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Publication numberUS3777324 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 11, 1973
Filing dateSep 1, 1971
Priority dateSep 1, 1971
Publication numberUS 3777324 A, US 3777324A, US-A-3777324, US3777324 A, US3777324A
InventorsL Jenkins
Original AssigneeL Jenkins
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
All purpose shoe
US 3777324 A
Abstract
A shoe for movement over water, snow, sand, mud and the like. There is a shoe for each foot of the wearer. Each shoe comprises a hollow, elongated body made of suitable material, such as an injection molded polypropylene plastic. The forward end of each shoe is curved inwardly from side-to-side and top to bottom, and also is centrally contoured at the forward end to form a lifting surface. The rear end of the shoe is slightly curved from side-to-side and from top to bottom. Midway between the ends of each shoe, and mounted on the upper wall thereof, is a toe pocket, a heel strap and ankle straps for securing a foot to the associated shoe. Along the side walls are found horizontally spaced friction cups to provide traction for a foot remaining in position while the other foot is advanced. A plurality of closed curved members are secured to the side and top walls of each shoe to form a hand grip and also to form an anchor or tie-loop for securing a line or the like to the shoe. Along the bottom wall adjacent to the side walls of the shoe are longitudinally extending ribs for protecting the bottom wall and forward end of the shoe from damage.
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United States Patent [1 1 Jenkins [111 3,777,324 Dec. 11, 1973 ALL PURPOSE SHOE [76 Inventor: Larry E. Jenkins, 481 Loumena In, San Jose, Calif. 95111 [22] Filed: Sept. 1, 1971 [21] Appl. No.: 176,951

[52] U.S. Cl 9/310 D [51] Int. Cl. A634: 15/02 [58] Field of Search 9/310, 310 D, 310 R [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,719,059 7/1929 Krupka et a1 9/310 D 2,165,547 7/1939 Hill 9/310 AA UX 2,707,789 5/1955 Brown 9/310 D 2,997,299 8/1961 Wilkins, Jr 9/310 C X 3,108,296 10/1963 Smith 9/310 D 3,388,908 6/1968 Ruck 9/310 C X FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 1,015,043 8/1952 France 9/310 D 1,095,277 5/1955 France 9/310 D 1,266,279 5/1961 France 9/310 C 647,760 7/1937 Germany 9/310 D 959,272 5/1964 Great Britain 9/310 D 633,436 2/1962 Italy 9/310 A Primary Examiner-Milton Buchler Assistant ExaminerPaul E. Sauberer Anorney-Jack M. Wiseman [57] ABSTRACT A shoe for movement over water, snow, sand, mud and the like. There is a shoe for each foot of the wearer. Each shoe comprises a hollow, elongated body made of suitable material, such as an injection molded polypropylene plastic. The forward end of each shoe is curved inwardly from side-to-side and top to bottom, and also is centrally contoured at the forward end to form a lifting surface. The rear end of the shoe is slightly curved from side-to-side and from top to bottom. Midway between the ends of each shoe, and mounted on the upper wall thereof, is a toe pocket, a heel strap and ankle straps for securing a foot to the associated shoe. Along the side walls are found horizontally spaced friction cups to provide traction for a foot remaining in position while the other foot is advanced. A plurality of closed curved members are secured to the side and top walls of each shoe to form a hand grip and also to form an anchor or tie-loop for securing a line or the like to the shoe. Along the bottom wall adjacent to the side walls of the shoe are longitudinally extending ribs for protecting the bottom wall and forward end of the shoe from damage.

11 Claims, 15 Drawing Figures PATENTED DEC 1 1 I975 SHEET 10F 5 525cl 3? 11 40 m FIB .5

INVENTOR. LARRY 5 JENKINS BY i M J A T TORNE Y PATENIED BEC 1 1 I975 3.77732 SHEET 20F 5 FIB E;

INVENTOR. LARRY E. JENKINS BY )u. ww

A T TORNE Y PAIENTEUUEC 11 m5 3.777324 sum u w 5 2 Ig INVENTOR.

LARRY E JENKINS AT TORNEY PATENTEDHEE 11 I975 SHEET 5 u; 5 3,777,324

12 I25 34 I4 1214 2 I2! 150 if A AU W m C: D D c, D

" INVENTOR.

LARRY E. JENKINS N. UM

AT TORNE Y5 ALL PURPOSE SHOE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Patents of interest are: No. 2,65 1,790, No. 1,463,330, No. 2,052,240, No. 1,719,059 No. 1,628,368, No. 1,413,602, No. 3,108,296, No. 1,693,867, No. 3,144,849, No. 2,509,603, No. 1,777,698.

SUMMARY OF 'THE INVENTION A shoe for movement over water, snow or the like comprising a floatable elongated body with a curved forward end and a curved rear end. Means for securing the foot of a wearer to the top wall of the body. The shoe is contoured to provide an improved lifting action.

A feature of the present invention is the traction means disposed along the side walls of the shoe for facilitating the temporary retention of one foot in position while the other foot is advanced for movement along water, snow or the like.

Another feature of the present invention is the closed securing means along the side walls of the shoe for attaching lines or the like to the shoe and for gripping the shoe manually.

Another feature of the present invention is the longitudinally extending ribs along the bottom wall of the shoe adjacent the side walls of the shoe for protecting the bottom wall and the forward end of the shoe from damage.

Another feature of the present invention is the arrangement for securing the foot-ofa wearer to the shoe, whereby the foot can be released from the shoe quickly and with facility.

DESCRIPTION OF'TI-IE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a side elevation view of a shoe embodying the presentinvention.

FIG. 2 is a plan view of the shoe shown in FIG. 1'.

FIG. 3 is a front elevation view of the shoe shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 taken along line 3-3 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 4 is a rear elevation view of the shoe shown in FIGS. l-3 taken along line 4-4 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 5 is a bottom view of the shoe shown in FIGS.

FIG. 6 is a plan view of shoes embodying the present invention secured together, each of which is illustrated in FIGS. 1-5.

FIG. 7 is a vertical sectional view taken along line 7-7 of FIG. 6, shown partially in elevation.

FIG. 8 is a side elevation view of the shoe shown in FIGS. 1-5 used in conjunction with a sail.

FIG. 8A is a diagrammatic perspective view of shoe and sail shown in FIG. 8.

FIG. 9 is an enlarged vertical sectional view partially in elevation taken along line 9--9 of FIG. 8.

FIG. 10 is a fragmentary diagrammatic plan view of the shoes embodying the present invention secured together side-by-side and shown as a motorized unit, each of which shoes is illustrated in FIGS. 1-5.

FIG. 11 is a rear end elevation view of the shoes shown in FIG. 10 as a motorized unit.

FIG. 12 is an elevation view taken along line 1212 of FIG. 10.

FIG. 13 is a side elevation view of a modification of the shoe illustrated in FIGS. l-5, which modified shoe is inflatible.

FIG. 14 is a vertical sectional view taken along line l4l4 of FIG. 13.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Illustrated in FIGS. L5 is the shoe l0 embodying the present invention, which may be employed for travelling over water, snow, m'ud, sand and the like. There is a shoe 10 for the right foot of the wearer and a shoe 10 for the left foot of the wearer.

The shoe 10 comprises a hollow, elongated body 11 made of suitable material, such as injection molded polypropylene plastic. In forming the body 11 two similar sections are formed with lips or flanges 12 and 13 (FIG. 2) disposed along the inboard edges thereof. When confronting lips 12 and 13 of the sections are brought together and bonded together in a suitable manner, such as ultrasonic techniques and the like, they define a longitudinally extended closed path midway between the sides of the body 11 and may be referred to as a vertically disposed, longitudinally directed center plane. For strengthening the body 11, ribs 15 (FIG. 5) are longitudinally spaced, and interiorly disposed in transverse planes within the body 11. The ribs 15 extend in the transverse direction to from a substantial closed path on the inner wall of the body 11. Confronting ends of the ribs are bonded together for improved rigidity.

The body 11 includes a forward end 110 (FIGS. 1 and 3), a rearend 11b (FIGS. land 4), a side wall llc (FIG. 1), a side wall 11d, a bottom wall lle (FIG. 5) and a top wall 11f (FIG. 2). The forward end 11a is bo'wed or curved from side-to-side and from top to bottom. The curve from top to bottom smoothly and gradually merges into the flat bottomsurface of the bottom wall vl 1e. Centrally of the forward end 11 is found a recess 20 (FIG. 3) of gradual indentation to improve the uplift action of the body 11. At the top portion of the forward end-11a is -a gradually narrowing of the exposed surface to define a nose tip 21 for the forward end 11a. The contour above-described lends itself for improved lifting action of the body l1. The rear end 11b is gradually curved from the center thereof toward the respective side walls 1 1c and 1 1d to blend smoothly into the side walls 110 and 11d and may be slightly wider than the forward end Ila. The top wall 11f is substantially flat.

In the exemplary embodiment, the body 1 l is approximately 4'4" long, 6 inches deep, and 8 inches wide. The body 11 is waterproof and will float in water.

Mounted on the top wall 11f are means 25 (FIG. 2) for securing the foot of the wearer to the shoe 10. The foot securingmeans 25 is located approximately centrally between the ends of the body 11 and centrally between the side walls of the body 11. The foot securing means comprises a toe pocket 26 fixed to the top wall 11f centrally of the side walls and 11d to conveniently receive the toes of the wearer and yet permit quick removal of the toes therefrom. Toward this end,

the toe pocket 26 comprises laterally spaced confronting instep overlying bands 26a and 26b made of suitable material such as cloth or leather. The adjacent ends of the bands 26a and 26a are secured together by releasable belts or buckles.

Longitudinally and rearwardly spaced from the toe pocket 26 is a heel stop 27 that is fixed to the top wall 11f centrally of the side walls 110 and 11d and from side-to-side has a convex-concave configuration to conveniently receive the heel of the foot of the wearer to form a rigid stop therefor. The heel stop 27 may be made of a suitable rigid plastic material and is integrally formed with the body 11. Intermediate the top pocket 26 and the heel stop 27 are located flexible ankle straps 28. The ankle straps 28 are anchored to the top wall 1 If by means of loops which are integrally formed with the body member 11 and have conventional mating buckle means at the distal ends thereof. The ankle straps 28 are secured to the loops by sewing and shall be made of rubber or other suitable material to facilitate quick release. Through the foregoing arrangement, the foot of the wearer can be removed from the foot securing means 25 quickly and with facility.

Mounted on the side walls 110 and 11d in transverse alignment are longitudinally spaced traction devices 30 (FIG. 1). Each traction device 30 is made ofa suitable material such as rigid plastic and has a gradual, smooth curved surface from end-to-end. The width and height of the device 30 gradually increases in the front to rear direction. At the forward end of the device 30 is a narrow tip or point and extends longitudinally preferably in the neighborhood of inches at a slope and terminates at its maximum dimension as a flat surface. The traction devices 30 serve to assist the user of the shoe 10 to keep one foot temporarily in position, while advancing the other foot to travel in the advancing direction.

Fixed to the body 11 along the side walls 11c and 11d and along the top wall 11f thereof are substantially semi-annular members 35 (FIGS. 1 and 2) of suitable rigid material. The ends thereof are fixedto the body 11. The length of the members 35 are sufficiently long to be gripped manually by a user. In addition thereto, the members 35 are suitable for anchoring securin means or lines to the body 11. Should it be desired to tow the body 11 or should it be desired to secure two bodies 11 together, suitable lines or cables can be secured or anchored to the members 35. It is within the contemplation of the present invention to secure article carrying sacks to the members 35 by forming suitable pockets on the sack for receiving the members 35 and then by lacing the pockets securely to the member 35.

Along the bottom wall lle are fixed longitudinally extending ribs 40 (FIG. 5) adjacent the respective side walls 11c and 11d which extend partially along the front end 11a and the rear end 11b. The purpose of the ribs or runners 40, which may be made of suitable material, such as a suitable durable plastic material, is to protect the body 1 1 from damage when the body 1 1 engages a foreign object. More specifically, the ribs or runners 40 tend to protect the bottom wall lle from abrasion and puncture; to rigidify and strengthen the body 11; to facilitate the movement of the body 1 1 over snow, mud and ice; and to improve stability of the body 11 during turning movements such as in water skiing and the like. The ribs 40 are integrally formed w ith'the body 11 and are located for improved keeling action.

In addition to the foregoing, a forward bumper 41 (FIGS. 1 and 3) is fixed to the side walls 11c and 11d and the forward end 11a adjacent the top wall llf to further protect the body 11 against damage. Similarly, side wall bumpers 42 (FIGS. 1 and 2) are fixed to the side walls 1 1c and 1 1d adjacent the top wall llfand the rear end 11b. The bumpers 41 and 42 may be made of a suitable durable plastic and are integrally formed with the body 11. The bumpers 41 and 42 are located to serve as a foil whereby fluid action thereagainst tends to give an uplifting action to the body 11. For this purpose, the bumpers 41 and 42 have a 5 upward slant. It is apparent that the traction devices 30, the toe pocket loops, the heel stop 27, the securing members 35, the runners 40 and the bumpers 41-42 may be integrally formed with the body 11.

The traction devices 30 may be of propylene plastic material and have a hollow cup-like configuration. In this configuration, the devices 30 are integrally formed with the body 11. In a modified form, the devices 30 may be partially collapsible and made of nylon cloth and neoprene rubber. Under these circumstances, the partially collapsible device 30 will be urged in flat relation against the body 11 by resistance to fluid when void of any filler. On the other hand, the modified devices 30 may be filled with a liquid, such as water. When this occurs, the devices 30 become inflated and provide traction for the body 11 in a manner previously described.

Illustrated in FIGS. 6 and 7 is a modification of the shoe 10, whereby a plurality of shoes 10 can be secured together side-by-side for surfing, sailing or floating. Toward this end, the body 11 is formed with a cylindrical upright wall 11g. Received by the cylindrical wall 11g is a lower bushing of suitable material, such as nylon. Received by the cylindrical wall 11g and the lower bushing 50 is an upper bushing 51 of suitable material such as nylon.

Disposed within the bushings 50 and 51 for one body 1 l is a right angular threaded tie member 52. A suitable nut 53 and washer 54 preclude the tie member 52 from being raised out of the bushing 50. A stop integral with the tie member 52 limits the downward of the tie member 52. A washer 56 is located between the bushing 51 and the stop 55. There is a close fit between the halves of the body 11 when bonded together to form a water-tight seal. There is a limited vertical play in the movement of the tie rod 52. The openings that receive the bushings 50 and 51 have their wall in water-tight sealing engagement with the interior of the body 11. This is achieved by the body 11 halves being preformed with the semi-cylindrical opening walls in intimate contact when the body 11 halves are bonded together.

Disposed within the bushings 50 and 51 for the other body 11 in FIGS. 6 and 7 is a right angular threaded tie member with a bifurcated end (FIG. 6) to receive the free end of the tie member 52. The distal ends of the tie members 52 and 60 are secured together'by a nut and bolt 61. A suitable associated nut 53 and washer 54' preclude the tie member 60 from being raised out of the associated bushings 50 and 51. An associated stop 55 integral 'with the tie member 60 limits the downward movement of the tie member 60. A washer 56 is located between the associated bushing 51 and the stop 55. There is a close fit between the con,- fronting portion of the halves of the body 11 when bonded together, to form awater-tight seal. There is a limited vertical play in the movement of the tie rod 60.

Illustrated in FIGS. 8 and 9 is the shoe 10 used in conjunction with a sail. Toward this end, the body-11 is formed with the upright cylindrical wall 113. Supported in fixed relation in the cylindrical wall 11g is the lower bushing 50 of suitable material, such as nylon. Received by thelower bushing 50 is the upper bushing 51 of suitable material such as nylon. The confronting portions of the halves of the body 11 when bonded together form a water-tight seal. The top wall 11f is formed in the modified structure with a suitable opening for receiving the upper bushing 51.

Disposed within the bushing 50 and 51 is a vertically disposed threaded spar 70. A suitable nut 71 and washer 72 secure the spar 70 vertically to the body 11 within the bushings so and 51, while permitting rotation of the spar 70 within the bushings 50 and 51 about the axis of the spar 70. A stop 73 integral with the spar 70 limits the downward movement of the spar 70 and in conjunction with the nut 71 fixed the spar 70 to the body 11. A washer 74 is located between the bushing 51 and the stop 55. The foregoing elements form a water-tight seal between the body 11 and the spar 70. In the alternative, the stop member may be in the form of a cylindrical sleeve fixed to the body 11 forreceiving the spar 70.

The spar 70 has a verticaltubular post 76 telescopically connected thereto. Suitable twist type locking pins 75 lock the tubular post 76 to the spar 70. A lower and upper horizontal spar 77 and 77' are secured to the spar 70 by suitable clamps 78 and 78' to permit movement of the spar 77 in a vertical plane. The spars 70, 77, 77 and the tubular post 71 form a mast 80 which can be rotated about the axis of the spar 70 and the post 71 and in which the spar 77 can be moved in a horizontal plane about the axis of the bolt 78. A square sail 85-with lines secured to the horizontal spars 77 and 77' thereof are employed for setting the sail and for lowering the sail. Centrally of the sail 85 are cut ribbons to form a transparent window 86.

Illustratedin FIGS. 10l2 are three shoes 10 of the present invention secured together in a sideby-side relation as shown in FIGS. 6 and 7, but, illustrated in combination with a motor, propeller and steering mechanism to provide a motorized unit. Toward this end, transverse bars 92 are disposed in a depending manner and in abutting relation with the confronting side walls of the bodies 11 attached to the bars 92 are longitudinally extending brackets 93. The brackets 93 are secured to the bars 92 by nuts and bolts. The top wall of the body 11 is corrugated to add rigidity and compressive strength to the structure.

Supported by the top wall of the center body 11 is a suitable battery 100 such as a dry charge type standard 12 volt marine battery which has a removable watertight cover 112 which covers the battery 100. The rearwardly directed ends of the brackets 93 form a coupling 100 which supports a motor bracket 101. At-

tached to the bottom wall of the bracket 101 is a suitable motor 102 of the type sold by Sears and Roebuck Model No. 6B 5938C. A shaft 103 and propeller blades 104 project from the motor 102. A steering rod 110 is attached to the top wall of the motor bracket 101 to pivot the same relative to the coupling 100 of the brackets 93. Cables 111 connect the motor 102 to the battery 100.

6 Thus, the motor 102 is operated by the battery to rotate the shaft 103. The propeller blades 104 rotate with the shaft 103 to impel the shoes 10 of FIGS. 10-12. The steering rod is manually operated to pivot the motor bracket 101 in a horizontal plane,

which in turn changes the position of the motor 102 and the propeller blades 104 for steering the motorized unit.

Illustrated in FIGS. 13 and 14 is an inflatable shoe which is a modification of the shoe 10. The inflatable shoe 120 is similar to the shoe 10 with the exception that its body 121 is made ofa flexible material suitable for inflation. In the exemplary embodiment, the body 121 of the shoe 120 is made ofa rubberized neoprene material, or is made ofa nylon woven cloth material reinforced with neoprene rubber coating. In addition the top wall is corrugated and covered by a cloth of nylon or neoprene bonded on the corrugations to add rigidity and compression strength to the body 11 when inflated.

In inflating the body 121, a tank 122 of air under pressure or helium under pressure is detachably mounted to the body 121 by means of the members 35 at the bow of the body 11. Coupled to the outlet of the tank 122 is one end of a flexible coupling 125. Formed in the body 121 through the top wall 121a is a suitable opening 130. Seated in the opening in air-tight relation is a threaded tube 131. Threaded externally to the upper section of the tube 131 is a suitable housing 132. Coupled to an inlet of the housing 132 is the other end of the flexible coupling 125. Mounted in the housing 132 in internal threaded engagement with the tube 131 is a valve body 133. A longitudinally extending post 133a is formed in the valve body 133. Seated in the valve body 133 in threaded engagement therewith is a threaded tap or valve stem 134. By rotating the valve stem 134, the port 13321 of the valve body is either opened or closed. When the valve port 133a is initially opened by rotating the valve stem 134, air or gas under pressure flows from the tank 122 through the flexible coupling 125 through the valve housing 132, the valve body 133, the tube 131 and into the body 121 to inflate the body 121. The valve stem 134 is then rotated to close the port 133a and the flexible hose 125 is disconnected from the housing 132,

To deflate the body 121, the valve stem 134 is rotated to open the port 133a and air or gas under pressure escapes from the body 121 through the tube 131, the valve body 133, the port 133a and through the opening to which the flexible coupling 125 was previously attached.

In the alternative, a standard inner tube valve may be attached to an air pump for inflating the body 11.

I claim:

1. A shoe comprising:

a. a floatable elongated hollow body with the forward end thereof curved inwardly from side-to-side and. curved from top-to-bottom and with the rearward end thereof curved from side-to-side and curved from top-to-bottom to provide an uplifting action for said body while advancing along a path, said body being formed with a top wall, bottom wall and side walls;

b. forward bumpers fixed along the upper portion of the forward end of said body and continuing along the side walls of said body and rearward bumpers fixed along the upper portion of the rearward end of said body and continuing along the side walls of said body, said forward and rearward bumpers being formed with foil configurations for providing an uplifting action for said body while advancing along a path; and

c. foot securing means mounted on the top wall of said body for securing the foot of the wearer to said body.

2. A shoe as claimed in claim 1 wherein a recess is formed centrally of the forward end of said body with a gradual indentation for providing an uplifting action for said body.

3. A shoe as claimed in claim 1 and comprising loops of longitudinally spaced, transversely disposed ribs fixed to the interior of said body.

4. A shoe as claimed in claim 1 and comprising traction means disposed along the side walls of said body.

5. A shoe as claimed in claim 4 wherein said traction means comprises a rigid, curved wall which increases in dimension from the forward end toward the rearward end.

6. A shoe as claimed in claim 1 wherein said foot securing means comprises a toe pocket, a heel stop and ankle straps.

7. A shoe as claimed in claim 6 wherein said toe pocket comprises laterally spaced bands detachably connected at adjacent confronting longitudinal edges, and wherein said heel stop comprises a rigid wall.

8. A shoe as claimed in claim 1 and comprising handle-like securing means mounted on the side walls of said body for manual gripping and for the attachment of a line thereto.

9. A shoe as claimed in claim 8 and comprising handle-like securing means mounted on the top wall of said body for manual gripping and for the attachment of a line thereto.

10. A shoe as claimed in claim 1 and comprising longitudinally extending, transversely spaced runners fixed to the bottom wall of said body and extending along the forward end of said body and the rearward end of said body.

11. A shoe as claimed in claim 1 wherein said bottom wall is flat from side-to-side to facilitate movement over the path of travel.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1719059 *May 31, 1928Jul 2, 1929Colestin KrupkaWater glide shoe
US2165547 *Dec 16, 1936Jul 11, 1939Hill Cortlandt TFoot attachment for skis and the like
US2707789 *May 13, 1953May 10, 1955Brown Marvin WPontoon water skates
US2997299 *Oct 22, 1959Aug 22, 1961Polyco IncFloating riding device
US3108296 *Jun 16, 1960Oct 29, 1963Smith Charles Aquila VincentWater skates
US3388908 *Nov 20, 1964Jun 18, 1968Ferdinand P. RuckWater skiing apparatus
DE647760C *Apr 12, 1935Jul 12, 1937Max NeumannWasserski
FR1015043A * Title not available
FR1095277A * Title not available
FR1266279A * Title not available
GB959272A * Title not available
IT633436A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4301562 *Aug 18, 1978Nov 24, 1981Duerr MaxDevice for water-sports
US4527984 *May 3, 1984Jul 9, 1985Serge GilbertWater skis and oaring sticks
US4698039 *Oct 24, 1986Oct 6, 1987Watson Benjamin HApparatus for walking on water or land
US4985006 *Jun 22, 1989Jan 15, 1991Brunet Roberto LAquatic recreational equipment
US5421759 *Feb 2, 1994Jun 6, 1995Morin; RobertDynamically balanced bouyant skis
US6050003 *Aug 19, 1997Apr 18, 2000Chu; YoungBoot with outside preformed stress relief
US20140148071 *Jan 29, 2014May 29, 2014Kelly K. SouterApparatus for walking and resting upon the water
Classifications
U.S. Classification441/77
International ClassificationB63B35/83, A63C13/00
Cooperative ClassificationB63B35/83, A63C13/005, A63C2203/16, A63C13/001
European ClassificationA63C13/00F, A63C13/00B, B63B35/83