closed in order to frictionally engage the fretted neck 116 of guitar 115 and hold it in position during operation of the doll. Of course, hands 21 may be provided in other configurations depending upon the principal actions intended to be simulated by the doll.

In the illustrative embodiment of the present invention arm 18 is not driven by motor 40, but is simply a static arm which can be placed in a plurality of predetermined positions by appropriate adjustment of its articulated joint 26. The latter is formed of substantially the same construction as articulated joint 24, having a pair of rigid members 56', 58 which correspond substantially to the members 56 and 58 of articulated joint 24. Thus, member 56 includes a stem portion 62 which is frictionally engaged in forearm 20 so that the configuration of this forearm can be adjusted with respect to joint 26. Member 58' on the other hand, is formed integrally with a shaft 122 rotatably mounted in upper arm portion 22 by the frictional engagement of extensions 124 thereon with the wall forming the bore 72 of this arm. Shaft 122 is retained in upper arm 22 by the head portion 123 thereof which is slightly larger in diameter than the bore 72 of the arm. In this case, since arm 18 is not driven, member 58' does not have a cylindrical frictional coupling such as that of the articulated joint 24, but rather the hemispherical sections 74 thereof are formed integrally with the shaft, in the manner illustrated in FIG. 1. This arrangement permits adjustment of joint 26 with respect to upper arm 22 and simultaneous adjustment of forearm 20 with respect to the joint so that the forearm 20 and its hand 21 can be moved to a plurality of positions as desired by the child. Additional adjustment and variations are provided by the pivotal mounting of the entire arm assembly at the shoulder of the torso 12. In this manner both arms 16 and 18 are adjustable to innumerable positions during play so that a variety of actions can be simulated by the doll when motor 40 is activated.

It is noted that although the illustrative embodiment of the present invention has been described with only one of the arms 16 connected to motor 40, it is contemplated that the motor can be connected by a duplicate drive train to the arm 18 so that both arms can be simultaneously driven by the motor.

Drive system 25 is also adapted to provide simultaneous movement of head 14 in a side to side motion with respect to torso 12. To accomplish this motion head 14 is frictionally engaged with a supporting stem or rod and is secured thereto by a pair of shoulders 132 formed on the rod and engaged with complementary shoulders molded in the neck portion 134 of the head. This arrangement not only secures the head to the supporting rod but permits the head to be rotated on the rod so that the configuration of the head with respect to the torso can be selectively varied as desired.

Rod 130 extends downwardly from head 14 through an aperture 136 in torso 12 towards drive system 25. The rod is provided with an annular bearing surface 138 located between neck portion 134 of head 14 and the neck portion 140 of torso 12. An additional annular member 142 is integrally formed on rod 130 and located within the interior of torso 12 so that head 14 is not removable from the torso. However, the rod has a diameter which is slightly less than the diameter of opening 136 so that rod 130 may wobble within opening 36 in neck portion 140 to cause wobbling of head 14.

To accomplish this wobbling motion, shaft 94 is provided with a wobble plate 144 connected thereto for rotation with the shaft. The wobble plate 142 is engaged by a follower track 145 formed integrally on the end 146 of rod 130 and having a greater width than the plate. Upon oscillation of wobble plate 144, track 145 is moved from side to side, as indicated by the solid and dotted lines in FIG. 1, so as to cause oscillation of rod 130 in neck 140. In this manner head 114 is moved from side to side to simulate the rhythmical motions of the head which normally accompany the playing of a guitar.

Accordingly, it is seen that a relatively inexpensive and simply constructed doll is provided in which the single motor 40 is adapted to drive only the forearm portion of the arm while it simultaneously oscillates the head of the doll from side to side thereby simulating human movements in a realistic manner.

Although an illustrative embodiment of the present invention has been described herein with reference to the accompanying drawings, it is to be understood that the invention is not limited to that precise embodiment and that various changes and modifications may be effected therein by one skilled in the art without departing from the scope or spirit of this invention.

What is claimed is:

l. A toy comprising, a torso, a pair of arms mounted on said torso and having upper arm and forearm portions, a selectively operable rotary drive means mounted in said torso and transmission means operatively connecting said drive means to the forearm portion of one of said arms, through the upper arm portion thereof, for oscillating said forearm portion in a predetermined plane upon actuation of said drive means while its associated upper arm portion remains motionless, said transmission means including means adjustably interconnecting said forearm portion to said upper arm portion for permitting the relative position of said forearm portion with respect to said upper arm portion to be varied independently of the oscillation thereof by said drive means, whereby the plane in which said forearm portion is oscillated may be varied;

said adjustable interconnecting means comprising first and second relatively rigid members pivotally interconnected and located at the elbow of said one arm, to permit relative pivotal movement of said forearm portion with respect to said upper arm portion, said first and second members being relatively tightly frictionally engaged whereby said forearm remains fixed in any position to which it is moved with respect to said upper arm;

said first and second rigid members being adjustably connected to said first arm portion and said forearm portion respectively to permit the annular position of said forearm portion to be varied with respect to said rigid members and to permit the angular position of said rigid members and the pivotal connection therebetween to be varied with respect to said upper arm portion;

said transmission means including a longitudinally extending rock shaft rotatably mounted in the upper arm portion of said one arm and operatively connected to said forearm portion thereof, a first crank operatively connected to said drive means for rotation thereby and means operatively connected between said first crank and said rock shaft for oscillating said shaft in response to rotation of said first crank;

said means operatively connected between said first crank and said rock shaft being connected to said rock shaft at a position intersecting the longitudinal axis of the rock shaft and said first crank being located in said torso with its axis of rotation intersecting the connection between said rock shaft and said connecting means thereby to oscillate said rock shaft about its longitudinal axis;

said first crank comprising a rotatably mounted pinion gear and said means operatively connected between said first crank and said rock shaft comprising an elongated rod pivotally connected at one end to said rock shaft at said position intersecting the longitudinal axis thereof and operatively connected at its other end adjacent the periphery of said pinion gear, said pinion gear being located in said torso with its axis of rotation intersecting the pivotal connection between said rod and said rock shaft whereby said other end of said rod rotates with said pinion gear and said rock shaft is oscillated about its longitudinal axis.

2. The toy doll as defined in claim 1 wherein said transmission includes a gear train drivingly connected between said drive means and said pinion gear, said gear train including a plurality of rotatably mounted gears adapted to reduce the speed of rotation of said drive means to provide a life-like motion to said forearm portion and to increase the torque of the drive means.

3. The toy doll as defined in claim 1 including a head and means operatively connected between said head and said drive means for oscillating said head with a generally side to side motion in response to actuation of said drive means.

4. The toy defined in claim 3 wherein said means operatively connected between said head and said drive means comprises an elongated supporting rod frictionally engaged at one end in said head and extending through said torso into the interior thereof, a wobble plate rotated by said drive means, and a follower track formed in the other end of said supporting rod and received in said wobble plate, whereby said supporting rod and head are oscillated upon rotation of said wobble plate.

5. A toy doll comprising, a torso, a head, and a pair of arms operatively connected to said torso, said arms having upper forearm portions and said forearm por tions having hands formed at the ends thereof, one of said arms including joint means adjustably interconnecting the upper arm and forearm portions thereof at the elbow of the arm for selective rotation of said forearm portion about first and second axes with respect to said upper arm portion, said first axes extending longitudinally through said upper arm portion and said second axes extending generally perpendicularly thereto, a selectively operable electric motor mounted in said torso, and transmission means operatively connecting said motor to said joint means, through said upper arm portion, for oscillating said joint and forearm portion about the first axes upon actuation of said motor, whereby said forearm portion and the head associated therewith are oscillated in a predetermined plane while said upper arm portion remains motionless and the relative position of said forearm portion with respect to said upper arm portion may be varied by selective rotation of said arm portion about either of said first or second axes thereby to vary the plane in which said forearm portion is oscillated;

said upper arm portions of each of said arms being rotatably mounted on said torso whereby the relative configuration of said arms with respect to said torso and to each other may be varied without interfering with said transmission means;

said transmission means including a rock shaft rotatably mounted in the upper arm portion of said one arm for oscillation about said first axis, means for oscillating said shaft, including a rod pivotally connected to one end of said rock shaft, along an axis intersecting said first axis, said rock shaft being operatively connected at its opposite end to said joint means whereby oscillation of said rock shaft causes said oscillation of said joint means and forearm portion about said axis; and

a gear train drivingly connected between said motor and said rod, said gear train including a pinion gear rotatably mounted in said torso about an axis intersecting the pivotal connection of said rod and rock shaft, said rod being operatively connected to a peripheral portion of said pinion gear at the end of said rod opposite its pivotal connection with said rock shaft whereby rotation of said pinion gear causes rotation of said opposite end of said rod about the axis of rotation of the pinion gear and oscillation of the pivotal connection between said rod and said rock shaft about said first axis.

6. The toy doll as defined in claim 5 wherein said joint means comprises a first rigid connecting member frictionally engaged in the upper arm portion of said one arm at said elbow to permit oscillation of said joint with respect thereto and being frictionally engaged with said opposite end of said rock shaft for selective relative movement with respect thereto about said first axis and for selective oscillation therewith upon actuation of said motor, a second rigid connecting member frictionally engaged in said forearm at said elbow to permit selective adjustment of the configuration of said forearm with respect to said joint means and said upper arm, and means pivotally interconnecting and frictionally engaging said rigid connecting members about said second axis whereby the relative angular configuration of said forearm and upper arm portions may be selectively adjusted about the second axis to vary the plane of oscillation of said forearm and associated hand.

7. The toy doll as defined in claim 6 including means for mounting said head on said torso and for permitting side to side oscillation of said head with respect to the torso, and means operatively connected between said motor and said mounting means for oscillating said head with a generally side to side motion in response to actuation of said motor.

8. The toy doll as defined in claim 7 wherein said torso has a neck portion having an opening therein and said means for mounting said head comprises an elongated supporting rod mounted in said neck and extending through said opening and being operatively connected to said head, said rod having a smaller width than the diameter of said opening whereby said rod may be oscillated in said neck from side to side with respect to said torso.

9. The toy doll as defined in claim 8 wherein said means for oscillating said head comprises a rotatably mounted wobble plate rotated by said motor through said gear train and a follower track formed on the end of said supporting rod opposite said head for receiving said wobble plate and being oscillated laterally thereby, whereby said supporting rod and head are tilted from side to side with respect to said torso upon actuation of said motor.

10. The toy doll as defined in claim 9 wherein said gear train includes a plurality of rotatably mounted gears adapted to reduce the speed of rotation of said motor to provide a life-like motion to said forearm portion and said head, and to increase the torque of the motor. I

11. The toy doll as defined in claim 10 wherein said head is frictionally engaged with said supporting rod whereby the relative position of said head on said rod and with respect to said torso may be varied.

12. The toy doll as defined in claim 11 wherein the other one of said arms includes articulated joint means adjustably interconnecting the upper arm and forearm portions thereof for selective rotation of said forearm portion about at least two axes.

13. The toy doll as defined in claim 12 wherein said hand on said other one of said arms includes fingers fixed in a predetermined configuration for grasping and holding a selected toy instrument therein.

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Referenced by
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US4114313 *Jan 21, 1977Sep 19, 1978Mattel, Inc.Combination doll and accessory articles
US4559021 *Dec 27, 1983Dec 17, 1985Mattel, Inc.Poseable doll head
US4655725 *Oct 11, 1985Apr 7, 1987Mattel, Inc.Animated figure toy
US5394766 *Feb 16, 1993Mar 7, 1995The Walt Disney CompanyRobotic human torso
US5784815 *Oct 4, 1996Jul 28, 1998Mr. Christmas IncorporatedLighted sculpture with plural synchronized motions
US5823845 *Mar 12, 1996Oct 20, 1998Kieran Bergin, Inc.Mobile, gyroscopically stabilized toy with controlled multi-action movements
US6022263 *Mar 20, 1998Feb 8, 2000Lcd International, L.L.C.Mechanical toy figures
US6093078 *Feb 4, 1999Jul 25, 2000Mattel, Inc.Hand held doll simulating skating action
US6149491 *Jul 14, 1998Nov 21, 2000Marvel Enterprises, Inc.Self-propelled doll responsive to sound
US6416380 *Jan 5, 2001Jul 9, 2002Blue Ridge Designs Inc.Motion toy
US6604977Apr 24, 2001Aug 12, 2003Tomy Company, Ltd.Wobbling toy and wobbling toy set
US7815485Oct 19, 2010Shoot The Moon Products Ii, LlcPose and play dolls
US20070149089 *Nov 7, 2006Jun 28, 2007Gabriel De La TorreCustomizable action figures
US20090215358 *Feb 27, 2008Aug 27, 2009Shoot The Moon Products Ii, LlcPose and Play Dolls
US20140329434 *May 1, 2014Nov 6, 2014Mattel, Inc.Toy figure with movable appendage
Classifications
U.S. Classification446/354
International ClassificationA63H13/00, A63H3/48, A63H3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63H13/005, A63H3/48
European ClassificationA63H13/00B, A63H3/48
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Nov 21, 1986ASAssignment
Owner name: E. I. DU PONT DE NEMOURS AND COMPANY, WILMINGTON,
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:FORD MOTOR COMPANY;REEL/FRAME:004660/0502
Effective date: 19861118
Owner name: VIEW-MASTER IDEAL GROUP, INC., 200 FIFTH AVENUE, N
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST. AS OF JANUARY 21, 1986.;ASSIGNOR:CBS INC., A CORP OF NY;REEL/FRAME:004648/0575
Effective date: 19861107
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:FORD MOTOR COMPANY;REEL/FRAME:4660/502
Owner name: E. I. DU PONT DE NEMOURS AND COMPANY,DELAWARE
Owner name: VIEW-MASTER IDEAL GROUP, INC., A CORP OF DE,NEW YO
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:CBS INC., A CORP OF NY;REEL/FRAME:004648/0575
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:FORD MOTOR COMPANY;REEL/FRAME:004660/0502
Owner name: E. I. DU PONT DE NEMOURS AND COMPANY, DELAWARE
Nov 16, 1983ASAssignment
Owner name: CBS INC., 51 WEST 52ND STREET, NEW YORK, NY 1001
Free format text: NUNC PRO TUNC ASSIGNMENT;ASSIGNOR:IDEAL TOY CORPORATION, A CORP OF DE;REEL/FRAME:004210/0055
Effective date: 19831108
Owner name: IDEAL TOY CORPORATION 184-10 JAMAICA AVENUE HOLLIS
Free format text: NUNC PRO TUNC ASSIGNMENT;ASSIGNOR:IDEAL TOY CORPORATION, A NY CORP.;REEL/FRAME:004210/0050
Effective date: 19720410