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Publication numberUS3777800 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 11, 1973
Filing dateDec 30, 1971
Priority dateDec 30, 1971
Publication numberUS 3777800 A, US 3777800A, US-A-3777800, US3777800 A, US3777800A
InventorsSusoev Y
Original AssigneeSusoev Y
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Roman shade and method of fabrication
US 3777800 A
Abstract
A Roman-type shade and method of fabrication. The fabric of the shade is formed into a series of horizontally extending, vertically spaced parallel folds which carry flexible battens adapted to rigidly hold the folds when the shade is hung and which permit cleaning of the shade without removal of the battens. In one embodiment the battens are secured within the folds by a line of stitching which extends through both the fabric and battens and with rearwardly extending marginal portions of the battens formed with openings and eyelets adapted to receive pull-cords arranged in a manner to raise and lower the shade. In another embodiment a line of stitching in the folds forms pockets for receiving the battens and with openings formed in certain battens for seating grommets which both receive the pull-cords and anchor the battens within the pockets. In the method, batten locations are marked on the fabric with portions of the fabric along the length of each mark secured to one flat side of individual battens by adhesive means. In adjacent portion of the fabric is then folded over and secured in overlying relationship with the opposite side of the batten by adhesive means. Lines of stitching are then formed to extend through the fabric and into the battens. Openings are formed in the battens and adjacent fold portions with eyelets seated in the openings to receive the pull-cords.
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United States Patent [1 1 Susoev [111 3,777,800 [4 1 Dec. 11, 1973 ROMAN SHADE AND METHOD OF FABRICATION [76] Inventor: Yasha A. Susoev, 151 Union St., San

Anselmo, Calif. 94111 [22] Filed: Dec. 30, 1971 {21] Appl. No.: 214,015

[52] 11.8. CI. 160/84 R, 160/330 [51] Int. Cl A47b 5/00 [58] Field of Search 160/84 R, 330; 156/93, 202, 216

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,086,216 4/1963 Brooks et a1 156/93 2,813,054 11/1957 Nicholas 156/93 1,752,610 4/1930 McSpadden 160/84 R 3,132,687 5/1964 Potye 160/348 3,632,154 l/1972 Woodrich 160/330 3,195,616 7/1965 Taber 160/238 FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 204,800 8/1939 Switzerland 160/84 R Primary Examiner-Peter M. Caun Attorney-Paul D. Flehr et a1.

[57] ABSTRACT A Roman-type shade and method of fabrication. The

fabric of the shade is formed into a series of horizontally extending, vertically spaced parallel folds which carry flexible battens adapted to rigidly hold the folds when the shade is hung and which permit cleaning of the shade without removal of the battens. In one embodiment the battens are secured within the folds by a line of stitching which extends through both the fabric and battens and with rearwardly extending marginal portions of the battens formed with openings and eyelets adapted to receive pull-cords arranged in a manner to raise and lower the shade. In another embodiment a line of stitching in the folds forms pockets for receiving the battens and with openings formed in certain battens for seating grommets which both receive the pull-cords and anchor the battens within the pockets. In the method, batten locations are marked on the fabric with portions of the fabric along the length of each mark secured to one flat side of individual battens by adhesive means. In adjacent portion of the fabric is then folded over and secured in overlying relationship with the opposite side of the batten by adhesive means. Lines of stitching are then formed to extend through the fabric and into the battens. Openings are formed in the battens and adjacent fold portions with eyelets seated in the openings to receive the pullcords.

13 Claims, 9 Drawing Figures 1 ROMAN SHADE AND METHOD OF FABRICATION BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to shades of the type generically termed Roman shades and which are specially characterized in being opened and closed by means of progressively raising and lowering the fabric of the shade from the bottom margin.

Roman shades of conventional design employ means such as wooden slats attached on the concealed side of the shade in an attempt to maintain straightness in the folds formed in the fabric. Conventional Roman shades are awkward to handle and require complete disassembly of the shade, including removal of the slats, for cleaning the fabric. The disassembly and reassembly of the shade for cleaning purposes is a difficult and time consuming task. Moreover, in conventional Roman shades the folds are not well retained and do not provide the desirable crispness of appearance.

OBJECTS AND SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION It is a general object of the invention to provide a new and improved Roman-type shade construction and method of fabrication.

Another object is to provide a shade construction in which the fabric is formed into a plurality of horizontally extending, vertically spaced folds and with flexible battens carried within the folds. The battens are formed of a material adapted to provide sufficient flexibility to permit laundering or dry cleaning of the shade without removal of the battens, and in which the battens return by the action of plastic memory to their initial rigid configuration when the shade is re-hung.

Another object is to provide a method of fabrication for a Roman-type shade of the character described in which the fabric is initially marked for indicating predetermined batten locations, a first portion of the fabric along the length of each mark is secured to one side of the battens by an adhesive and a second portion of the fabric is folded into overlying relationship with the other side of the batten and secured thereto by an adhesive. In one embodiment means is provided securing the battens within the folds of the fabric by a line of stitching along the length of each fold and extending into the battens. In another embodiment the stitching forms pockets for receiving the battens.

Another object is to provide a Roman-type shade construction of the character described adapted for convenient and fast assembly and disassembly for cleaning purposes. The shade includes quick release fastener means formed at the upper margin of the shade for securing the same to a fixture, battens formed of a flexible material mounted in horizontally extending folds of the fabric, a hem weight retained within a lowermost pocket of the fabric by a quick-release flap, and pull-cord means extending through aligned openings and eyelets provided in the battens.

Additional objects and features of the invention will appear from the following description in which the preferred embodiments of the invention have been set forth in detail in conjunction with the drawing.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 2 is an elevational view of the rearward side of the shade of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a side elevational view of the shade of FIG.

FIG. 4 is an enlarged fragmentary view in cross section taken along the line 4-4 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary section view taken along the line 55 of FIG. 4;

FIG. 6 is a view similar to FIG. 3 illustrating the shade drawn into raised position;

FIG. 7 is an enlarged fragmentary view of the shade of FIG. 1 illustrating the releasable flap for the weighted hem pocket;

FIG. 8 is a fragmentary view in vertical cross section of another embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 9 is a fragmentary view in section taken along the line 9-9 of FIG. 8.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS In the drawings FIGS. 1 3 illustrate generally at 10 a preferred embodiment of the Roman-type shade of the invention. The shade 10 is fabricated of a suitable fabric 12, preferably a flameproof fabric such as fiberglass material or the like, although any suitable fabric of the type commonly utilized for shades may be employed. A plurality of horizonially extending, vertically spaced folds 14, 16, 18 are formed in the fabric providing the characteristic appearance of a Roman shade. Quick-release fastener means 20 is provided along the upper margin of the fabric for attaching and hanging the shade to the desired fixture 22. Means is provided for raising and lowering the shade progressively from the lower portion of the fabric and in the illustrated embodiment this means comprises the pull-cord operating means 24. A weighted hem pocket 26 is provided at the lower margin of the fabric for holding down the fabric and to provide a straight and crisp appearance when the shade is hung.

Each of the folds 14, 16 and 18 are provided with horizontal elongate flat battens 28, 30 specially adapted with sufficient rigidity to hold the folds in straight configuration when the shade is hung, and with flexing ability and plastic memory for resilient return to permit machine cleaning of the shade as by laundering or dry cleaning without the requirement for removing the battens. The battens are fabricated with a suitable combination of thickness and material selection to provide these properties. Preferably the batten material is a synthetic polymer such as one of the thermoplastic. resins. The polymer sold under the tradename Lexan by the General Electric Company and which is a thermoplastic polycarbonate condensation product of bisphenol-A and phosgene is one preferred material in that in addition to the foregoing properties it provides a high degree of impact resistance for withstanding-the stresses encountered during the sewing operations and laundering or dry-cleaning of the completed shade, is

' fire proof, is translucent so that the batten easily takes on the color characteristics of the particular fabric it is used with, does not discolor or degrade with age or heat, has a relative high melting temperature as compared to other resins, and does not twist or ripple with the application of heat such as from an iron, for example. Other resins such as polyvinyl chloride may also be utilized with the invention. The batten thickness preferably is 20 mil, and should be substantially within the range of 15-30 mil. Where the batten is too thin then the proper rigidity is not maintained, and where it is too thick then it is difficult to stitch through without breaking the sewing needles.

The shade is fabricated in a method which includes forming the battens from strips of stock material into the width size desired for the particular job specification. ln the embodiment as shown in FIG. 4 and 5 the width of each batten is sized so that a front portion 34 projects between the opposed portions of fabric fold 18 while a rear portion 36 forms a margin which extends rearwardly of the folds. The end edges of each batten are bevelled as at 32 to eliminate objectionable sharp corners. Batten locations are marked or ruled out on the fabric at predetermined spaced-apart dimensions. A portion of the fabric extending along each mark is secured to one side of front batten portion 34 by adhesive means such as a layer of white glue. The portion of the adjacent fabric extending along the other side of the mark is then folded over into overlying relationship with the rear margin of the batten and secured thereto by the adhesive means. After this folding operation is completed heat and pressure may be applied to the folds by suitable means such as an iron to ensure that the fabric remains secured to the battens. A line of stitching as at 38 is then sewn through both the opposed portions of the fabric and the material of the battens along the-length of battens adjacent the edges of the folds. This stitching serves to prevent the formation of a wavy appearance in the folds when the shade is hung, such as would otherwise occur where, for example, a sheer fabric is employed. As desired suitable adhesive material may be utilized for permanently securing the fabric fold portions to the surfaces of the battens, thereby eliminating the described line of stitching. 35

An alternate method of assembly would include the provision of layers of contact-type adhesive on both sides of the battens along front margin 34 with a protection peel-off strip covering the adhesive layer. After the fabric is marked for the batten locations the peeloff strips is removed to expose the adhesive and facilitate securing the battens to the fold portions.

Where a batten may be initially applied out of alignment during assembly then the method facilitates immediate correction of the error through the simple step ofseparating the fabric from the surface of the batten and repositioning the batten in proper alignment on the fabric,- with application of additional adhesive where necessary.

The rear portion 36 of each batten is formed with a plurality, shown as four, of openings 40. A guide or metal eyelet 42 is seated within each opening. The eyelets 42 provide a central opening for guiding one of the four vertically extending pull-cords 44, preferably of nylon material, of operating means 24. The upper ends of the pull-cords are trained in a strand through rings 46 fastened below fixture 22. The strand of pull-cords is then tied in a knot 48 of a size preventing the knot from being pulled through the first ring, with a suitable handle 50 secured to the end of the strand. The lower ends of each of the cords are formed into a slip knot 52 of a size sufficient to prevent the knotfrom being drawn upwardly through the lower eyelet 42. The shade is progressively raised from its lower end by pulling down on the handle thereby progressively drawing the battens upwardly with the fabric between the battens folding downwardly as illustrated in FIG. 6. The

shade is secured in raised position by suitable fastener means, not shown, adapted to releasably hold the strand of pull-cords. The slip knots 52 may be easily untied permitting the pull-cords to be completely drawn through the eyelets and rings for disassembly of the shade for cleaning purposes. As desired, the shade operating means would be power operated as by providing a motorized drum upon which the upper ends of the cords are wound.

The side edges of the fabric are formed into hems 54, 56 by means of folding back the edges of the fabric and sewing lines of stitching at 58 and 60. Alternatively, these side hems may be eliminated by employing a fabric of the type formed with an overlock type edge. The weighted hern pocket 26 is formed by folding back the lower edge of the fabric and sewing'a line of stitching at 62. A weight 54 such as a wooden or metal rod, is captured in pocket 26 by sewing one end of the pocket closed and by providing quick-release flap means 66 at the other end of the pocket. This flap means preferably comprises the fastener means sold under the trade name Velcro and comprising a strip 66 of outwardly projecting rows of small plastic hooks and an opposing strip 68 of a felt-like material. The pocket is closed by pressing the flap together so that the Velcro strips interengage, and the pocket is quickly opened for removing the rod by merely pulling the Velcro strips apart.

The quick release fastener means 20 for securing the upper margin of the shade to the fixture preferably comprises Velcro strips of the type described above. Thus, a strip 70 comprising rows of small plastic books is mounted to the surface of fixture 22 and an opposing strip 72 of felt-like material is secured as by sewing to the backside of the upper margin of the shade. The shade is thus adapted to be quickly hung by pressing the strip 72 against the opposing strip 70 on the fixture, and the shade may be quickly disassembled for cleaning purposes by merely pulling the two strips apart. Alternatively, other quick-release fastener means such as snap-tapes may be employed in place of the described Velcro strips. I

The backside of the shade can be covered with a separate layer of fabric to conceal the exposed portions of the battens from view. This construction,.not shown, could include a method of assembly similar. to that described above in which folds formed in the separate fabric layer are secured to the exposed portions of the battens by suitable adhesive and/or stitching.

The embodiment of FIG. 1 7 may also include a construction in which alternate wide and narrow battens are secured into the folds of the fabric. In this construction, not shown, the fabric would be formed with folds which alternately project on front and rear sides of the shades. The battens of relatively small width would be secured completely within the folds which project rearwardly of the shade while the front portions of the wider battens would be secured within the forwardly projecting folds, with each batten stitched in place as described above. Openings and eyelets would be provided in aligned rows through both the small battens and the rearportions of the wide battens. Suitable pull-cord means, a weighted hem pocket, and quickrelease attachment means for the shade would be provided as previously described.

FIGS. 8 and 9 illustrate features of an embodiment of the invention incorporating a shade 74 formed with folds which alternately project on front and rear sides.

The fabric 76 of the shade is first marked with horizontally extending vertically spaced batten locations. The fabric is then formed with a plurality of folds 78 on the front side of the shade alternating with folds 80 on the rearward side. Lines of stitching at 82 and 84 are sewn along the folds to form pockets for receiving the battens. Horizontally elongate flexible battens 86, 88 are positioned in the batten pockets, and the battens are formed of a suitable synthetic polymer material providing the properties described above which achieve a straight and crisp appearance for the folds when the shade is hung and yet permit cleaning without the requirement of removing the battens.

The sectional view of FIG. 9 illustrates details of the means for securing battens 86 against lengthwise displacement within the pockets of front folds 78. The line of stitching at 90 forms a hem 92 at each side edge of the shade. Prior to insertion of the batten within the pocket suitable openings 94 are formed at the batten ends. With the battens positioned in the pockets stitching 96 is sewn through hem 92 and the batten openings to anchor the batten within the pocket.

The battens 88 within the pockets of rearward folds 80 are anchored against lengthwise displacement by means of forming pull-cord openings 98 in aligned rows through'the battens and fabric. Metal grommets 100 are then seated through the openings. Pull-cords 102 are trained through the grommets with their lower ends secured to suitable means such as metal rings, not shown, of a size larger than the grommet openings so that the shade can be progressively raised by drawing on the strand of cords.

While the embodiments herein are at present considered to be preferred it will be understood that numerous variations and modifications may be made therein by those skilled in the art and it is intended to cover in the appended claims all such variations and modifications as fall within the true spirit and scope of the invention.

I claim:

1. In a shade device, the combination comprising at least one layer of fabric, a plurality of horizontally extending, vertically spaced U-shaped folds formed in said fabric layer, the folds having facing planar sides, a plurality of horizontally disposed elongate flexible battens, each batten having an initial planar configuration and being formed of an elastomeric material providing substantial flexing under stress and further providing plastic memory affording resilient return to said initial planar configuration upon removal of said stress, each of said battens being carried between the sides of individuals ones of said folds and extending the substantial length thereof, means fixedly securing each of the battens within the fold associated therewith, and means to vertically raise and lower the shade progressively from the lowermost portion thereof.

2. A shade as in claim 1 wherein the means securing the battens within the folds comprises adhesive means disposed between the outer surfaces of said battens and the confronting surfaces of the portions of the layer forming said folds.

3. A shade as in claim 1 wherein said means securing the battens within respective folds includes at least one line of stitching extending along the length of said folds,

said stitching securing together opposing portions of the layer forming said folds.

4. A shade as in claim 3 wherein said stitching ex tends through the opposed layer portions and is secured into the adjacent batten.

S. A shade as in claim 4 in which at least certain ones of said battens are formed with marginal portions which extend rearwardly of said folds, and said means to raise and lower the shade includes pull-cord means and a plurality of openings formed in the marginal portions of said battens, said openings being arranged in two or more rows of vertically aligned openings with said pull-cord means extending vertically through said aligned openings, and together with means for restraining the lowermost portions of said pull-cord means for vertical movement with a lower portion of the shade.

6. A shade as in claim 3 in which said means securing the battens within the folds further includes adhesive means disposed between the outer surfaces of the battens and the confronting surfaces of portions of the layer forming said folds.

7. A shade as in claim 1 in which at least certain ones of said battens are formed with marginal portions which extend rearwardly of the folds.

8. A shade as in claim 1 in which said battens are formed of a synthetic polymer material having a thickness in the range between substantially l5 and 30 mil providing rigidity for holding said folds in substantially horizontal planar configuration and parallel alignment when the shade is hung.

9. A shade as in claim 3 in which said stitching secures together opposed portions of said folds into horizontally extending pockets, and said battens are disposed within individual one of said pockets.

10. A shade as in claim 9 in which said means securing the battens within the folds includes a plurality of openings formed through at least certain ones of said pockets and the battens associated therewith and grommet means disposed in said openings for securing together the portions of the fold and batten surrounding respective openings, and the means to raise and lower the shade includes pull-cord means extending vertically through the grommet means.

11. A shade as in claim 9 in which the means securing the battens within the folds includes stitch means extending through the folds at opposed ends of said pockets for restraining respective battens therein from longitudinal displacement.

12. A shade as in claim 1 which includes means forming a horizontally elongate hem pocket at the lower margin of said layer, weight means disposed in said pocket, and means forming a flap at an end of said hem pocket including means to releasably open and close said flap for inserting and removing said weight into and from said pocket.

13. A shade as in claim 12 for quick release from and attachment to a support fixture, and including means forming opposed strips of interengageable, selectively releasable fastener means, one of said strips being secured to said fixture and the other of said strips being secured to the upper margin of said shade whereby said strips when pressed into confronting relationship attach the shade to the fixture.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE a n. w n -r CLRTK: LCATL OF CORRLCTJLON Patent No- 3,777,800 Dated December 11. 1973 Inventofls) I YASHA A. SUSOEV rs in the above-identified patent It is certified that error appea by corrected as shown below:

and that said Letters Patent are here 1 In paragraph I761" of the cover page the correct Inventor's address is as follows:

Yasha A. Susoev 151 Union Street k San Francisco, California 94111 Signed and sealed this 23rd day of April 19m.

(SEAL) Attest:

MARSHALL DAMN Commissioner of Patents EDX' IARD I- LFLE GMSRJR. Attssting Officer

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Classifications
U.S. Classification160/84.4, 160/368.1, 428/100, 160/330
International ClassificationA47H23/00, A47H23/01
Cooperative ClassificationA47H23/01, A47H2201/02
European ClassificationA47H23/01