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Publication numberUS3780870 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 25, 1973
Filing dateFeb 22, 1972
Priority dateFeb 22, 1972
Publication numberUS 3780870 A, US 3780870A, US-A-3780870, US3780870 A, US3780870A
InventorsW Esmond
Original AssigneeW Esmond
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Artificial body member
US 3780870 A
Abstract
Artificial body member, such as a kidney or lung wherein either impurities are removed from blood or oxygen added thereto. The artificial body member includes a pleated web defining alternating first and second flow paths for blood in a treating fluid with the flow paths being maintained for the flow of fluids therethrough by means of spacers, the spacers being in the form of folded strips of mesh web material, this whole assembly being a core which is disposed within a housing and the housing having manifolds for the distribution of fluids.
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United States Patent [191 Esmond Dec. 25, 1973 ARTIFICIAL BODY MEMBER [76] Inventor: William G. Esmond, 537 Stamford Pnmary Exammerwprank Spear Rd., Baltimore, Md. 21229 Attorney-Charles R. Allen I [22] Filed: FCb. 22, 1972 [57 -ABSTRACT [2]] Appl. No.: 227,845 Artificial body member, such as a kidney or lung wherein either impurities are removed from blood or oxygen added thereto. The artificial body member ini 36 cludes a pleated web defining alternating first and sec- [58] Fieid "2 I321 493 0nd flow paths for blood in a treating fluid with the flow paths being maintained for the flow of fluids therethrough by means of spacers, the spacers being in [56] References cued the form of folded strips of mesh web material, this UNITED STATES PATENTS whole assembly being a core which is disposed within 2 f i j a housing and the housing having manifolds for the ueme, r... 3,396,849 8/l968 Lande et al... 210/321 dlstnbutlon of ulds 3,442,388 5/1969 Pall 210/493 x 6 Claims, 8 Drawing Figures PATENTEuuEczsms I 3.780.870-

SHEET 1.0? 2

ARTIFICIAL BODY MEMBER This invention relates in general to new and useful improvements in transfer devices, and more particularly to a transfer device which is suitable for use as an artificial body member such as a kidney or a lung.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION In the past there have been devised many types of transfer devices for treating human blood and perform ing the functions of an artificial body member, such as a kidney or a lung. While many of these transfer devices have proved satisfactory, experimentation continues in an attempt to develop an artificial body member of the transfer type for treating blood wherein the desired blood flow may be readily maintained and at the same time the necessary transfer is effected, In addition to these characteristics, there has been continuing efforts to develop a transfer device which is of the simplest possible construction and wherein the materials are relatively inexpensive and may be readily assembled in a manner wherein the cost is such that many of the elements of the transfer device may be discarded after a single use or salvaging of components thereof is readily feasible.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In accordance with this invention, it is proposed to provide an artificial body member for treating blood wherein a simple housing is provided with the housing being formed of metal and defining a rigid support for a core with the housing at the same time having suitable manifolds for assuring the desired distribution of fluids through the core. The housing is of a construction which may be readily separated for the removal of the core after usage and it is feasible that the housing could be reclaimed.

The core of the artificial body member is a principal feature of the invention and is in the form ofa very simple yet effective transfer device. The core is defined simply by a continuously reversely folded strip of web material so as to define a pleated arrangement. Inserted within the pleats are cooperating web members formed of a mesh material with the web members assuring the definition of flow passages between adjacent pleats.

The core is one which may be readily assembled and after being assembled, it may be compacted and slipped into the housing after which the ends of the core and housing are sealed and the unit is ready for use.

The core is formed of relatively inexpensive materials and can be discarded in its entirety after use. On the other hand, if there is an absolute demand for the salvaging of any materials of the core, it is possible to remove the web members formed of mesh material and cleanse and sterilize the same for reuse.

The use of the web members formed of mesh material also provides for the elimination of laminar flow and serves to provide for an even distribution of the blood against the surfaces of the pleated web material for effective transfer.

With the above and other objects in view that will hereinafter appear, the nature of the invention will be more clearly understood by reference to the following detailed description, the appended claims and the several views illustrated in the accompanying drawings:

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the artificial body member.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the core with parts broken away and other parts illustrated in exploded form.

FIG. 3 is an enlarged fragmentary plan view showing the details of the mesh web material.

' FIG. 4 is an enlarged transverse sectional view taken along the Iine4-4 of FIG. I and shows the flow path within the artificial body member.

FIG. 5 is an enlarged horizontal sectional view taken along the line 5-5 of FIG. 4 and shows the flow path of one fluid through the artificial body member.

FIG. 6 is a horizontal sectional view taken along the line 6-6 of FIG. 4 and shows the flow path of a second fluid through the artificial body member.

FIG. 7 is an enlarged longitudinal vertical sectional view taken along the line 7-7 of FIG. 5 and shows specifically the flow pattern at one end of the artificial body member. I

FIG. 8 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken along the line 8-8 of FIG. 6 and shows further the relationship of the various components of the core and the flow paths through the core.

Referring now to the drawings in detail, it will be seen that there is illustrated in FIG. 1 a transfer device or artificial body member formed in accordance with this invention, the artificial body member being identified by the numeral 10. The artificial body member 10 includes a housing, generally identified by the numeral 11, and a core, generally identified by the numeral 12.

Reference is first made to the construction of the core 12 in that this is a primary feature of the invention. The core 12 is formed ofa single length of flat web material which is folded back and forth upon itself to define pleats as is shown in FIG. 2. Alternating pleats open in opposite directions and define alternating flow paths longitudinally through the core.

A first flow path through the pleated web 13 is assured by the positioning of folded web members id in the opposite ends of each flow path. The web members 14 are identical and each is of a double thickness of mesh web material folded upon itself from a single strip. Each web member 14 opens outwardly in the same direction as the associated pleat. The positioning of the web members 14 at opposite ends of the associate flow path assures the inflow and exit of a first fluid.

The second flow paths through the core 12 are as sured by positioning within the other pleats of the core 12 folded web members 15 and 116, there being a pair of the folded web members 15,16 in each pleat. Each of the web members 15,16 is formed of a single length of mesh web material folded upon itself. The web member 15 extends the full length of the associated pleat, with the ends thereof being generally aligned with the remote ends of the web members M.

Each web member 16 is telescoped over a central portion of its associated web member 15 and cooperates therewith. The length of the web member 16 is less than the spacing between the web members 14 as is clearly shown in FIGS. 5 and 6. This arrangement provides for the definition of flow channels within the core 12.

It is to be noted at this time that the two web members l5 and 16 open outwardly in the same direction as the associated pleat.

Referring now to FIG. 3 in particular, it will be seen that a preferred embodiment of the mesh web material is one which is of a relatively open mesh defined by a plurality of spaced strands 16 disposed in bonded together crossing relation. The mesh web material is a material which may be readily purchased on the open market and must be one which is compatible to human blood. Many silicon products have proven to be successful, although the invention is not so limited.

After the core has been assembled, which may be readily accomplished either by hand or a suitable machine developed for the same, it is positioned within the housing 11. As is best illustrated in FIG. 4, the housing 11 is of a split construction and includes a pair of C- shaped cross sectional members 17 and 18. The core 12 is slid into the open end of the inner housing member 17 and thereafter the outer housing member 18 is telescoped over the inner housing member 17 to the position illustrated in FIG. 4. The relationship between the housing members 17 and 18 may be such that when the housing members 17 and 18 are assembled,'an automatic seal is provided between the two]. On the other hand, a suitable releaseable bonding agent may be utilized to bond the two together in their telescoped relation and to seal the same against any leakage through the joint therebetween.

After the core 12 has been inserted within the housing 11, the artificial body member is completed by closing the ends of the core 12 and sealing the same relative to the housing 11 through the insertion of a suitable sealing compound, such as epoxy, in the ends of the core and the ends of the housing, as is shown in FIGS. 1, 5, 6 and 7. This sealing material is generally identified by the numeral 20. It is to be noted that the sealing material 20 not only seals the pleated webs at the ends of the pleats, but also seals the web members 14 and at their remote ends.

The housing member 18 is ofa configuration wherein it is provided at the opposite ends thereof with manifolds 21 and 22 for a first fluid. In the illustrated flow arrangement, the manifold 22 defines an infeed manifold and is provided with an inlet fitting 23. In a like manner, the manifold 21 defines an exit manifold and is provided with an outlet fitting 24. 7

Referring now to FIG. 5, it will be seen that the manifolds 21 and 22 are aligned with the positions of the web members 14 and extend axially inwardly therefrom so that flow paths into and out of the first webs are clearly defined. It is preferred that the fluid flowing through the flow path illustrated in FIG. 5 be the fluid under higher pressure. Normally this will be the blood.

The housing section 17 is also of a configuration so as to define at its opposite ends manifolds 25 and 26 with the manifold 25 being an infeed manifold and it being provided with an inlet fitting 27. The manifold 26 is an outflow manifold and is provided with an exit fitting 28. The manifolds 25 and 26 assure the flow of a second fluid.

With reference to FIG. 6, it will be seen that the manifolds 25 and 26 are of like, but reverse configurations to the manifolds 21 and 22, respectively, and are aligned with the spaces between the ends of the web members 16 and the web members 15. Thus, flow into the flow paths defined by the web members 15, 16, as well as flow therefrom is assured. Normally the lower pressure fluid, such as the treating fluid, will flow through the second flow paths. At the same time, the

mesh web material will prevent laminar flow of the fluid through the core and will assure equal contact of the fluid with the surfaces of the pleats of the web material defining the second flow paths for an effective transfer.

It will be readily apparent that the construction of the core 12 is such that the desired flow therebetween may be effected. It will also be apparent from FIGS. 5 and 6 that flow in the first and second flow paths through the core is in opposite directions so as to assure an even transfer. It is to be appreciated that the web material 13, which is a principal element of the core 12, must be formed of a suitable material which will permit the desired transfer between the blood and the treating fluid, either the inflow of oxygen into blood in the case of the use of the artificial body member as an artificial lung, or the outflow of impurities from the blood into water or other treating fluid in the case of the use of the artificial body member as an artificial kidney. Since the specific material utilized as the web material 13 in of itself plays no part in this invention and since new materials are being constantly developed, no attempt will be made here to limit the web material 13 to any specific material.

It will be readily apparent from the foregoing description of the construction of the artificial body member 10 that after usage thereof, the two halves l7.and 18 of the housing 1 1 may be readily separated, after which the core 12 may be removed therefrom as a unit. The cost of the core 12 is such that the entire core may be readily discarded and the housing members may be easily cleansed and sterilized for future use. On the other hand, if cost is a true factor, it is feasible to reuse the web members 14,15 and 16, although the cost of these web members normally will be so low so as to eliminate any true need for the salvaging of the same.

Although only a preferred embodiment of the invention has been specifically illustrated and described herein, it is to be understood that minor modifications may be made in the artificial body member without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention, as defined by the appended claims.

I claim:

1. An artificial body member including a fluid transfer core and means for controlling flow into and from said core, said core comprising a pleated web defining alternating first and second flow paths for blood and a treating fluid, and spacer means positioned within said flow paths for maintaining a spaced relation between adjacent pleats of said web, said spacer means including a mesh web material through which fluids may freely flow, said mesh web material being reversely folded upon itself and being of a double ply construction with the plies having a tendency to open, said mesh web material including individual first web members disposed in opposite end portions only of said first flow paths and second web members disposed in central portions only of said second flow paths, said first flow path being free of obstructions in alignment with said second web members, and said second web members being of a length less than the spacing between said first web members thereby forming fluid inlet and discharge areas adjacent opposite ends of said core for said flow paths.

2. The artificial body member of claim 1 wherein a third web member is disposed within each of said second flow paths, said third web members having remote housing member receiving said core and the other housing being telescoped over said one housing member and sealed relative thereto.

5. The artificial body member of claim 4 wherein sealing means seal opposite ends of said core and said housing.

6. The artificial body member of claim 1 wherein said web members open in the same direction as the respective ones of said pleats.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3370710 *May 11, 1966Feb 27, 1968Research CorpCompact blood dialyzer with a pleated membrane therein
US3396849 *May 10, 1966Aug 13, 1968Univ MinnesotaMembrane oxygenator-dialyzer
US3442388 *Mar 27, 1967May 6, 1969Pall CorpArtificial kidney having a corrugated,convoluted membrane
US3612281 *Jan 26, 1970Oct 12, 1971Baxter Laboratories IncParallel membranous layer type fluid diffusion cell
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3864265 *Jun 25, 1973Feb 4, 1975Galen Lab IncEdge sealed folded membrane
US3948777 *Sep 16, 1974Apr 6, 1976Yuasa Battery Company LimitedSolution separating and recovering equipment
US3979295 *Apr 9, 1975Sep 7, 1976The United States Of America As Represented By The United States Energy Research And Development AdministrationFolded membrane dialyzer with mechanically sealed edges
US4163721 *May 15, 1978Aug 7, 1979Cobe Laboratories, Inc.Edge sealed pleated membrane
US4199457 *Nov 5, 1975Apr 22, 1980Esmond William GPleated artificial kidney
US4213858 *Nov 17, 1978Jul 22, 1980Gambro AbSupporting net
US4244820 *May 16, 1978Jan 13, 1981Gelman Instrument CompanyFluid purification system
US4431539 *Feb 5, 1979Feb 14, 1984American Hospital Supply Corp.Semipermeable membrane mass transfer apparatus and method for making same
US4556489 *Mar 9, 1983Dec 3, 1985Shiley IncorporatedMembrane oxygenator
US4617119 *Apr 21, 1980Oct 14, 1986Eduard FreseniusBlood exchange apparatus
US4663125 *May 17, 1985May 5, 1987Cobe Laboratories, Inc.Membrane medical device
US4786411 *Aug 30, 1985Nov 22, 1988Hospal IndustrieFluid treatment apparatus with semi-permeable membranes
DE2714754A1 *Apr 1, 1977Nov 3, 1977Medical IncHaemodialysator
EP0036926A1 *Jan 30, 1981Oct 7, 1981Gambro Lundia ABA device for the diffusion of substances between two fluids via semipermeable membranes
EP0086503A2 *Jan 30, 1981Aug 24, 1983Gambro Lundia ABA device for the diffusion of substances between two fluids via semipermeable membranes
Classifications
U.S. Classification210/321.77
International ClassificationB01D63/14, A61M1/16, A61M1/22
Cooperative ClassificationB01D63/14, B01D61/28, B01D2313/14
European ClassificationB01D61/28, B01D63/14