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Publication numberUS3777699 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 11, 1973
Filing dateDec 13, 1971
Priority dateDec 13, 1971
Publication numberUS 3777699 A, US 3777699A, US-A-3777699, US3777699 A, US3777699A
InventorsF Pfleger
Original AssigneeF Pfleger
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Tennis scoring device
US 3777699 A
Abstract
A scoring device for the game of tennis which accumulates and indicates the scoring for the game which is divided into and known as point score and game score. Scoring in tennis requires both an additive mode of operation for accumulating point score and accumulating game score, and a subtractive mode of operation for point scoring under certain tie score conditions. The scoring device therefore comprises an input member and a totalize register for sequentially adding the point score until sufficient points have been accumulated to win the game. In advancing the point score register into the game winning indication, the game totalizing register automatically advances to the next indication. The point score register is capable of the additive and the subtractive movements by selective movement of the input member.
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1451 Dec. 11, 1973 United States Patent 1191 Pfleger 1 TENNIS SCORING DEVICE [76] Inventor: Frederick W. Pfleger, 1152 Barbara Primary Examinerlouis Capozi Dr., Cherry Hill, NJ. 08034 Dec. 13, 1971 ABSTRACT [22] Filed:

[21] Appl. No.: 207,513 A scoring device for the game of tennis which accumulates and indicates the scoring for the game which is divided into and known as point score and game score. Scoring in tennis requires both an additive mode of operation for accumulating point score and [51] Int. A63b 71/06 1 d b d f [58] Field 61 Search............................ 116/120 133- atng w a i 6 273/29 73 235/1 B 111 operatlon for point scorlng under certain tie score conditions. The scoring device therefore comprises an input member and a totalize register for sequentially adding the point score until sufficient points have been accumulated to win the game. In advancing the point score register into the game winning indication, the game totalizing register automatically advances to References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 8/1939 Paul............ 2,856,888 10/1958 3,122,851

the next indication. The point score register is capable Strunk of the additive and the subtractive movements by selective movement of the input member.

:5 Claims, 9 Drawing Figures PATENIEDMc 1 1 an SHEET 1 [F PIT/L699 PATENIEnnEc 1 1 197a SHEET 2 U? 2 1 TENNIS SCORING DEVICE BACKGROUND OF INVENTION This invention relates to an automatic scoring device for sports events, more particular it relates to a scoring device as would be used in the game of tennis. Although many types of scoring devices are readily known and are on the market, the game of tennis requires a unique type of scoring device in that scoring for the game of tennis is quite different from the scoring as used in golf, baseball, bowling, football and other sporting events, in which the scoring is always an additive function. In the game of tennis, the scoring is additive and subtractive and involves totalizing game scores which result from an accumulation of a given member of point scores. The sequence of point scoring consists of love, which means zero, 30, 40", ADD and GAME. In the 404O tie condition of tennis, which is normally called DUCE, the scoring from this score of the game can be both additive or subtractive. As a result, it must be possible for any scoring device at this point in scoring to be able to add a point or subtract a point. The addition of two points past the 4040 score results in the winning of the game. In a scoring device of this type, and according to normal terminology used in the game of tennis, the scoring registered after 40-40 is known as the ADD point, and the following point which must be successive by the player that advanced to ADD, is the game point. At the point accumulation representing GAME, the games registered advances one indication. If a player reaches 40 and wins the next point before his opponent reaches 40, the first player wins the game on this next point and he does not have to win two successive points after 40 as in the DUCE situation. As a result, the scoring device must be capable of moving these two steps with little difficulty.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION It is an object of this invention to provide a scoring device which is capable of registering the GAME and POINT scores for the game of tennis.

It is another object ofthis invention to provide a scoring device for the game of tennis for keeping score of both the player and his opponent.

It is another object of this invention to provide a scoring device for the game of tennis that is small enough so that the device can be worn on the wrist ofa player or be attached to the tennis racket.

It is another object of this invention to provide a scoring device for the game oftennis which not only is small enough in size, but will be light in weight.

It is another object of this invention to provide a scoring device for the game of tennis which is simple to operate and easy to read.

It is another object of this invention to provide a scoring device for the game of tennis which is simple in structure, reliable and reasonable to manufacture.

These and other objects of this invention will become more apparent when read in light of the following drawings, descriptions and appended claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWING FIG. 1 is a plane view of the device showing the score indication arrangement.

FIG. 2 is a cross section through the scoring device substantially along line 11 of FIG. 1 which shows the arrangement of the point score registers in normal positron.

FIG. 3 is a sectional view through the scoring device substantially along line 22" of FIG. 1 which shows the game scoring registers in normal position.

FIG. 4 is a fragmented section through the scoring device substantially along line 33 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 5 is a plane view of the base of the device showing two segments in their respective channels.

FIG. 6 is a bottom view of the cover of the device showing two segments in their respective channels.

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of the separator disc which divides the base from the cover.

FIG. 8 is a perspective view of one type of segment.

FIG. 9 is a perspective view of the other type of segment inverted to show the bottom of the segment.

DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENT As shown in FIGS. 1, 5 & 6 the tennis scoring device consists of a base 200, a cover and two moveable point score arcurate segments 110 and 111. The arcurate segments are imprinted with the necessary characters for the scoring ofa tennis game. The cover 100 has four window openings 101, 102, 103 and 104. In each of these four windows appears the character representing a particular score. The two window openings 101 and 103 on the horizontal axis indicate the POINT score, whereas the two window openings I02 and 104, FIG. 1, on the vertical axis indicate the GAME score. As shown in FIG. 1 adjacent to the window openings I01, 102, 103 and 104 are handles I05, 106, I07 and 108 respectively which are used to move the arcurate segments 112, 110, 113, and 111 respectively. As a result, handles 105 and 107 are the point score operating handles and handles I06 and 108 are the game score operating handles.

As shown in FIG. 1, the scores of one team are located at the right and at the top. The scores of the opponents are located at the left and at the bottom. The operating handles 105, 106, 107 and 108 are shown in FIGS. 1, 5 & 6 in the normal game starting position when the starting scores are registered in the windows 101, 102, 103 and 104 respectively. The point score operating handles 105 and 107 are moveable in a counter-clockwise direction, FIG. 1 & 5, such that the successive characters 15, 30, 40 A & G shown dotted, appear in sequence in the related window 101 and 103. These same handles are moved clockwise to reset the point score arcurate segments. The game score handles 106 and 108 shown located adjacent to window 102 and 104 in FIG. 1 are for resetting the game score arcurate segments when the tennis set is completed. These game score handles 106, 108 can also be used to preset certain indications under special conditions such as handicaps. As will be described later, a game score arcurate segment is automatically advanced counterclockwise one position at the conclusion of each game, that is, when a point score indicator advances to the G or game indication. The successive game score indications l,2,3,4,5,6,7 and 8 are also shown dotted in FIG. 1.

In order to ensure that the various arcurate segments will be retained in any set position, a detent mechanism cooperates with detent teeth on the individual segments. As shown in FIG. 6, the game score arcurate segments 110 and 111 are located in the guide channel 100 formed as part of cover 100, whereas as shown in FIG. 5, the point score arcurate segments 112, 113 are located in a guide channel 200 formed as part of base 200. In order to retain the various arcurate segments in their channels since the channels have the same dimensions, a separator disc 120, FIGS. 2,3, & 7 is mounted between the cover 100 and the base 200. This disc, the cover and the base can be oriented with respect to each other with pins 140 made to fit holes 141 in the separator disc 120 and holes 142 in base 200. As shown in FIG. 2 & 7, the separator disc 120 is provided with openings 121 and 122 located in alignment with windows 101 and 103 to permit viewing of the characters imprinted on the point score arcurate segments 112 and 113.

Located in the openings 12 1 and 122 but out of view from windows 101 and 103 of the plane separator disc 120 are flexible detent arms 116 and 117. These arms are formed at their free end into aV shape detent portion 116 and 117 respectively as shown in FIGS. 3 & 7 which engage V shape notches 112 and 113' of the point score arcurate segments 112 and 113. The V shape portion of the flexible arms 116 and 117 therefore detent the point score arcurate segments 112 and '1 13 in any set position when the V shape portions 116 and 117' are engaged with the notches 112' and 113. Located 90 from the flexible detent arms 116 and 117 are a second set of flexible detent arms 118 and 119. These arms are identical to the flexible detentarms 116 and 117 except that the V shape portion 118' and 119' respectively is formed into an upward extending direction, see FIGS. 2 & 7. These V shape projections act with V notches 110 and 111' on the bottom surface of the game score arcurate segments 110 and 111 respectively. As a result, the game score arcurate segments 110 and 111 are detented in any set position by the V shape portion 118 and 119' when they are in engagement with the V notches 110' and 111'. Since the detents are V shaped, the arcurate segments are releasibly held in any set position, but they can be moved to another set position by movement of the respective handle. As a result, all arcurate segments are capable of bidirectional movement to any setable position.

As was previously mentioned, a game score arcurate segment 110 or 111 must be advanced one position, each time the related point score indicator advances to the character G indication. In order to accomplish this, the game score indicators 110 and 111 are provided with a second set of notches 110" and 111" respectively on their lower surfaces. These notches as shown in FIGS. 6 & 9 are spaced radially in relationship with the V shaped notches 110' and 111 such that for each advancing notch 110 and 111, there is a corresponding detent notch 110' or 111. Mounted to the point score arcurate segments I12 and 113 are springs I26 and 127, FIG. 5, respectively. These springs normally engage the lower surface of the separator disc 120 and are at that position in their deflected position. As a point score arcurate segment advances to the G indication, the spring flexes into the opening 123 or 124 of the separator disc 120. The spring deflects far enough into the opening to engage a notch 110" or 111" to advance the respective game score arcurate segment one position as the point score arcurate segment is advanced to the G" indication position. The amount of movement given to the game score arcurate segment is controlled by the amount of movement imparted to the point score arcurate segments after the spring 126 or 127 engages the notches or 111". The point of engagement is controlled by the position of the leading edge of the opening 123 or 124.

In order to assure that the arcurate segments can only move within the limits as required to display the full complement of characters, stop lugs are provided which limit the clockwise and counter-clockwise movement of the arcurate segments. These lugs are shown as ending 210, 211, 212, 213, FIG. 5, of a portion of the guide ring of the Base 200 and as ending 150, 151, 152 and 153 of the guide ring of cover 100.

As was previously described, the path of movement of the various segments 110, 111, I12 and 113 when they are being operated by the handles 105, 106, 107 and 108 is circular since they are located in circular channels. It is to be understood that an in line, straight line movement could be substituted for this design.

From the foregoing it is seen that a structure has been fully described which provides for the recording and presentation of both the game scores and the point scores for a player and his opponent as is required in the game of tennis and which meets the stated objects of the invention.

Although this invention has been described in some detail by way of illustration and description, it is understood that certain changes and modifications may be made within the spirit of the invention and scope of the following claims.

I claim:

1. In a tennis scoring device comprising a cover enclosure including a first guide means, a base enclosure including a second guide means, viewing means in said cover enclosure located in relation to said first and second guide means, a pair of moveable game score indicator members moveably mounted with one of said guide means, game score indecia on said game score indicator members, a pair of moveable point score indicator members moveably mounted with the other of said guide means, point score indecia on said point score indicator members, said game and point score indicia selectively viewable in said viewing means, a stationary separator member position between said cover enclosure and said base enclosure and aligned therewith, detenting means for said game score indicator members and said point score indicator members comprising yieldable mating configurations between a portion of said moveable game score indicator members, said point score indicator members and a stationary portion of said device, advancing means for advancing said game score indicator members comprising a drive element mounted to said point score indicator members and cooperating with a stationary portion of said device to selectively cooperate with a portion of said game score indicator members for incremental advancement of said game score members, and manual means on each of said game score indicator members for incremental movement of said members.

2. In a tennis scoring device according to claim 1 wherein said yieldable mating configuration of said detenting means comprises a V shaped portion on yieldable arms on said separator-member and V shaped detenting teeth on said portion of said game score and point score indicator members.

3. In a tennis scoring device according to claim 1 wherein said drive element on said point score indicators comprises a spring loaded driver element and said portion of said game score indicator members com prises drive teeth engageable by said spring loaded drive element.

4. In a tennis scoring device according to claim 1 wherein said first guide means in said cover enclosure comprises a guide channel, said second guide means in said base enclosure comprises a guide channel, said guide channels being substantially equal in size, said separator member being a plate to retain said point score indicator members and said game score indicator members in said guide channels, said manual means comprising handles projecting beyond the confines of said cover enclosure.

permit viewing said point score indecia.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1985652 *Mar 18, 1933Dec 25, 1934Harry P CampbellTennis scoring device
US2168743 *Mar 23, 1938Aug 8, 1939Paul Ralph HerbertTennis scoring device
US2856888 *Aug 25, 1955Oct 21, 1958Justin R StrunkTire change and lube indicator device
US3122851 *Oct 5, 1961Mar 3, 1964Manlio O SepeScoring device
IT651605A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4050400 *May 17, 1976Sep 27, 1977Nelson TattonMarine navigation instrument
US4149330 *Apr 18, 1977Apr 17, 1979Huff Gerald BDigital instant schedule computer
US4158342 *Aug 25, 1978Jun 19, 1979Scruggs Jack EScoring device
US4165710 *May 10, 1978Aug 28, 1979John GaetanoTennis score keeping device
US4172595 *Apr 10, 1978Oct 30, 1979Sewell J TerryTennis tally
US4189143 *Aug 3, 1977Feb 19, 1980Auken John A VanTennis scorekeeper
US4331098 *Sep 30, 1976May 25, 1982Aldo RubanoTennis score keeper
US4470273 *May 7, 1982Sep 11, 1984Needle Industries LimitedRow counter
US6210296 *Aug 4, 1999Apr 3, 2001Wendell J. GabrielPortable tennis scorekeeper device
US6634548 *Mar 21, 2001Oct 21, 2003Robert D. BowmanTennis pal
US7517293Jul 17, 2006Apr 14, 2009Smith Timothy VCombination tennis scoring and dampening device
US20070032893 *Jul 25, 2006Feb 8, 2007Katie LowranWearable electronic scorekeeping device
DE9206593U1 *May 13, 1992Oct 1, 1992Sander, Dirk, 4048 Grevenbroich, DeTitle not available
EP0024552A1 *Jul 24, 1980Mar 11, 1981Hans KleindienstPortable score indicator
Classifications
U.S. Classification116/223, 235/113, 116/315, 273/148.00R
International ClassificationA63B71/06
Cooperative ClassificationA63B2071/0663, A63B71/0672
European ClassificationA63B71/06D8B