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Publication numberUS3778951 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 18, 1973
Filing dateNov 30, 1970
Priority dateNov 28, 1969
Also published asCA944577A1, DE2058638A1
Publication numberUS 3778951 A, US 3778951A, US-A-3778951, US3778951 A, US3778951A
InventorsOroschakoff G
Original AssigneeOroschakoff G
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Reinforcement
US 3778951 A
Abstract
At least one pair of reinforcing sections are provided, each of which has at least two dimensions and which interengage to form a self-supporting reinforcement which is rigid at least in one direction.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 11 1 Oroschakoff Dec. 18, 1973 REINFORCEMENT 2,787,198 4/1957 White 52/660 [76] Inventor: Georgi Oroschakoff, l urp y 5/ simon Denk-Gasse wien Austria 193,590 1 1/1957 Austria 52/664 1,132,311 6/1962 Germany 52/664 [22] F1169: 1970 179,885 10/1954 Austria 1 52/664 [2 Appl Na: 93 22 216,728 8/1961 Austria 52/664 859,728 9 1940 France 52/664 1,234,326 5/1960 France 52/648 [30] Foreign Application Priority Data 1,341,305 9/1963 France 1 52/648 NW 28 1969 Austria 463,754 11/1968 Switzerland 52/662 52 us. c1 52/646, 52/652 52/662 Sutherland 51 1111. C1. E04h 12/18, EO4C 2/42 army-Karl [58] Field of Search 52/648, 650, 645,

52/664, 662, 630, 694, 646, 651, 652 [57] ABSTRACT At least one pair of reinforcing sections are provided, [56] Referen e Cited each of which has at least two dimensions and which UNITED STATES PATENTS interengage to form a self-supporting reinforcement 874,881 12 1907 Baker 52 694 wh'ch at least One dlrecuon' 1,051,126 l/l913 Lachman 52/662 3 Claims, 98 Drawing Figures PATENTEU DEC 18 I973 SIEEI Olllf 11 INVENTQR. CR 053k FLA; I. U

PATENTEDDEE 18 1915 3.778.951 sum 02 or 11 BY Ck PATENTEU DEC 18 I975 SNEEI [W "F 1 1 FIG. 37a

INVENTOR. GEORGI OROSCHAKOFF ATTORNEY PATENIEUnEc 1 8 ma SHEEI OSUF 11 FIG. 50a

INVENTOR. I ORUSUQ 10F? GEORG yaw-l ATTOQNEY PAIENIED DEC 1 8 I975 SHEEI user 11 FIG. 85b F I6. 85

M7 F /6.85a

INVENTOR GEORGI OROSCHAKUFF BY 0w ATTQRNEY PATENTED DEC 1 8 I973 SHEEI UBBF 11 ['1 M l M M 1 M l M INVENTOR.

I GEORGI UROSCHAKOFF ATTORNEY PATENIED um: 18 I975 sum 0s 0F 11 .FIG. 71

INVENTOR. GEORGI OROSULAKOFF BY g j AT IORNEY.

PATENTEDIJEU 18 I975 SHEET IOBF 11 mm, 6mm mm M 0 Q Q O F MW c Q x Q m; Q: mm m a @NGI 'JEORGI OROSCHAKOFF INVENTOR.

8 marl in) ATTORNEY 1 REINFORCEMENT FIELD or THE. INVENTION This invention relates to a reinforcement for reinforced-concrete structures, such as slabs, beams, columns or the like, which reinforcement is characterized in that it consists of at least two separate, standardized two-dimensional or angled reinforcing sections of a modular system having graded lengths and heights, which sections can be assembled to form twodimensional or basket-shaped reinforcements of any dimensions and any steel cross-section.

To enable the provision of any desired reinforcement which may be required for any desired reinforcedconcrete structures, such as beams, columns, slabs, frames, waffIe-type-structure, by a mere assembling and without additional joining operations, such as typing, or another fixation of the reinforcement sections relative to each other, the invention relates to the design of the standardized sections of the modular system and their assembly to provide rigid and self-supporting two-dimensional and basket-shaped reinforcements.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Hence, the reinforcement according to the invention is characterized in that the two-dimensional and/or angled reinforcing sections can be nonpositively interengaged to form self-supporting reinforcements of any desired shape, which are rigid at least in one direction.

In a process of manufacturing such reinforcement, the two reinforcement sections are pushed one into the other at an angle relative to one another until their longitudinal rods engage, whereafter the reinforcement sections are turned into a plane which is common to legs of their transverse rods and and are moved away from one another, if desired.

In this way, any desired rigid reinforcement (rectangular beam or rectangular column, T-beam, I-beam, slab beam of any desired dimension, etc.) section can be obtained merely by assembling the sections of the modular system.

The resulting beam reinforcements have no longitudinal rods in their upper portions so that the slab reinforcement can extend through any beam reinforcement. To enable adaptation to the moment curve as closely as possible, additional reinforcing elements can be provided, which are forced into prefabricated eyes. To facilitate the assembling work, the lower reinforcement can be placed in suitable eyelets before the side sections are assembled, and the upper reinforcement can be placed on infinitely adjustable supports.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING Further features and advantages of the invention will become apparent from illustrative embodiments of the invention with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which FIG. 1 is a side elevation showing an angle section.

FIG. 2 is a side elevation showing a modified angle section.

FIG. 3 is a side elevation showing the assembling of two sections of FIG. 1.

FIG. 4 is a side elevation showing the resulting open basket-shaped reinforcement.

FIG. 5 is a side elevation showing a modification of FIG. I.

FIG. 6 is a side elevation showing the assembling of two sections of FIG. 5.

FIG. 7 is a side elevation showing the resulting basket-shaped reinforcement.

FIG. 7a is a side elevation showing a coupling of plastics material used in the reinforcement of FIG. 6.

FIGS. 8 to 13 are side elevations showing additional embodiments of angle sections.

FIGS. 14 19 are side elevations showing beam reinforcements formed from such sections and having different lengths.

FIGS. 20 and 21 are perspective views showing two different angle sections.

FIGS. 22 and 23 are diagrammatic perspective views showing respectively an angle section and a basketshaped reinforcement consisting of such angle sections.

FIG. 24 is a perspective view showing another coupling of plastics material.

FIG. 25 is a diagrammatic perspective view showing a basket-shaped reinforcement assembled from angle sections.

FIGS. 26 and 27 are side elevations showing two different beam reinforcements assembled from pairs of angle sections.

FIGS. 28 and 29 are sectional views taken on line 28-28 in FIG. 29 and line 29-29 in FIG. 28, respectively, and showing a coupling used in the beam reinforcements of FIGS. 26 and27.

FIGS. 30 to 32 are side elevations showing a pair of angle sections as they are assembled to form baskets of different widths.

FIGS. 33 and 33a are side elevations and end elevations showing a two-dimensional reinforcement.

FIGS. 34 and 34a are similar views showing another embodiment of a beam reinforcement.

FIGS. 35 and 35a and 36 and 36a and 37 and 37a are similar views showing two double-faced sections.

FIGS. 38 and 39 are side elevations showing two modified embodiments of angle sections having a flange bent in U-shape.

FIG. 40 is a perspective view showing the section shown in FIGS. 37 and 37a.

FIGS. 41 to 43 are top plan views illustrating the assembling of angle sections to form a columnreinforcing basket.

FIG. 44 is a diagrammatic top plan view showing a beam grid reinforcement.

FIG. 45 is a side elevation illustrating the formation of the side wall of the beam-reinforcing basket used in the reinforcement of FIG. 44.

FIG. 46 is a sectional view taken on line 4646 of FIG. 44 through the beam reinforcement in the formwork before the missing parts are inserted.

FIG. 47 is a sectional view which is similar to FIG. 46 and shows the finished reinforcement.

FIGS. 48 and 48a are, respectively, a side elevation and a top plan view showing a loop section used in the reinforcement of FIG. 47.

FIG. 49 is a perspective view showing a clamp section used in the reinforcement of FIG. 47.

FIGS. 50 and 50a' are side elevations showing a double-faced reinforcing section.

FIG. 51 shows the resulting reinforcement.

FIGS. 52 55 are side elvations showing angle sections used in the manufacture of a wide basket-shaped reinforcement.

FIGS. 56 59 are similar views showing reinforcing sections used in an I-beam reinforcement.

FIG. 60 is a side elevation showing the finished beam reinforcement.

FIG. 61 is a top plan view showing another twodimensional reinforcing section.

FIG. 62 is a side elevation showing a pair of such sections as they are assembled.

FIG. 63 is a side elevation showing the resulting reinforcement and its steel cross-section.

FIG. 64 shows the same reinforcement having a larger span.

FIG. 65 is a top plan view showing a two-dimensional reinforcement consisting of a pair of sections of FIG. 61.

FIG. 66 is a top plan view of a modification of FIG. 61.

FIG. 67 is a side elvation showing the section of FIG. 66.

FIG. 68 is a side elevation illustrating the assembling of two sections of FIG. 67 to form a two-dimensional reinforcement.

FIG. 69 is a side elevation showing the resulting twodimensional reinforcement together with its steel crosssection.

FIGS. 70 and 700 are top plan views showing the reinforcement of FIG. 69 with two different spans.

FIG. 71 is a top plan view showing a reinforcement for a slab having a crosswise reinforcement and the steel cross-sections in both dimensions.

FIG. 72 is a diagrammatic perspective view showing the design of a reinforcement for a slab field and a beam.

FIGS. 73 and 73a are top plan views showing a twodimensional section for a reinforcement which is rigid in two directions.

FIGS. 74 and 74a are corresponding side elevations.

FIGS. 75 to 77 are side elevations illustrating the assembling of these sections:

FIG. 78 is a side elevation showing a pair of doublefaced sections.

FIGS. 79 to 81 are side elevations showing the assembling of the sections of FIG. 78.

FIGS. 82 -84 are views similar to FIGS. 79 81 showing a modified embodiment.

FIGS. 85 and FIGS. 85a and 85b are, respectively, a top plan view and two side elevations showing an element having a beveled edge portion.

SPECIFIC DESCRIPTION FIGS. 1 and 2 show embodiments of reinforcing angle sections W1 and W2 having a modular system grid line spacing M and a rod diameter 1b. The reinforcements consist of angled transverse rods 1 and longitudinal rods 2, 2b, which support the rods 1 and are joined to them at the crossings, e.g., by welding. The longitudinal rod 2a indicated by dotted lines may be incorporated or omitted. I

If one of two equal angle sections as shown in FIG. 1 is turned through 180 and the two sections are then assembled so that their horizontal flanges interdigitate such a is sh n IG 3 until ihIQ l$lb Qfth t angle sections W and Wla are in mutual engagement, the angle sections can be rotated in the direction of the arrows Pf 1 and Pf 2 until the open basket-shaped reinforcement of FIG. 4 is obtained, which is now rigid in the direction of the arrows Pf 3 and Pf 4.

Angle sections W2 of FIG. 2 may be similarly assembled or an angle section W1 and a section W2 may be assembled together.

The reinforcing section W3 shown in FIG. 5 is similar to that of FIG. 1 with the difference that the rod 20 is disposed above rather than below the rods 1. The two sections are assembled as shown in FIG. 6 in that the protruding rods 1 are caused to interdigitate until both rods 2c engage each other and both sections are then turned in the direction of the arrows Pf 5 and Pf 6. This results in the basket-shaped reinforcement shown in Fig. 7, which is rigid in the direction of the arrows Pf 7 and Pf 8. FIG. 7a shows by way of example an emboidment of coupling KQ, which is made of plastics or the like material and serves also as a spacer.

The combination of the reinforcing angle sections W4, W5, W6 in a modular system is illustrated by way of example in FIGS. 8, 9 and 10. The embodiments shown in FIGS. 8, 9 and 10 differ from those in FIGS. 1 and 2 in that the longitudinal rods are not centered on the modular system grid lines having the spacing M but laterally adjoin said lines. The angle section W5 shown in FIG. 9 has a longer horizontal flange, the increase in length being 0.5 M. At the same time, the requirement L 2L,e must be met, where e is the bond or embedment length of the respective rod.

The length of the horizontal flange of the angle sec- 1 tion shown in FIG. 10 has been increased by a further amount of 0.5 M, and meets the requirement L 2L e= 4L,3e so that all widths can be spanned without gaps.

Equal and different ones of the angle sections shown in FIGS. 8 10 can be assembled to form open basketshaped reinforcements shown in FIGS. I4 19. The open basket obtained by an assembling of equal angle sections W4 of FIG. 8 has widths of 2.0 M to 2.5 M. Intermediate widths can be obtained without difficulty by the use of couplings of plastics material or the like, such as are shown in FIG. 24, as engaging members. The combination of the angle section W4 of FIG. 8 and of the section W5 of FIG. 9 results in reinforcements having widths of 2.5 M to 3.0 M. A combination of equal sections W5 of FIG. 9 results in reinforcements having widths of 2.5 M to 3.0 M. A combination of equal sections W5 of FIG. 9 results in reinfocements having widhts of 3.0 M to 3.5M, etc.

It is apparent that any desired width can be obtained without difficulty. This will only be possible if the dimensions are graded by A L=L-e, where e is the bond length of the steel rod etc.

FIGS. ll, 12 and 13 show another embodiment of the reinforcing angle sections W7, W8 and W9. In this emboidment, one flange, which is vertical in the drawing, has no longitudinal rods.

FIGS. 20 and 21 are persepctive views showing some embodiments of reinforcing angle sections W. In the embodiment of FIG. 21, one flange is of graded length to enable a better adaptation to the moment curve. This grading may be used with each of the reinforcing angle sections which are shown. FIG. 22 is a diagrammatic view showing a reinforcing angle section of one of the embodiments which have been described hereinbefore. FIG. 23 is a diagrammatic view showing a pair of angle sections assembled to form the abovedescribed, open basket-shaped reinforcement.

As has been mentioned hereinbefore, FIG. 24 shows an embodiment of a supporting coupling, which may be made of plastics material, hard rubber or ebonite, or the like. When the eye K1 is forced onto one of the rods 1 to the desired extent, the cross-pieces K2 will provide the desired fulcrums about which the sections to be assembled should be rotated.

To provide a beam or column in the required length, pairs of the reinforcing angle sections are assembled as described in the desired width and are then arranged one behind the other, as has been shown in FIG. 25. If L1 is the length in which the angle sections are manufactured, any desired length L which is needed may be obtained by placing n standard sections and a fitting member having a length Llzm one behind the other. The resulting open basket having a cross-sectional shape such as is shown in FIG. 26 or 27 may be assembled on the site or in the workshop. As is apparent from FIGS. 28 and 29, the load-carrying longitudinal rods 3 and 4 having a continuous length L are connected to the open basket with the aid of the spacers Al and A2, which also constitute connecting couplings and hold the basket together.

FIG. 30 shows the assembling of two angle sections W of the kind shown in FIGS. 11 13. In this case it has been assumed that sections W9 shown in FIG. 13 are used. To assemble the sections, the flanges having no longitudinal rods 1 are interdigitated and that each of the two sections W 9 is moved in the direction of arrows Pf9 and Pf until the flanges 1 of one section engage the longitudinal rods 2 of the other section. The resulting rigid open basket is shown in FIGS. 31 and 32. This basket will not be deformed even when pressure is applied thereto in the direction of the arrows Pf 11 and Pf 12.

High beams and beams in which the longitudinal rods have been included at least in part in the factory are provided with reinforcing ladder sections as side sections of the basket reinforcement. Such a reinforcing ladder is shown in FIGS. 33 and 33a. The crossing rods 5 and 6, 6a are joined at the crossings, e.g., by welding. The carrying rod 7 is also joined to the rods 5.

FIGS. 34 and 34a show a similar reinforcing ladder, in which the rods 5 of FIG. 33 having been replaced by a zigzag rod 8.

FIGS. 35 and 35a show a double-faced reinforcing section D1. The reversely bent, U-shaped rods 10 are also joined to the longitudinal rods 9 at the crossing points.

FIG. 36 shows a modification of the section D1 of FIG.35. In this section D2, the rods 10 are of equal length. Another feature of this embodiment resides in that the longitudinal rods 9 adjoin the double rods 10 only on the outside thereof and extend at right angles to the plane of each double rod 10.

Another embodiment of an angle section D3 comprises longitudinal rods 9 disposed on both sides of the reversely bent double rods 10. This is shown in FIGS. 37 and 37a. FIG. 40 is a perspective view illustrating this embodiment D3. In assembling the elements of the modular system, it will be sufficient if the longitudinal rods of one section support the transverse rods of the other section when the two sections extend one into the other.

FIG. 38 shows a combined assembly Kl comprising a reinforcing angle section W of FIGS. and 21 and one of the double-faced sections D1 D3. The rods 11 are angled and are reversely bent at one end, in the drawing at the right-hand end, of the arm. It will be understood that the arms could be reversely bent at both ends.

FIG. 39 shows a section K2, which is a modification of the section Kl shown in FIG. 38. The reversely bent arm is extended in length and the arrangement of the longitudinal rods 13 and 14 is changed.

In making a column reinforcement, e.g., with the reinforcing sections W3 of FIG. 5, the open-topped basket-shaped reinforcement is shown in FIG. 41. Depending on the desired length of the column, these reinforcements W3.l are assembled in pairs, as has been explained with reference to FIG. 25. The longitudinal rods 19 of the reinforcement are forced into the couplings A3, which are secured to the sections WI.

The sections W8 shown in FIG. 12 withlongitudinal rods 20 secured thereto are then assembled to form reinforcements W8.l and are arranged so that the rod 2b bears on the rod 2 of the reinforcements W3.1. The rotation in the direction of the arrows Pf 13 results in the basket-shaped reinforcement shown in FIG. 43. In this case, different spacers A4 are used, which serve also as connecting couplings. The positions of the transverse rods and longitudinal rods may be changed so that an assembly results which is different but based on the same principle.

The column reinforcements thus assembled are placed as is generally known. When the column reinforcements are in position, a beam reinforcement may have to be provided, e.g., for a beam grid. This example has been chosen to illustrate the assembling of a very complicated reinforcement.

FIG. 44 is a top plan view showing a beam grid. The formwork consists in the usual manner of a platform PI. The dimensions of the beam grid are indicated with dotted lines. The beams Trl have the spacing L1 and the beams Tr2 have the spacing L2.

Pairs of angle sections 2 W as shown in FIG. 5 are assembled first in the desired width and are placed as indicated in FIG. 49. For the sake of simplicity, it is assumed that the beams Tr l and the beams Tr 2 require only four rods 21, 22, 23 and 24 as a field reinforcement, as is indicated in FIG. 45. Couplings A4 serve to hold these rods. The subsequent assembling may be carried out in different ways, depending on preference and requirements.

It may be assumed first that all longitudinal rods are to be placed on the site. When the open-topped basketshaped reinforcement W has been made as described hereinbefore, ladder sections S as shown in FIGS. 33 and 33a are applied as side sections, as is shown in FIG. 45. The side sections used in this case are higher by one modular system grid line spacing than those of FIG. 33 and have no longitudinal rods. The sections S are then turned upwardly in the direction of the arrows Pf l4 and Pf l5 and are thus held in position by the section shown in FIGS. 48 and 48a. This results in the basketshaped reinforcement shown in FIG. 46. The side sections S must be selected so that the rods 6b remain below the lower edge of the slab. Then the slab field reinforcement F1, F2 is assembled by being applied from above in the direction of the arrows Pf 16. A clamp section Af as shown in FIG. 49 and provided with couplings K may then be applied. Now the reinforcing rods 25 may be inserted (FIG. 47). The negative slab reinforcement is then applied in the direction of the arrow Pf 17. This negative slab reinforcement may be designed as shown in FIGS. 30 32 and closes the basketshaped reinforcement of the beam adjacent to the slab. The assembling has now been completed. The final structure is shown in FIG. 47.

The longitudinal rods may also be applied to the side sections of FIG. 33 or 34 in the factory.

The longitudinal rods may be applied in this case in part in the factory and in part on the site. For use under conditions involving torsional stresses or high shear stresses, side sections S may be used which consist of assemblies of sections which are similar to those of FIGS. 35 to 37. The resulting combined sections are shown in FIGS. 50 and 50a. A plurality of such sections are arranged one beside the other and joined to the carrying rod 28 to form the first combined section SI (FIG. 50). The torsion reinforcement 29, 29a is connected by means of couplings or other means. The complementary combined sections S2 shown in FIG. 50a are assembled in the direction of arrow Pf l8 and ultimately result in the closed basket-shaped partial reinforcement T shown in FIG. 51, which reinforcement is displaceable in the direction of arrow Pf 19. It is pointed out that there are no longitudinal rods in the upper portion of the basket-shaped reinforcement. The variation of the beam height within one grid line spacing of the modular system is designated A L in FIG. 5011. e is the bond length. If the torsion reinforcement 29a obstructs the movement of the rod of the side section 52, sections 81 and S2 must be assembled so that section S2 is displaced in the direction of arrow Pf l9 and is then applied to S1 and pushed in the direction of arrow Pf until the desired length has been obtained. The resulting side sections may be applied in the same manner to the lower basket-shaped reinforcement, as is shown in FIG. 45, and turned up in the direction of arrows I4 and 15. The remaining steps are performed as in FIGS. 50, 51 and 52.

FIGS. 52 55 show an embodiment of a load-- carrying reinforcement consisting of four angle sections W9 as shown in FIG. 13. As is apparent from FIG. 52, two such elements are pushed one into the other until their rods 2b engage and are then moved to the position shown in FIG. 53 to form an open basketshaped reinforcement. A second, identical basket is then formed and as shown in FIG. 54 is pushed together with the first basket in an operation which is similar to the one that has been described above, until the rods 2 contact each other. The rods 1 are then turned until their longer arms lie in a common horizontal plane so that the reinforcing basket shown in FIG. 55 results.

As another example, an l-beam reinforcement will be explained with reference to FIGS. 56 59.

As is apparent from FIG. 56, a pair of angle sections as shown in FIG. 39 are assembled as shown in FIG. 56 to form a flange portion as shown in FIG. 57. The lower flange portion is made similarly, as is shown in FIG. 59. The required carrying rods 29 are additionally inserted here. In this example, the web portion consists of double-faced sections shown in FIGS. 37 and 37a. These three reinforcement portions are then pushed vertically one into the other in the direction of arrows Pf 21 and Pf 22 so that the beam reinforcement having the sectional shape shown in FIG. 60 is ultimately otained.

It is clearly apparent from these figures of the drawing and from these examples that other reinforcements having any desired cross-sectional shape can be assembled.

Mesh sections may be made as reinforcing sections for use as field reinforcements in slabs of reinforcedconcrete structures; these reinforcing sections may be assembled in pairs in assemblies which are rigid at least in one direction.

Such mesh section M1 is shown in a top plan view in FIG. 61. It consists of longitudinal rods 31 and 32 of different length and arranged in alternation, and transverse rods 33 which extend at right angles to the longitudinal rods and on the underside thereof but only over about 0.6 of the length L of the longitudinal rods, to which the transverse rods are joined, e.g., by welding. The free ends of the rods 31 and 32 thus have a length of about 0.4 or 0.3 L. M designates again the modular system grid line spacing and e the bond length. e, equals e/2, which is one-half of the bond length. As is apparent, the transverse rods 33 protrude by e, from the outermost longitudinal and the longitudinal rods protrude by e from the transverse rod 33 which is farthest to the left in FIG. 61.

As is apparent from FIG. 62, two sections M 1, M2 as shown in FIG. 61 may be pushed one into the other at an angle until each section engages the transverse rods 33a of the other, and may be subsequently turned in the direction of the arrow Pf 23 to provide the field reinforcement which is shown in FIG. 63 and has the shortest span L1. This reinforcement is rigid in the sense of the arrow Pf24. The section M2 may be pushed in the direction of arrow Pf 25 so that the largest span L2 can be obtained. This increase of the span corresponds to one grid line spacing of the modular system. Within this range, the mesh sections may be displaced relative to each other to provide any desired span between L] and L2, such as is shown in the top plan view of FIG. 65.

The embodiment shown in FIGS. 66 70a differs from that according to FIGS. 61 65 only in that the transverse rods 33 of the mesh section M3 protrude by the bond length e rather than by e, at the upper end in FIG. 66 and that the transverse rods 33 of the mesh section M3 are disposed on the underside rather than on the upper side of the longitudinal rods 31, 32. As is apparent from FIGS. 70 and 71, the two mesh sections thus pushed one into the other have a contour which can be exactly circumscribed by a rectangle, whether the span equals nxM, as is shown in FIG. 70, or nxM+A, as is shown in FIG.70a.

Such two-dimensional reinforcing sections as shown in FIGS. 61 and 65 may be assembled to form crosswise reinforcements for slabs. This is diagrammatically indicated in FIG. 71. For this purpose, it is sufficient to provide two pairs of mesh sections M1, M2 and M3, M4, which have been pushed one into the other, to arrange these pairs one beside the other, and to place two additional mesh sections extending at an angle of to the first-mentioned mesh sections on the latter. In the resulting arrangement, the longitudinal rods of the first pair lie in the lowermost plane, the load-distributing transverse rods of the first pair and the longitudinal rods of the second pair lie in a middle plane, and the load-distributing transverse rods of the second pair lie in the uppermost plane (FIG. 71).

Any desired other reinforcement may also be assembled by means of the modular system according to the invention. FIG. 72 shows another embodiment consisting of a reinforcement for a slab field, an adjoining basket for a beam and a negative column reinforcement. In FIG. 72, reinforcing sections which are rigidly connected are represented white and black in alternation. A double-faced section D as shown in FIG. 50 is indicated on the left and joined to a mesh section M3 of FIG. 65. The latter is joined to a mesh section M4, which is joined to an angle section W of FIG. 3. The latter is joined to a ladder section L of FIG. 33, etc.

In some cases it may be desired to join two adjacent reinforcing sections so that they are rigid in two directions rather than only in one direction.

Where mesh sections M5, M6 of FIGS. 73 and 73 a are used, this requirement can be met in accordance with another feature of the invention in that the two outermost ones, e.g., of the longitudinal rods 31 are provided with a reverse bend 35 in the direction of the required joint and of the adjacent transverse rod or transverse rods 33. As is apparent in FIGS. 74 and 74a, this bend 35 is upwardly directed because the transverse rods 33 are also disposed on top. The assembling operation is basically the same as with the previously described embodiments and is illustrated in FIGS. 75 and 76. In this case, the movement to the position shown in FIG. 76 is continued by a movement in the direction of arrows Pf 26 until those transverse rods 33a which are mutually adjacent have separated to such an extent as to enter the associated reverse bends. This results in a two-dimensional reinforcement which is rigid in two planes.

A similar arrangement may be obtained with doublefaced sections having longitudinal rods formed with U- shaped bends as shown in FIGS. 36 and 36a. As is apparent from FIGS. 78 81 and 82 84, respectively, reverse bends 35 may also be provided in this case, which extend on the inside in the arrangement of FIG. 78 and on the outside in the arrangement of FIG. 82.

For a reinforcement of elements of construction having beveled edge portions, the mesh sections may have a corresponding oblique portion. An example of such mesh section is shown in FIG. 85, where a mesh section M7 is provided with longitudinal rods 36 which have U-shaped reverse bends and constantly increase in length from one end (FIG. 85a) to the opposite end (FIG. 85b).

Numerous further modifications of the embodiments described by way of example are possible within the scope of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. A reinforcement for concrete, comprising a pair of assembled reinforcing sections each including a plurality of longitudinally spaced right-angled transverse rods having corresponding sets of legs lying in respective mutually perpendicular planes, and a respective longitudinal rod extending at least the full length of the reinforcing section and secured to all of the legs of each set to one side of the respective plane, the legs of a set of one of said sections interdigitating with the corresponding legs of a set of the other section so as to be coplanar therewith and having their longitudinal rods to the same side of their common plane, whereby the interdigitated legs are adaptable for disassembly or assembly by relative rotation of said sections about one of the longitudinal rods of the interdigitated sets; and a generally U-shaped clip engaging and straddling a leg of each of the interdigitated sets for retaining the interdigitating legs in coplanarity.

2. The reinforcement defined in claim 1 wherein said assembled sections form an elongated structure of generally U-shaped cross-sections.

3. The reinforcement defined in claim 1 wherein each of said sections has a length equal to the product of an integer and a unit length of modular construction.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3890756 *Jul 16, 1973Jun 24, 1975Wagner EdmundConcrete reinforcement
US5358423 *Nov 24, 1993Oct 25, 1994Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyConnecting clip
US7437858 *Feb 3, 2004Oct 21, 2008Reward Wall System, Inc.Welded wire reinforcement for modular concrete forms
EP1398426A1 *Sep 9, 2003Mar 17, 2004Ezio FerrariA profile in metal or in another material for the formation of trestles for use in making joists
EP2789738A1 *Apr 14, 2014Oct 15, 2014AVI Alpenländische Veredelungs-Industrie Gesellschaft m.b.H.Method for producing a paving and paving thus produced, use of a grating for the fixation of cobblestones and metallic grid
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/646, 52/649.7, 52/662, 52/649.8
International ClassificationE04C5/065, E04C5/04, E04C5/06, E04C5/16, E04C5/01
Cooperative ClassificationE04C5/0627, E04C5/04, E04C5/167, E04C5/0622, E04C5/0609, E04C5/0613, E04C5/065
European ClassificationE04C5/06B, E04C5/06A2, E04C5/16B2A, E04C5/065, E04C5/04, E04C5/06A1, E04C5/06A4