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Publication numberUS3779570 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 18, 1973
Filing dateNov 3, 1971
Priority dateAug 11, 1971
Also published asDE2225564A1, US3870327
Publication numberUS 3779570 A, US 3779570A, US-A-3779570, US3779570 A, US3779570A
InventorsA Betschart
Original AssigneeA Betschart
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Self-releasing ski-binding
US 3779570 A
Abstract
A self-releasing ski binding, for securing a shoe to a ski, comprises first and second coupling means, said first coupling means being provided centrally along the shoe and said second coupling means being disposed at an opposed position on the ski, said first coupling means being resiliently latched to said second coupling means, said second coupling means including means for manual disengagement from said first coupling means.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Betschart, Jr.

[ Dec. 18, 1973 SELF-RELEASING SKI-BINDING Alois Betschart, Jr., Aegeristrasse 6417, Sattel, Switzerland Filed: Nov. 3, 1971 Appl. No.: 195,136

Inventor:

[30] Foreign Application Priority Data Aug 11, S /it zerland ..l1783/7l US. Cl 280/11.35 R Int. Cl. A63c 9/086 Field of Search 280/1 1.35 R, 11.35 D, 280/11.35 H, 11.35 T, 11.35 K, 11.35 Y, 11.35 G

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 9/1971 Lollman et al. 280/1 1.35 R 9/1971 Smolka et al..... 280/11 35 D 6/1966 Beecher 280/1 1.35 T 3,414,281 12/1968 Salomon... 280/1 1.35 T 3,271,040 9/1966 Spademan 280/1 1.35 T

FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 6/1959 France ..280/11.35D

1,240,519 8/1960 France 280/l1.35 K 742,999 9/1966 Canada.... 5 Y 134,284 7/1929 Switzerland 280/11.35 D

Primary Examiner-Benjamin Hersh Assistant Examiner-David M. Mitchell Attorney-Markva & Smith [57] ABSTRACT A self-releasing ski binding, for securing a shoe to a ski, comprises first and second coupling means, said first coupling means being provided centrally along the shoe and said second coupling means being disv posed at an opposed position on the ski, said first coupling means being resiliently latched to said second coupling means, said second coupling means including means for manual disengagement from said first coupling means.

6 Claims, 7 Drawing Figures PAIENIEnnEc 1a 7975 saw 1 as 3 INVENTOR #4 0 5 3575075 67, J26

' ATTORNEYS PATENTEDUEC 1 8 I975- SHEET 2 UF 3 ATTORNEYS EAIENIEDBEE '18 I975 3.779.570 7 saw 3 0F 3 INVENTOR 0/5 557501922 75 ATTORNEY SELF-RELEASING SKI-BINDING The known ski bindings which are self-releasing in a fall have supporting means engaging at the front and back of the ski shoe and which operate together with the release mechanism. These supporting means which are spacially separated from each other therefore require a correspondingly complicated and relatively expensive release mechanism, which has to operate reliably in the stress of turning as well as in a forward fall and therefore require a separate adjustment according to the individual strain caused by the skier is necessary.

The present invention relates to a self-releasing ski binding which differs from the known bindings of that kind in that coupling means, which are connected to each other elastically and powerfully, are arranged in the centre part of the ski shoe, one portion being fixed to a sole part of the ski shoe and the other oppositely to the ski, whereby for release the coupling means react to certain turning momenta caused by falls during skiing, and furthermore that there is provided an operating member which stands in an operating connection to one of the coupling means and by means of which the coupling can be released at will by hand.

Embodiments of the invention are, shown by way of example in the drawing, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a side view of the self-releasing ski binding, seen from the outer face of the shoe, in a first example of construction;

FIG. 2 is a plan view corresponding to FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a view of the self-releasing ski binding from the back;

FIG. 4 is a view from below of the ski binding, with part shown in section along the line IVIV in FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 shows single discs of the springs put together pair-wise, and seen in axial section and on a larger scale;

FIG. 6 is a view of the ski binding from the back in a second example of construction, and

FIG. 7 is a side view thereof with part in section.

1 is the ski shoe in whose sole part 2 a cylindrical latching member 3 is incorporated in a horizontal transverse position near the middle of its length. The latching member 3 has a hollow cylinder 4 which passes through the sole of the shoe 2 in a transverse throughhole 5. In one end of the hollow cylinder 4 there is inserted a conical pin 6 which is provided with a slightly rounded frustum of a cone 6 which protrudes at one end of the hollow cylinder. The hollow cylinder 4 is tightly connected to the main steel plate 22 of the sole of the sole part 2 by welding or screwing on. 7 is a locking screw, accessible from below, which connects the hollow cylinder with the conical pin 6. The other end of the hollow cylinder 4 has a longitudinally movable conical pin 8 which has on its outer part a slightly rounded frustum of a cone 8' and which, by its inner end and by an axially threaded bolt 23, is connected in a screw-adjustable manner with a piston 8" which can move in the hollow cylinder 4 and has an axial threaded hole 24. The piston 8" is secured against coming out of the hollow cylinder 4 by a flange 9 which narrows the opening of the hollow cylinder, and it also bears against a pressure spring, 10. By a screw adjustment of the conical pin 8 with respect to the piston 8" a fine adjustment of the release momentum of the ski binding is possible. The pressure spring 10 is assembled from the conical ring discs or conical spring washers made of spring steel sheet metal (FIG. 5). The ring discs 10 are joined together in pairs or in bundles l0 i.e. matched according to shape. A comparatively soft springing can be achieved by the ring discs 10' which support themselves in pairs with their concave sides against each other. At the end regions of the pressure spring 10 some ring discs can be assembled in bundles as at the left part at 10" in FIG. 5, whereby a more exact fit of the spring length to the length of the hollow cylinder is possible and simultaneously a harder springing can be achieved. By the partly pair-wise and partly bundled joining of the ring discs 10 a coarse adjustment of the springing to a softer or harder release of the ski binding is possible.

To the latching member 3 there is coupled a fitting 11 in the form of a U-bow which is fixed on the upper part of the ski 13 by means of two screws 12, as shown by FIG. 3. Of the upwards pointing side pieces 14, 15, one forms a latch jaw 14 with a hollow conical holding seat 14 in which the rounded frustum of a cone 8' of the latching member seats. The other side piece 15 of the fitting 11 forms a bearing fork in which a latch jaw 16 is journalled to pivot about an axle pin 17. The latch jaw 16 has a hollow conical holding seat 16 in which the rounded frustum of a cone 6' of the latching member 3 engages. The pivotable latch jaw 16 is adjacent to an eccentric 18 of a tension lever 20 which is pivotable in the bearing fork 15 around a pivot pin 19. In the swung-in position of the tension lever 20 the latch jaw 16 is in a locking position. After the tension lever 20 is swung out, the latch jaw 16 is pivotable into its release position whereby the binding can be opened at will and rapidly.

In abnormal use of the binding through forward or backward falls in the direction of the arrow a or a in FIG. 1, or through twisting of the foot during a fall in the direction of arrows b or b in FIG. 2, or in other directions c, c, d, e, e, there is a disengagement of the latching member 3 from the latch jaws 14, 16 due to the sprung conical pin 8 of the latching member 3 as soon as the twisting momentum exceeds a certain adjustable magnitude.

The sole 2 of the shoe lying against the fitting 11 by its articulation part allows also a securing of the ski shoe position by inserting two spacers 21 and gives it a forward tilted position. By a longitudinal displacement of the spacers 21 the tilting of the release can be adjusted to the front or to the back.

The manufacturing costs of the above described ski binding are low and mounting on to new or old skis can be carried out quickly. Also, the-skis are not weakened by a number of holes for receiving fixing screws in the region of the ski binding. In case the ski binding should not open during falls, the tension lever is, as a rule, always reachable by the hand in order to effect uncoupling or release at will.

In order to avoid the incorporation of the latching member 3 into the bottom part of the ski shoe the above described self-releasing ski binding can also be provided with an auxiliary base plate 25 which serves as a carrier of a conventional non-self-releasing ski binding as well as accepting the latching member 3 of the self-releasing ski binding.

In the constructional example illustrated in FIGS. 6 and 7 a base plate 25 is provided with a known holding member 26 at the back and with a similarly operable holding member 27 at the front. The base plate 25 has a U-shaped cross section whereby the profiled flanges 25' which point downwards are connected to each other by a crosspiece 28 at the back, and by a crosspiece 29 at the front. These crosspieces 28, 29 serve to seat plate 25 onto two spacing pieces 30, 31 arranged on the ski. The use of this base plate 25 with the abovementioned simple ski binding which is arranged thereon, allows the incorporation of the latching member 3 and therewith makes the self-releasing ski binding dependent on the ski shoe 1.

The fitting 11 with the integral latch jaw 14 and the bearing fork 15 with the usual latch jaw 16 and the eccentric tension lever 20 is also in this construction fixed on the ski 13, while the latching member 3 engages through the profile flanges 25 of the fitting 11 in corresponding holes and is connected firmly by welding, hard soldering or screwing onto the fitting 11.

I claim:

1. The combination comprising a ski, a ski boot, and a binding for connecting said boot to said ski, said binding comprising a. a hollow cylindrical member in the sole of said boot, the opposite ends thereof being substantially coterminous with opposite edges of the sole,

b. a piston slidable in said cylindrical member,

c. stop means preventing said piston from sliding out one end of said cylindrical member,

d. a pin having a frusto-conical surface normally extending from said one end of said cylindrical member,

e. means adjustably mounting said pin on said piston such that the axial distance between said frustoconical surface on said pin and said piston may be varied,

f. a plug removably secured in the end of said cylinder member opposite said one end, said plug having a frusto-conical surface extending radially from said opposite end of said cylindrical member,

g. a plurality of conical spring washers arranged within said cylindrical member and extending between said plug and said piston biasing said piston towards said stop means, and

h. fitting means arranged on said ski including a pair of spaced conical recesses therein for receiving said conical surfaces of said pin and plug,

i. whereby the axial distance between said frustoconical surfaces of said pin and plug may be changed by adjusting said pin mounting means and the bias pressure applied to said piston may be changed by removing said plug and rearranging said spring washers relative to each other.

2. The combination of claim 1 wherein said means adjustably mounting said pin on said piston comprise an externally threaded shaft on one of said pin and piston and an internally threaded bore in the other of said pin and piston.

3. The combination as defined in claim 2 wherein at least a portion of said spring washers are arranged in pairs, the concave faces of each pair facing each other, and the convex faces of adjacent washers, one from each pair, facing each other.

4. The combination as defined in claim 3 wherein a further portion of said spring washers are arranged with the convex face of one washer contiguous to the concave face of an adjacent washer whereby the bias pres sure applied to said piston is increased.

5. The combination as defined in claim 4 wherein said fitting means comprises a pair of latching jaws, one of said latching jaws being pivotally mounted, one of said spaced conical recesses being located in each of said latching jaws, and cam means including a lever arranged to abut against said pivoted jaw for selectively retaining said jaw in engaging position.

6. The combination as defined in claim 5 wherein said fitting means comprises a U-shaped member secured to the upper part of said ski, said U-shaped member including said latching jaws.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3258274 *Nov 23, 1964Jun 28, 1966Beecher William BryceSnap-on release ski binding
US3271040 *Apr 29, 1965Sep 6, 1966Richard G SpademanSafety binding
US3414281 *Feb 23, 1966Dec 3, 1968Georges P.J. SalomonVertical holding rear safety device for skis
US3606368 *Jan 13, 1969Sep 20, 1971Smolka & Co Wiener MetallSafety ski binding
US3608919 *Jan 31, 1969Sep 28, 1971Rieker & CoSki boot and ski binding therefor
CA742999A *Sep 20, 1966Smolka & Co Wiener MetallHeel clamp for ski bindings
CH134284A * Title not available
FR1198872A * Title not available
FR1240519A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3900204 *Jun 25, 1973Aug 19, 1975Robert C WeberMono-ski
US3905613 *Mar 14, 1974Sep 16, 1975Calspan CorpSki binding
US3921995 *May 3, 1974Nov 25, 1975Moog IncSki binding
US4177584 *Mar 22, 1978Dec 11, 1979Beyl Jean Joseph AlfredSki boot and binding assembly
US4392666 *Mar 13, 1981Jul 12, 1983Alpine Research, Inc.Integral ski binding
US5544909 *Jan 28, 1994Aug 13, 1996The Burton CorporationStep-in boot binding
US5690351 *Jul 21, 1995Nov 25, 1997Karol; ChrisSnowboard binding system
US5697631 *May 4, 1995Dec 16, 1997F2 International Ges.M.B.H.Snowboard binding
US5755046 *Feb 6, 1997May 26, 1998The Burton CorporationSnowboard boot binding mechanism
US5915721 *Jan 31, 1996Jun 29, 1999The Burton CorporationStep-in boot binding
US6050005 *Nov 25, 1996Apr 18, 2000The Burton CorporationSnowboard boot binding mechanism
US6113127 *May 20, 1996Sep 5, 2000Karol; ChrisSnowboard binding system
US6290250Mar 29, 2001Sep 18, 2001Chris KarolSnowboard binding system
US6302427May 22, 2001Oct 16, 2001Karol Designs, LlcSnowboard boot
US6308980Oct 17, 2000Oct 30, 2001Karol Designs, LlcSnowboard binding system
US6343809May 15, 2000Feb 5, 2002Karol Designs, L.L.C.Snowboard boot
US6394484Jul 3, 1997May 28, 2002The Burton CorporationSnowboard boot and binding
US6742801Feb 23, 2000Jun 1, 2004The Burton CorporationSnowboard boot binding mechanism
US6802524Jul 31, 2001Oct 12, 2004Karol Designs, LlcSnowboard binding system and method of using same
US7073814 *Oct 19, 2004Jul 11, 2006Shimano, Inc.Snowboard binding
US7152871Apr 28, 2004Dec 26, 2006Karol Designs, LlcSnowboard binding system
WO1995020423A1 *Jan 25, 1995Aug 3, 1995Burton CorpStep-in boot binding
WO1997003734A1 *May 20, 1996Feb 6, 1997Chris KarolSnowboard binding system
Classifications
U.S. Classification280/613
International ClassificationA63C9/085, A63C9/086
Cooperative ClassificationA63C9/08535, A63C9/086
European ClassificationA63C9/086, A63C9/085B