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Publication numberUS3776563 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 4, 1973
Filing dateSep 1, 1972
Priority dateSep 1, 1972
Publication numberUS 3776563 A, US 3776563A, US-A-3776563, US3776563 A, US3776563A
InventorsTigert A
Original AssigneeTigert A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ski and core construction
US 3776563 A
Abstract
A ski body including a body core laminated between top and bottom reinforcing sheets or panels. The top and bottom sheets are in turn covered by a top outer surface panel and a plastic, or other material, lower running surface or sheet. The core consists of a plurality of transversely elongated and longitudinally spaced links with adjacent link sides provided with tightly interdigitated knuckles. The spaces between adjacent knuckles on each side of each link seatingly and tightly receive the opposing knuckles of the adjacent link and the transversely overlapped knuckle surfaces are frictionally engaged with each other and may be roughened to promote additional stiffness of the ski core.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

[ SKI AND CORE CONSTRUCTION [76] Inventor: Allen R. Tigert, 2031 Olympic Dr.,

Anchorage, Alaska 99502 Primary Examinerl(enneth H. Betts Assistant ExaminerDavid M. Mitchell Att0meyl-larvey B. Jacobson [22] Filed: Sept. 1, 1972 [21] App]. No.: 285,560 [57] ABSTRACT A ski body including a body core laminated between [52] US. Cl. 280/1L13 L, 280/1 1.13 F p and bottom in ing h e or panel The top [51] Int. Cl. A63c 5/00 and bottom h ts are in turn covered by a top outer [58] Field of Search 280/11.13 L, 11.13 K, Surface Panel and a plastic, or other material, lower 280/1 1 13 F running surface or sheet. The core consists of a plurality of transversely elongated and longitudinally spaced [56] Ref e Cit d links with adjacent link sides provided with tightly in- UNITED STATES PATENTS terdigitated knuckles. The spaces between adjacent knuckles on each side of each link seatingly and 2,545,209 3 1951 Meehan 280/1 1.13 K 2,661,219 12 1953 Coulson, Jr... 280/1 1.13 L tightly recewe the oppsmg knuckles of the adjacent 3,635,482 1 1972 Holman 280/1 1.13 L lmk f transvelsely ofeflapped knuckle Surfaces 3,635,482 1/1972 Holman 280 11.13 L are fflctlonally engaged with each other and y be roughened to promote additional stiffness of the ski FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS core 844,183 7 1939 France 280 11.13 L

68,493 10 1944 Norway 280/1 1.13 L 9 Claims, 9 Drawmg Flgures PATENTEDUEC 4W5 SHEU 2 0F 2 m 9 Y Mk Q Q QN NW mm M 5m mm ME I Tm \vh Qua SKI AND CORE CONSTRUCTION The ski construction of the instant invention has been primarily designed to provide a ski with relatively great torsional stiffness as well as reasonable longitudinal flexure.

Longitudinal flex and twisting or torsional flex of a ski are two of the most important parameters in determining performance characteristics of a ski. At present, at least for production skis, designs allow only very limited variation in the ratio between lengthwise flex and torsional flex. For designs presently in use there exists a rather strict proportionality between these two factors in that an increase in lengthwise stiffness of the ski is necessary to increase the torque resistance of the ski, and vice versa.

The ski construction of the instant invention utilizes a core design that is of a chain link form in principle and which may be used in the place of wooden or foam cores that are presently used in most skis. By utilizing such links in the core of a ski, the core could be constructed so as to contribute very little to the lengthwise flex of the ski while adding considerably to the torsional resistance of the ski.

The main object of this invention is to provide a ski core construction whose design will enable the ratio of longitudinal flexure to torsional flexure of the finished ski to be varied throughout a wide range.

Another object of this invention is to provide a ski core construction readily adaptable to present ski manufacturing processes.

A still further important object of this invention is to provide a ski core construction in accordance with the preceding objects which may be readily incorporated into various types of skis.

A final object of this invention to be specifically enumerated herein is to provide a ski core construction which will conform to conventional forms of manufacture, be of simple construction and dependable in performance so as to provide a device that will be economically feasible, long lasting and predictable within close tolerances.

These together with other objects and advantages which will become subsequently apparent reside in the details of construction and operation as more fully hereinafter described and claimed, reference being had to the accompanying drawings forming a part hereof, wherein like numerals refer to like parts throughout.

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a ski constructed in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged fragmentary top plan view of the ski illustrated in FIG. 1 with portions of the upper panel members of the ski being broken away and additional portions of the steel edges of the ski being illustrated in horizontal section;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged longitudinal vertical sectional view taken substantially upon the plane indicated by the section line 3-3 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged fragmentary longitudinal vertical sectional view taken substantially upon the plane indicated by the section line 44 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 5 is a transverse vertical sectional view taken substantially upon the plane indicated by the section line 5-5 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 6 is a transverse vertical sectional view taken substantially upon the plane indicated by the section line 66 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 7 is a fragmentary perspective view of the rear end portion of the ski with the top sheet and upper stiffener panel removed as well as the link portion of the core to illustrate the assembly of the various components of the ski;

FIG. 8 is a fragmentary longitudinal vertical sectional view similar to the central portion of FIG. 3 and illustrating a modified form of core; and

FIG. 9 is a perspective view of a pair of adjacent core member links of the modified form of core construction illustrated in FIG. 8.

Referring now more specifically to the drawings, the numeral 10 generally designates a ski constructed in accordance with the present invention.

The ski 10 includes a body core referred to in general by the reference numeral 12 bonded between a pair of upper and lower stiffening plates 14 and 16. The upper stiffening plate is covered by means of a top sheet 18 and a filler sheet 20 underlies the lower stiffening plate and is itself covered on its underside by means of a formed lower running surface sheet 22.

The ski 10 is of course conventional in overall shape in that it includes an upwardly curving forward toe end portion 24 and a squared rear end portion 26.

From FIGS. 2 through 4 of the drawings, it may be seen that the central portion of the body core 12 extending between the toe end portion 24 and the rear end portion 26 comprises a plurality of transversely elongated longitudinally spaced links 28. Each link 28 includes a pair of opposite side outwardly projecting knuckles 30 and the ends of the links 28 are squared and planar. In addition, the links 28 each includes planar upper and lower surfaces 32 and 34. The knuckles 30 are generally semi-cylindrical in cross-sectional shape and include squared end surfaces 36. The links 28 are arranged in side-by-side relation with the knuckles 30 on opposing sides of adjacent links 28 interdigitated and the opposing surfaces 36 in frictional engagement with each other. Further, each pair of knuckles 30 has its outer extremity frictionally engaged with the opposing side of the adjacent link 28. The forwardmost link 28 has its knuckles received between corresponding knuckles 40 of a forward body core member 42 which extends throughout the toe end portion 24 and the knuckles of the rearmost link 28 are received between corresponding knuckles 44 of a rear body core member 46 extending throughout the rear end portion 26.

The top stiffening plate 14 is bonded to the upper surfaces 32 of the links 28 and the upper surfaces 48 and 50 of the body core members 42 and 46. In addition, the lower stiffening plate 16 is bonded to the undersurfaces 34 of the links 28 as well as the undersurfaces 52 and 54 of the forward body core member 42 and rear body core member 46. In this manner, with the knuckles 30 of adjacent links 28 tightly interdigitated, a body core is provided that greatly resists torsional flexure and yet allows reasonable longitudinal flexure.

If greater torsional stiffness or resistance to torsional flexure is desired, the surfaces 36 may be roughened so as to more tightly frictionally engage each other.

The upper stiffener plate is covered by means of the top sheet 18 and the filler sheet 20 underlies the lower stiffening plate 16 with the lower running surface sheet 22 underlying the filler sheet 20. The opposite side edges of the body core 12, the stiffening plate 16 and the filler sheet 20 have steel edge members 58 bonded thereto and the edge members 58 are notched as at 60 to receive the remote side marginal edge portions of the running surface sheet 22. Also, the opposite sides of the body core 12 disposed above the edges 58 are closed by means of flexible side wall sheets 62.

It will also be noted from FIGS. 3 and 4 of the drawings that the interdigitated knuckles 30 are provided with aligned bores extending longitudinally of the links 28 and that shear pins 66 are secured through the various sets of aligned bores which are referred to by the reference numerals 68. The pins 66 offer additional resistance to torsional flexure of the ski 10.

With attention now invited more specifically to FIGS. 8 and 9 of the drawings, there will be seen a modified body core 12 wherein a plurality of links 28 corresponding to the links 28 are utilized. The links 28 include knuckles 30' corresponding to the knuckles 30 and various other features of the links 28' corresponding to the similar features of the links 28 are referred to by corresponding prime reference numerals. The only difference between the links 28 and the links 28 is that the knuckles 36 of the links 28' are not provided with bores corresponding to the bores 68 and therefore pins corresponding to the pins 66 are not used.

The tolerances between the end faces 36 of the knuckles 30 and the end faces 36 of the knuckles 30 may be changed in order to vary the torsional resistance of the ski 10. In addition, as hereinbefore set forth, the surfaces 36 and 36 may be roughened so as to increase torsional resistance. Also, the outer extremities of the knuckles 30 and 30' may, or may not be tightly frictionally engaged with the opposing surfaces of the adjacent links so as to vary the torsional resistance of the ski 10.

Further, torsional resistance provided by the ski may be varied according to the thickness of the stiffening plates 14 and 16 and also according to the materials utilized in the construction of the links 28 and 28'. Accordingly, considerable variance in the ratio between resistance to torsional flexing and the resistance to longitudinal flexing may be had with the body core construction of the instant invention.

The foregoing is considered as illustrative only of the principles of the invention. Further, since numerous modifications and changes will readily occur to those skilled in the art, it is not desired to limit the invention to the exact construction and operation shown and described, and accordingly all suitable modifications and equivalents may be resorted to, falling within the scope of the invention.

What is claimed as new is as follows:

1. An elongated ski body core construction comprising a plurality of longitudinally spaced side-by-side and transversely elongated links, the opposing sides of adjacent links including longitudinally spaced outwardly projecting knuckles snugly interdigitated relative to each other, and elongated longitudinally extending upper and lower reinforcing panels overlying and underlying the upper and lower surfaces, respectively, of said links and bonded to the latter.

2. The combination of claim 1 wherein said links and knuckles are integrally formed and constructed of rigid material.

3. The combination of claim 1 wherein the interdigitated knuckles of adjacent links include corresponding aligned bores, and a shear pin secured through each of said corresponding aligned bores.

4. The combination of claim 1 wherein the opposite sides of said ski body core construction include longitudinally extending upstanding opposite side walls overlying and secured to the side marginal edges of said reinforcing panels and the ends of said links.

5. The combination of claim 4 wherein said side walls are constructed of somewhat flexible material.

6. The combination of claim 1 including elongated longitudinally extending opposite side edge members extending along and secured to the opposite side marginal edges of said lower reinforcing panel.

7. The combination of claim 6 wherein the opposite sides of said ski body core construction include longitudinally extending upstanding opposite side walls overlying and secured to the side marginal edges of said reinforcing panels and the ends of said links, the lower marginal edges of said side walls abutting upper surface portions of said edges.

8. The combination of claim 1 wherein said core construction is sandwiched between a top sheet overlying said upper panel and a bottom sheet underlying said lower panel to form a complete ski body.

9. The combination of claim 8 wherein said ski body includes front and rear ends, the link of said body core construction at the rear end of said body extending longitudinally of said body a greater extent than the width of said body, the front end of said ski curving upwardly to form a toe portion and the forwardmost link of said ski body core construction extending longitudinally of said body a greater extent than the width of said body and throughout the upwardly curving toe portion of the ski body.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2545209 *Jun 10, 1948Mar 13, 1951Meehan Reginald JDiscerptible ski
US2661219 *Dec 31, 1948Dec 1, 1953Coulson Jr Bevis PFlexible ski
US3635482 *Jun 29, 1970Jan 18, 1972Amf IncSki and method of manufacture
FR844183A * Title not available
NO68493A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4018454 *Feb 23, 1976Apr 19, 1977Hannes MarkerDevice for damping vibration of a ski
US4577886 *Jul 26, 1984Mar 25, 1986Chernega John OAdjustable flex ski
US5224890 *Jan 16, 1991Jul 6, 1993KranscoBodyboard with variable stiffness
US5295883 *Feb 15, 1991Mar 22, 1994KranscoBodyboard with stiffening reinforcement
US5678841 *Jan 16, 1996Oct 21, 1997Skis Rossignol S.A.Shell skis having longitudinally offset edge elements
US6604754 *Oct 6, 2000Aug 12, 2003Kaj GyrIntegral suspension system for skis
US6908351Jun 24, 2003Jun 21, 2005Wham-O, Inc.Expanded polystyrene core sports board
US7368031Nov 17, 2003May 6, 2008Wham-O, Inc.Laminate inlay process for sports boards
US7654554 *Feb 2, 2010Goodwell International, Ltd.Sports board with an interlocking structure
US8465044 *Jun 18, 2013Flow Sports, Inc.Sports board with an interlocking structure
US20040026894 *Aug 6, 2003Feb 12, 2004Kaj GyrIntegral suspension system for skis
US20040151875 *Nov 17, 2003Aug 5, 2004Lehr Gregory S.Laminate inlay process for sports boards
US20040266289 *Jun 24, 2003Dec 30, 2004Scott BurkeExpanded polystyrene core sports board
US20080248261 *Apr 5, 2007Oct 9, 2008Bonnett Robert APrinted article
US20100133766 *Jan 25, 2010Jun 3, 2010Anthony ScaturroSports board with an interlocking structure
Classifications
U.S. Classification280/602, 280/610
International ClassificationA63C5/12
Cooperative ClassificationA63C5/12
European ClassificationA63C5/12