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Publication numberUS3779090 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 18, 1973
Filing dateApr 28, 1972
Priority dateApr 28, 1972
Also published asCA977568A1
Publication numberUS 3779090 A, US 3779090A, US-A-3779090, US3779090 A, US3779090A
InventorsCase R, Ostenberg R
Original AssigneeFranklin Manuf Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Washing machine
US 3779090 A
Abstract
A power drive in a washing machine oscillates an agitator with a positive drive and spins a basket with a limited torque for gradual spin-up. The arrangement includes a transmission for selectively driving either the agitator or the basket as determined by the direction of rotational input. The drive to the transmission includes a one-way clutch adapted to positively drive the transmission in the agitation direction and a slip clutch to drive the basket with a predetermined torque in the opposite spin direction. A rotatable housing of the transmission forms both a sealed enclosure and a rigid structure in which a gear train is mounted. The housing has two mating sections in each of which are mounted spatially independent gear sets connected by a common pivotal link whereby critical gear center to center distances between housing sections are eliminated.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Ostenberg et al.

Primary Examiner-Manuel A. Antonakas Assistant Examiner--Wesley S. Ratliff, Jr.

[ Dec. 18, 1973 Atl0rneyI-larold F. McNenny et al.

57] ABSTRACT A power drive in a washing machine oscillates an agitator with a positive drive and spins a basket with a limited torque for gradual spin-up. The arrangement includes a transmission for selectively driving either the agitator or the basket as determined by the direction of rotational input. The drive to the transmission includes a one-way clutch adapted to positively drive the transmission in the agitation direction and a slip clutch to drive the bakset with a predetermined torque in the opposite spin direction. A rotatable housing of the transmission forms both a sealed enclosure and a rigid structure in which a gear train is mounted. The housing has two mating sections in each of which are mounted spatially independent gear sets connected by a common pivotal link whereby critical gear center to center distances between housing sections are elimi nated.

6 Claims, 3 Drawing Figures WASHING MAtCHINE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The invention relates to improvernents in washing machines and more specifically to an improved mechanical power drive system for selectively spinning and agitating appropriate machine members.

Machines of the type in which the present invention may be readily employed are generally embodied as automatic washing machines in which clothing or other fabric articles are immersed in water and washed under the influence of an oscillatory agitator. Subsequent to the washing operation, a perforate basket in which the articles are held is rotated at high speed to centrifugally extract rinse water from the articles and basket.

Normally in such a machine, a mechanical transmission is provided to reduce the speed of a drive motor and to convert its rotary motion into oscillatory motion for efficient operation of the agitator. Additionally, the transmission usually includes means to rotate the basket at a rate fast enough to cause the rinse water to be centrifugally drawn from the articles.

As a major component of a washing machine, the power transmission system generally accounts for a significant portion of overall machine manufacturing cost. A reduction in the number and manufacturing complexity of various subparts results in economic savings to a manufacturer particularly when such reductions are not reflected by a loss of function or reliability. Further, the transmission system may comprise a substantial portion of the weight of the machine and may thereby significantly affect shipping costs. Reductions in such shipping costs provide savings to the ultimate consumer and result in desirable competitive advantages for the manufacturer.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION According to the invention, a transmission for a washing machine is provided wherein spatial relationships between certain drive train components are ar ranged to minimize dimensional tolerance restrictions in machining and fitting or various areas and parts. More specifically, each meshing gear set in the transmission is independently supported in one or the other of a pair of mating parts forming a separable transmission housing. Consequently, gear center to center distances are associated only with one or the other housing parts or sections and need not be maintained between sections so that machining and fitting procedures are greatly simplified.

In the preferred embodiment, the transmission housing sections separate along a plane perpendicular to rotational axes of the gear sets. The gear sets in a first housing section provide two stages of speed reduction while a sector gear and output pinion set in the other housing section provide oscillating movement for agitation. Shafts for mounting the gear sets are of the stub or cantilever type requiring support only in one housing section so that machining for individual shafts need not be duplicated in each housing section.

A pivotal link is utilized to operably connect the separate drive train sets in each housing so that critical dimensional relationships between opposite housing sections and associated drive train sets are eliminated. Costs normally associated with close machining tolerances between housing sections are thereby minimized. As disclosed, the pivotal link is disposed adjacent the plane of housing separation and the stub shafts do not extend across this separation plane. These features optimize visibility of the various parts during manual assembly and disassembly so that such work is facilitated for further reduction of labor costs.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. I is an elevational view of a washing machine with an outer casing and certain other inner parts in cross section to reveal general details of a power transmission drive system.

FIG. 2 is an elevational cross sectional view of a transmission and other drive system components on an enlarged scale from that illustrated in FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is an exploded perspectiveview of the transmission with portions of its housing broken away to show various details therein.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED, EMBODIMENT Referring now to the drawings, an automatic type washing machine for washing clothes and the like has been selected to embody the principles of the invention. An outer case or cabinet 12 forms the external dimensions of the machine lit) and provides the basic structure on which various other members and components are mounted. Clothes or other fabric articles are loaded into a circular perforated basket I3 through a hinged door (not shown) at the top, designated 14, of the housing 12. A suitable control system (not shown) is provided to initiate various conventional machine functions in a predetermined sequence. These functions chiefly comprise filling a tub T6 with wash water, causing an agitator 17 to be oscillated, draining the tub I6, filling the tub 116 one or more times with rinse water, and finally spinning the basket 13 to centrifugally extract water from the articles therein.

The explanation below is concerned principally with the structure for performing the two mechanical functions of oscillating the agitator I7 and spinning the basket T3. The discussion following explains how these functions are derived through a power drive system 19 in the lower portion of the cabinet I2. The power drive system 19 includes a transmission 21 which has two alternative modes of operation. In a first mode, the transmission ZI operates to oscillate the agitator l7 and in the second mode the transmission spins as a unit to rotate the basket 13.

The power drive system 119 also includes a reversible electric motor or other prime mover 22 with an output shaft 23 adapted to rotate about a vertical axis. A pump 24, driven by the output shaft 23., operates to discharge fluid from the tub In at a proper time in a sequence determined by the control system. The pump 24 is connected to the tub 1.6 by a suitable hose (not shown). Ideally, the motor 22 is adjustably fixed on horizontally extending mounting plate 26 to permit a drive belt 27 to rotatably drive the transmission pulley 28 from the drive pulley 29 on the shaft 23.

Referring now more particularly to FIG. 2, for purposes of understanding the structure and operation of the transmission 2i it is helpful to realize that when the pulley 2% is driven in one direction by the motor 22, rotary motion of a transmission input shaft ill on which the pulley is mounted is converted in the transmission to oscillatory motion in an output shaft 32 which is keyed or otherwise drivingly connected to the agitator 17. Alternatively, when the pulley 28 is driven in the opposite direction, rotation of the input shaft 331 causes rotation of the entire transmission 2i including an upper tube extension 33, keyed or otherwise drivingly connected to the basket l3.

Returning to the discussion of the structural details, as shown in FIG. 2, a lower bearing housing or block 36 having a square or similarly shaped exterior is received in a similarly shaped pocket or recess 37 stamped or otherwise formed in the horizontal mounting plate 26. A layer of elastomeric material 38 such as neoprene provides for resilient mounting of the lower bearing housing 36 in the mounting plate 26. Deformation of the elastomeric material 38 permits selfalignment of the lower bearing block 36 with respect to the various members mounted thereon. Additionally, the elastomeric material 38 absorbs or cushions vibrational forces developed in the lower bearing block 36 and reduces their effect on the remainder of the machine. The outer race of an anti-friction bearing ll is pressed into a counterbore 42 in the lower bearing block 36. The bearing All is axially retained against a radial face 43 of the counterbore 42 by a circular snap ring 44.

The transmission 21 includes separable upper and lower housing sections 46 and 47, respectively, which may be machined from suitably formed metal castings. The lower housing 47 has at its lower end a hub or collar portion 48 which is vertically supported on the inner face of the bearing ll. A lower housing extension tube 51 is tightly received in a cylindrical bore 52 in the hub portion 418 and secured therein by a retaining pin 53 in a cross hole centered on a line tangential to the outer surface of the extension tube. The lower housing extension tube 51 extends downwardly through the inner race of bearing ll with a slight interference fit so that the transmission 23; is thereby journaled in the bearing 41.

The lower bearing housing 36 and lower transmission housing section 57 include coaxial outer cylindrical surfaces 56 and 57 respectively on which an inner diameter of a helical spring 55 seats. The spring 55 operates as a brake in a well known manner by limiting rotation of the transmission housing sections 46 and i7 to one direction relative to the lower bearing housing 36. In the other direction the spring 55 locks the transmission to the non-rotating bearing housing 36. Desirably, the spring brake or clutch 55 is protectively covered by a boot 59 of rubber or the like and a wick 6i saturated with oil.

The upper transmission housing section 46 includes a cylindrical bore 66 in which is securely positioned the upper tube extension 33. Like the lower housing section 47 and extension 51, the extension tube 33 is retained in the cylindrical bore 66 by a cross pin 67. When the housing sections 46 and 47 are properly assembled the axes of their respective bores 66 and 52 are substantially coincident so that, as will be understood, the input shaft 33, the output shaft 32, and the transmission 21 are all capable of rotating about a common axis.

The upper tube extension 33 is journaled in a sleeve bearing H. The sleeve bearing 73 is pressed into a bushing 72 whichis molded in an upper bearing housing 73 formed of rubber or other elastomeric resilient material. The housing 73 is provided with a peripheral groove 74 which operates with an axially extending flange 75 forming an aperture in the tube 36 for mounting of the housing thereon. The resilience of the bearing housing 73 permits the bearing 71 to align itself with the extension 33 journaled therein and tends to absorb vibration in the extension. The housing groove 74 is dimensioned with respect to the flange 75 to form a water tight seal therewith so that water in the tub 16 may not leak past the housing. A dynamic seal, indicated generally at 77, is provided on the upper face of the housing 73 to seal against the outer surface of the extension tube 33 to similarly prevent water from escaping from the tub M.

A plurality of angle straps or legs 81 (FIG. 1) rigidly fix the tub 16 relative to the horizontal mounting plate 26. Accordingly, the transmission 2i is rotatably suspended in the upper and lower bearing housing 73 and 36 along a generally vertical axis. A circular snap ring 78 disposed in a circumferential groove in the extension tube 33 limits upward axial movement of the transmission 2i by abutting a lower face of the sleeve bearing 71.

The upper tube extension 33 extends through a flange 83 which is centered in an aperture 84 in the basket 13 and is secured thereto by suitable fastners (not shown). The flange 83 is locked to the tube extension 33 by a suitable key 86 disposed in a flat 87 formed on the exterior of the tube extension. The basket l3 is thereby rigidly fixed on the extension 33 for rotation therewith.

Turning to a discussion of the structure for driving the transmission Zl, the pulley or disc 28 includes a central axially extending hub M in which a radial sleeve bearing Q2; is retained by a press fit. From the hub 9i, a web 93 extends radially outward to form a circumferentially continuous radial friction face 94. A conical flange 96 joins the web 93 and a peripheral belt receiving groove 97. A short cylindrical collar 98 is fixed to the transmission input shaft 3l by a pin 99. An outer cylindrical surface Hill of the hub 91 has approximately the same diameter as that of the collar 98. A helically wound spring 102 having a slight interference fit with the cylindrical surface MM and the collar 98 forms a one way clutch for transmitting torque between the pulley 28 and collar 93 in a conventional manner. The spring lllZ is adapted to positively drive the shaft 31 when the pulley 28 is driven in a direction corresponding to an agitation mode of the transmission which direction is the same as that in which the spring clutch 55 brakes the transmission 21. The spring W2 is protected from contamination by a rubber boot it)? and oil saturated wick 104.

The pulley 28 is also adapted to drive the transmission input shaft 31 through a slip clutch arrangement lllS that comprises a washer-like pad of friction mate rial W6 suitably secured to an apertured disc or plate 107. The plate lltl7 is biased towards the pulley 28 by a spider type resilient spring ms. The spring W8 is locked to a collar W9 which, in turn, is keyed against relative rotation on the shaft 31 by means of a flat lll formed on the exterior of the shaft 31. Angularly spaced fingers or legs of the spider spring 108 mesh with corresponding slots 1112 in an axially extending flange N3 of the plate W7. A nut lid is threaded onto the end of the shaft 3?; to axially retain the collar m9 thereon. The nut lid may be adjusted axially to vary the friction force between the pulley face 94 and friction material we to define a predetermined slip torque.

The transmission input shaft 31 is journaled in a pair of sleeve bearings 116 and 117 retained in upper and lower ends of the lower housing extension tube 51. A pinion gear 121 is fixed to the upper end of the input shaft 31 by a cross pin 122. A helical spring 123 is positioned on the exterior of an upper portion of the extension tube 51 and a cylindrical hub portion 124 of the pinion 121 having substantially the same diameter as the extension tube. The spring 123 is dimensioned to provide a interference fit between these members 51 and 121 so that the spring forms a one way clutch for transmitting torque between the input shaft 31 and the lower transmission housing 47 only when the input shaft is driven in a direction corresponding to a basket spin mode.

A first stage in reduction of input shaft speed is provided by a gear 126 meshing with the pinion gear 121. A second stage of speed reduction is provided by a second pinion gear 127, integral with the gear 126, and a meshing gear 123. The integral gears 127 and 126 are rotatably mounted on a stub shaft 129 pressed into a vertical bore 131) in the lower transmission housing 47. Similarly, the gear 123is rotatably mounted on a stub shaft 131, as illustrated in FIG. 3, which is suitably pressed into a vertical bore (not shown) provided in a boss 132 on the underside of the lower housing section 47.

A sector gear 136 is pivotally mounted on a stub shaft 137 pressed into a vertical bore 133 in the upper transmission housing 46. The sector gear 136 is retained on the shaft 137 by a C washer 139. A pinion gear 141, fixed to the output shaft 32 by a cross pin 142, meshes with the sector gear 136. A driving connection between the gear 128 and sector gear 136 is provided by a rigid link or connecting rod 146 which transmits forces between these members along a plane perpendicular to the input and output shafts 31 and 32. The link 146 includes integral oppositely extending cylindrical projections 147 and 143 which provide means for connecting the link to the gear members 123 and 136. The projection 147 is pivotally received in a close fitting hole 151 in the output gear 123 in the lower housing 47 while, similarly, the other projection 148 is pivotally received in a close fitting hole (not shown) in the sector gear 136 in the upper housing 46.

The output shaft 32 is journaled in a pair of sleeve bearings 156 and 157 pressed into the upper and lower ends of the upper tube extension 33. At an upper end 158 of the output shaft 32 a nut or other device (not shown) is provided to lock the agitator 17 onto the shaft 32.

As most clearly illustrated in FIG. 3, the housing sections 46 and 47 are separable at a plane perpendicular to the transmission shafts 31 and 32 and along the connecting rod 146 so that the plane of separation extends through the lower cylindrical projection 147. Desirably, the stub shafts 129 and 131 terminate approximately at the plane of separation while the stub shaft 137 terminates adjacent this separation plane.

Bolts (not shown) extend through aligned holes 161 and 162 in the upper and lower housings 46 and 47 to secure these sections together. One or more dowel pins 163 may be pressed into suitable holes in one housing section 47 while cooperating holes are formed in the opposite section 46 to permit the housing sections to be indexed to one another on the plane of separation. A gasket 164 is positioned between the housing section 46 and 47 to eliminate leakage along the plane of sepa ration. A threaded port 165, partially shown in FIG. 3, on the upper housing 46 permits the housing to be filled or emptied of lubricant after a threaded plug (not shown) is removed therefrom.

A principal feature of the transmission 21 is that the gears of each meshing are mounted on the same transmission housing section. In the lower section 47, the gear 126 meshing with the input pinion gear 121 is mounted on the lower section. Similarly, the pinion 127 and meshing gear 128 are mounted in the same housing section 47. In the other housing 46, the meshing gear section 136 and output pinion 1 11 are similarly mounted in the same integral structure. This arrangement makes itrelatively easy to accurately hold all critical center to center distances when machining the respective housing sections for mounting of meshing gears. Connecting the driving elements or gears of the separate transmission sections with the connecting rod 146 eliminates any need for holding mutual gear center to center distances between the housing sections 46 and 47. This elimination of dimensional tolerances of the placement of gears in one section relative to the gears in the other section greatly simplifies machining procedures and thereby results in a transmission 21 relatively economical to produce. Similarly, assembly of the housing sections 46 and 47 relative to one another is not critical so that assembly costs and errors are reduced.

The entire tub assembly, transmission and drive motor are mounted for movement in the case or cabinet 12 by a suspension system which may by way of reference be constructed in a manner similar to that disclosed in US. Pat. NO. 3,493,118 granted Feb. 3, 1970, to B. L. Brucken.

The support legs 31 are welded or otherwise secured to an inverted domed plate 171) having a generally spherical surface 171. Facing this spherical surface 171 is a similarly shaped surface 172 provided by a lower panel 173 of the cabinet 12. The basket 13 and tub 16 and their contents, the agitator 17, transmission 21 and motor 22 along with various other associated parts are vertically supported by an annular shuttle ring 176 disposed between the domed surfaces 171 and 172. The tub 16 is horizontally centered or biased to the position illustrated in the Figures by suitably positioned springs 174 (one is shown) attached to the domed plate and anchored in the cabinet 12. Similarly, the tub 16 is vertically biased by hold down springs 175. As disclosed in US. Pat. No. 3, 493,l l8, the shuttle 176 minimizes transmission of lateral disturbing forces to the cabinet 12 such as produced by a spinning unbalanced load in the basket 13.

From the foregoing structural description, operation of the power drive system, for the most part, is self explanatory. Under the control of an electric control timer and associated switching circuits, for example, the motor 22 is driven in a first or agitating direction. In this first direction, the spring clutch 1112 positively drives the input shaft 31 through the collar 98 thereby causing the gears 1211, 126, 127 and 128 to rotate. teh rotational speed of the final gear 128 is substantially less than the speed at which the input shaft 31 is rotated. in the manner of a crank, rotational movement of the gear 128 is converted to oscillatory motion of the sector gear 136, forces developed in the gear 128 being transmitted by the connecting rod 146 to the sector gear 136.

Oscillation or rocking of the sector gear 136 causes a corresponding oscillation of the output pinion 141 and output shaft 32. The sector gear 136 and output pinion 141 are proportioned to yield an angular oscillation in the output shaft 32 and, ultimately, the agitator 17 of approximately l80 or more. As stated before, the spring clutch 55 operates to brake or prevent rotation of the transmission 21 in the direction that the input shaft 31 rotates to oscillate the agitator 17. Reaction forces set up by the agitator 17 or the gear train of the transmission may cause the basket 13 and transmission 21 to rotate a negligible distance each time the agitator 17 changes direction but such slight movement has an insignificant effect on the performance of the machine 10.

At a proper time in the operation of the machine, the timer control will cause the motor 22 to reverse its direction from that used in the agitation mode and thereby cause the basket 13 to spin. In this case, the spring clutch 102 is incapable of driving the input shaft 31 and torque is transmitted to this shaft through the slip clutch 105. Limitation of the torque applied to the input shaft 31 during start-up in the spin cycle is highly advantageous since limited angular acceleration of the basket 13, initially, permits articles therein to arrange themselves evenly about the circumference of the basket. Further, an unbalanced load developed by poor distribution of the articles in the basket may, without the limited loading of the motor provided by the slip clutch, cause the motor to be overheated. On the other hand, during agitation it is desirable that the agitator be positively driven to eliminate unnecessary wear otherwise caused by intermittent clutch slippage.

When being driven in the spin direction, the input shaft 31 drives the transmission 21 in unison through the spring clutch 123. The spring clutch 55, as mentioned, will permit the transmission 21 to rotate in such direction. Since the whole transmission 21 including the gear 126 rotates with the input shaft and, in particular, with the input pinion 121 there is no oscillatory output from the transmission to the output shaft 32 and hence the agitator l7 merely spins with basket 13 without agitation. From the foregoing description it may be appreciated that the power drive system 19 is relatively simple in construction and operation and results in substantial savings in overall manufacturing costs, bulk and weight while favorably improving machine reliability.

Although a preferred embodiment of the invention is illustrated, it is to be understood that various modifications and rearrangements of parts may be resorted to without departing from the scope of the invention disclosed and claimed herein.

What is claimed is:

l. A transmission in a washing machine for reducing input speed and converting rotary input movement of a motor to oscillatory output movement comprising a rigid sealed housing formed of a plurality of separate mating sections, a set of speed reducing gears independently mounted in one of the sections, a sector gear member independently mounted in another housing section for oscillation therein, means on said other housing section for pivotally mounting said sector gear member about an'axis fixed relative to said other housing section, an output shaft including a pinion supported on said other housing section, said second gear member mating with said output pinion, a rigid link pivotally connected at its ends to a gear of said set in said one section and to said oscillating sector gear member in the other section whereby spatial mounting requirements of said gear set and said oscillating member in their respective housing sections are mutually substantially independent.

2. In a washing machine a transmission for reducing input speed from a motor and converting from rotary input movement to oscillatory output movement for driving an agitator comprising a rigid sealed housing formed from two separate sections, a set of speed reducing gears independently mounted in one of the sections, an input shaft journaled on said one section and operably connected to drive said gears, a sector gear independently pivotally mounted in the other housing section for oscillation therein, means in other housing section for pivotally mounting said sector gear about an axis fixed relative to said other housing section an output shaft parallel with said input shaft and journaled on said other section, the output shaft having a pinion gear fixed thereto in said other section, said pinion gear meshing with said sector gear and being driven thereby, a rigid link pivotally connected at one end to said sector gear and at its other end eccentrically to a gear of said set such that said link provides the driving connection between the gear members in said separate sections whereby tolerances in mounting of the gear members of said one section relative to one another are substantially independent of the tolerances in the mounting of the gear members of said other section relative to one another.

3. A washing machine transmission for reducing input speed from a driving motor and converting from rotary input movement to oscillatory output movement for driving an agitator comprising a rigid sealed housing formed of two mating sections, a set of speed reducing gears in one of the sections, means for rotatably mounting said gears independently in said one section, an input shaft journaled on said one section and operably connected by a pinion to drive said gears, a sector gear in the other housing section, means in said other housing section for independently mounting said sector gear about a fixed axis in said other section for oscillation therein, an output shaft parallel with said input shaft journaled on said other section, the rotational axes of said shafts defining an axial direction, the output shaft having a pinion gear fixed thereto in said other section, said pinion gear meshing with said sector gear and being driven thereby, a rigid link adapted to transmit a driving force along a plane perpendicular to said axial direction from a gear of said set to said sector gear, means pivotally connecting said link at its ends to said gear and said sector gear, said housing sections being separable along a plane parallel to said link force plane and within an axial zone defined by said means pivotally connecting said links at its ends.

4. A washing machine transmission as set forth in claim 3 wherein said means for mounting said gears includes stub shaft means supported in said one section, and said means for pivotally mounting said sector gear includes stub shaft means supported in said other section.

5. A washing machine transmission as set forth in claim 4 wherein said first and second mentioned stub shaft means terminate at or adjacent said plane of separation.

6. A transmission for a washing machine comprising a rigid housing formed of two mating sections, an input shaft journaled on one housing section, a two stage set of speed reducing gears in said one section including an integral gear and pinion, said integral gear and pinion being rotatably mounted on a first stub shaft exclusively supported in said one section, said set including an input pinion fixed on said input shaft and meshing with said integral gear and a second gear meshing with said integral pinion, said section gear being mounted on a second stub shaft exclusively supported in said one section, an output shaft journaled on the other housing section and coaxial with the input shaft, an output pinion fixed on said output shaft in said other section, a sector gear meshing with said output pinion and pivotally mounted on a third stub shaft exclusively supported and fixed in said other section, a rigid link pivotally connected at one end eccentrically to said second gear and at its other end to said sector gear such that said link provides the driving connection between the gear members in said sections whereby the spatial relationships of said first and second stub shafts relative to said input shaft are substantially independent of the spatial relationship of said third stub shaft relative to said output shaft.

Patent No. 3,779,090 Dated December 18, 1973 lnaentofls) Ramon K. Ostenbe'rg and Richard P. Case It is certified that: error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

IN THE ABSTRACT, line 9, after "the" change "hakset" to basket Y column 1, under caption SUMMARY or THE INVENTION, line 42, change "or" to of Golumn l'in 30, change "face" to race Column 3, last line in column, change "operates" to cooperates Column 4, line 16, change "housing" to housings Q Column 4, last line in column, change "define" to determine Column 5, last line in column, change "section" to sections Column 6, line 7, after "meshing" insert set Column 6, line 62, after "rotate" change "teh" to The Column 8, line 1, after "other housing section, said" change 7 "second" to sector a Column 8-, line 20, after "housing section" insert FQRM PO-iOSO (10-69) USCOMM-DC 60376-P09 Q us. GOVERNMEPU PRNTING orrlcc: "sq O--366'334 Patent No. 3 ,779 090 SEAL) Attest:

EDWARD :LFLETcmRJ ttesting Officer U N may) STA'EES m'iiisn'i OFF 5E CERTIFICATE OF CQRREGTEQN Dated December 18, 1973 Inventor(s) Ramon K. Ostenberg and Richard P. Case It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Column 8, line 45, after "independently" insert pivotally Column 9, line 12, change "section" to second oigned and sealed this 23rd day of April 19711,.

c; MARSHALL DANN FORM PO-IOSO (10-69) USCOMM-DC BOB'IG-PGQ a n.5, covcmmur "mums orncp; Ian wan-1;,

Page 2

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2347190 *Dec 2, 1940Apr 25, 1944Nineteen Hundred CorpAutomatic washer
US2826055 *Jul 8, 1952Mar 11, 1958Borg WarnerWashing machine drive mechanism
US3182526 *Dec 26, 1962May 11, 1965Buhr Machine Tool CompanyMotorized machine tool way unit
US3429201 *Sep 8, 1966Feb 25, 1969Fiat SpaGear adjustment for machine tool transmission
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5509284 *Apr 29, 1994Apr 23, 1996Mtd Products Inc.Washing machine transmission
US5522242 *Oct 3, 1994Jun 4, 1996Mtd Products IncWashing machine transmission drive connection
US5718652 *Oct 12, 1994Feb 17, 1998Coronel; Paul KayCoronel effect positively infinitely variable rotary motion transmission
US5732574 *Jun 5, 1996Mar 31, 1998White Consolidated Industries, Inc.Washing machine transmission
US5740701 *Mar 29, 1995Apr 21, 1998Mtd Products Inc.Washing machine transmission drive connection
US7568531 *Mar 16, 2005Aug 4, 2009Omi Kogyo Co., Ltd.Gear transmission device for power tool
Classifications
U.S. Classification74/81, 475/12, 475/324, 475/301, 475/17
International ClassificationD06F37/30, D06F37/40
Cooperative ClassificationD06F37/40
European ClassificationD06F37/40
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Dec 11, 1989ASAssignment
Owner name: AUTOMETRICS CO., A CO. CORP.
Free format text: RELEASED BY SECURED PARTY;ASSIGNOR:CITICORP NORTH AMERICA, INC.;REEL/FRAME:005261/0033
Effective date: 19891201