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Publication numberUS3781164 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 25, 1973
Filing dateSep 25, 1972
Priority dateSep 25, 1972
Also published asCA981043A, CA981043A1
Publication numberUS 3781164 A, US 3781164A, US-A-3781164, US3781164 A, US3781164A
InventorsMccaffery D
Original AssigneeMccaffery D
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Anti-spill container
US 3781164 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

O United States Patent 1 91 [111 3,781,164

McCaffery 1 Dec. 25, 1973 [5 ANTI-SPILL CONTAINER 3,285,694 11/1966 Marchi 431 291 [76] Inventor: Dennis McCaffery, 551 Silver Lake Rd, N B i ht Mi 5 51 12 Primary Examiner-Carroll B. Dority, Jr. F d p 25 1972 Att0mey-Ralph F. Merchant et al.

[21] Appl. No.: 291,963 [57] ABSTRACT I An anti-spill container for candles of the type wholly [52] US. Cl. 431/291, 220/74 contained within the container is Shown including a [51] Int. Cl. F23d 3/16 tubular body having a closed end and an open end. An [58] Field of Search 431/291, 220/74,

220 H 68 inwardly dlrected tubular flange extends from the open end in a direction axially into the tubular con- References Cited tainer to define an annular recess which opens toward the closed end of the tubular body for collection of UNITED STATES PATENTS melted material from a lighted candle when the con- 2,l52,285 3/l939 Schirmer 220/1 H tainer is turned on its side. 2,797,136 6/1957 Nelson 220/1 H 2,461,549 2/1949 Jacobs 220/74 4 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures PATENTEBDECZS I975 PRIOR HRT ANTI-SPILL CONTAINER DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring with greater particularity to the drawings This invention relates generally to containers for can- 5 and in i lly to FIGS- here S Shwn an an i-spill dies and more particularly relates to a container which is adapted to prevent the spilling of liquid material produced by a lighted candle when the container is turned generally upon its side.

2. Description of the Prior Art Present day commercial establishments such as restaurants and nightclubs often utilize candles to bring about a desired lighting atmosphere. Such candles, in the interest of safety, are normally of the type which are wholly contained within a tubular container having a closed bottom and an open top. When lighted, such candles form a pool of melted liquid on the upper surface thereof adjacent the wick which may be spilled from the open top of the container when the container is either purposely or accidentally tipped on its side. As an example of the former, a person may tip the container if he attempts to light a cigarette or cigar. Such spillage often results in injury to the person or damage to the persons clothes or to adjacent furnishings.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention includes a tubular body having a closed end and an open end. An inwardly directed annular flange extends from the open end in a direction axially into the tubular body and cooperates with the tubular body to define a recess within the tubular body which opens toward the closed end thereof. The inwardly directed flange has a free edge which terminates in closely spaced relation to an adjacent end ofa candle received within the tubular body so as to permit passage ofliquid, produced when the candle is lighted, into the recess defined by the tubular body and flange when the container is turned on its side to preclude spillage of the liquid from the open end thereof.

It is a primary object of the present invention to provide an anti-spill container for candles which positively obviates the problem of accidental liquid spillage from the open end thereof. It is a further object of the present invention to provide a device of the class abovedescribed which is relatively inexpensive to produce and can be formed in various shapes, sizes and colors so as to present a pleasing appearance. These and other advantages of the present invention will become apparent from the following description of the preferred embodiments.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a view in perspective in an anti-spill container for candles constructed in accordance with my invention;

FIG. 2 is a view in axial section as seen generally from the line 2-2 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a view similar to FIG. 2 illustrating a different position of the candle holder and the operation of my invention;

FIG. 4 is a view similar to FIG. 2 showing a different embodiment of the present invention; and

FIG. 5 is a view similar to FIG. 3 showing a prior art candle holder and the problems associated therewith.

container for candles which is indicated generally by the numeral 10. As shown, container 10 is preferably constructed from a transparent material such as glass. However, it will be appreciated by those skilled in the art that such candle holders are often constructed in various shapes and sizes and additionally may be opaque, or may have various color combinations or patterns. It will be understood that the present invention is equally applicable to candle holders of the type hereinafter described regardless of the shape and size thereof.

With this in mind, the container 10 illustrated in FIGS. 1-3 is shown as including a tubular body portion 11 having a closed end 12 and an open end 13. A candle 14 is positioned within the tubular body 11 and extends from the closed end 12 toward the open end 13. Candle 14 is of the type fully contained within the container 10 and therefore is shown as terminating in an upper surface 15 which is spaced from the open end 13. The structure heretofore described also generally describes the prior art structure of FIG. 5, indicated generally by the numeral 20. As previously discussed and clearly shown in FIG. 5 of the drawings, such prior art devices 20 have the particular problem of spillage of melted material produced by a lighted candle within the container 20 when such container is either purposely or accidentially turned on its side.

To alleviate this problem and the resultant damages caused thereby, I provide an inwardly directed annular flange indicated generally by the numeral 25. As best shown in FIGS. 2 and 3 of the drawings, flange 25 is tubular or cylindrical in form, projects in a direction axially into the tubular body 11 and is generally concentric or coaxial with respect to the tubular body 11. This construction of the flange 25 provides a free edge 26 which terminates in a closely spaced relationship to the adjacent surface 15 of the candle 14. As shown, the flange 25 cooperates with the tubular body 11 to define a recess which is in the form of a continuous annular channel 27. As seen particularly in FIG. 3 of the drawings, the spacing of the tubular flange 25 with respect to the surface 15, together with the formation of the annular channel 27, provides a convenient receptacle for the reception of melted material 28 produced by the candle 14 within the container 10 when it is lighted. Thus, a candle holder constructed in accordance with the above description completely obviates the problems resulting from use of the type of candle holder illustrated in FIG. 5 of the drawings.

FIG. 4 illustrates a candle holder modified in size and shape but constructed in accordance with applicant's invention. Inasmuch as the candle holder of FIG. 4 is generally similar to that of FIGS. 1-3 like parts thereof will carry like numerals with a prime mark added. The anti-spill container 10' of FIG. 4 differs from the other embodiment only in that it has an elongated tubular or cylindrical body 11' having a constant diameter from the closed end 12' to the open end 13. The structure of FIG. 4 is shown to illustrate a type of container 10' which is particularly susceptible to being accidentally tipped over and also to illustrate the adaptability of applicants invention to containers having different shapes.

The flanges 25, 25' may take various shapes other than that shown. The only restriction is that such shape must provide a recess 27 within the tubular body 11, 11 adjacent the open end 13, 13 thereof for the reception of melted material 28.

While applicant has shown and described specific embodiments of this invention, further modifications and improvements will occur to those skilled in the art. Applicant desires it to be understood, therefore, that this invention is not limited to the particular forms shown and intends in the appended claims to cover all modifications which do not depart from the spirit and scope of this invention.

I claim:

1. An anti-spill container for candles comprising:

a. a tubular body having a closed end and an open end;

b. a candle within said tubular body extending from said closed end toward said open end, said candle terminating within said tubular body in spaced relation to said open end, and;

c. a flange attached to the open end of said tubular body and extending from said open end toward said closed end;

d. said flange cooperating with said tubular body to define a recess within and extending about the inner periphery of said tubular body and which opens toward said closed end.

2. The structure of claim 1 in which said flange is tubular, projects in a direction axially into said tubular body and is generally concentric with respect to said tubular body.

3. The structure of claim 2 in which said flange has a free edge which is spaced from the adjacent end of said candle.

4. The structure of claim 2 in which said recess is a continuous annular channel.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4759104 *Aug 22, 1986Jul 26, 1988Buerosse William BBody case
US4759105 *Aug 22, 1986Jul 26, 1988Buerosse William BBody case with viewing window
US4840597 *Jun 17, 1987Jun 20, 1989Jesmar S.A.Doll with means for producing soap bubbles and having an anti-spill container
US4957464 *Mar 31, 1989Sep 18, 1990Jesmar S. A.Doll with means for producing soap bubbles
US5758797 *Jun 25, 1996Jun 2, 1998Martindale; Jack E.Spill resistant powder container
US6032824 *Nov 2, 1998Mar 7, 2000Barrow; Mark E.Spill-less wave bowl
US6315433Apr 21, 1999Nov 13, 2001Christopher CavelloIce lighting fixture
US6530815May 22, 2000Mar 11, 2003Oddzon, Inc.Bubble tumbler
US6592363Aug 24, 2001Jul 15, 2003Ross W. HoffmannChafing dish fuel canister
US6717789Dec 5, 2001Apr 6, 2004Honeywell International Inc.Power supply rejection circuit for capacitively-stored reference voltages
US8272529Aug 3, 2010Sep 25, 2012Hurricane Shooters, LlcPlural chamber drinking cup
US9022250 *Sep 20, 2013May 5, 2015E. & J. Gallo WineryTilted sensory aroma glass
US20040011695 *Jun 24, 2003Jan 22, 2004Wright James H.Anti-Splash, Anti-Spill Apparatus and Method for Holding Antiseptic Solution During a Surgical Procedure
US20060207993 *Mar 21, 2005Sep 21, 2006Copeland Bruce WCereal bowl
US20070228054 *Aug 3, 2006Oct 4, 2007Peter Joseph WoodhouseSpillage containment
US20100294774 *Aug 3, 2010Nov 25, 2010Mansfield Bryan DPlural Chamber Drinking Cup
US20130062359 *Mar 14, 2013E. & J. Gallo WinerySensory aroma glass
US20140021211 *Sep 20, 2013Jan 23, 2014E. & J. Gallo WineryTilted sensory aroma glass
USD739615 *Jun 1, 2015Sep 22, 2015Michael Kevin RobertsonPest free pet feeder
USD742561 *May 1, 2014Nov 3, 2015Adam KashaVotive candle vase
USD742562 *May 1, 2014Nov 3, 2015Adam KashaTealight vase
USD742563 *May 1, 2014Nov 3, 2015Adam KashaPillar candle vase
USD746108 *Aug 14, 2014Dec 29, 2015Bormioli Luigi S.P.A.Glass
EP1789100A1 *Sep 2, 2005May 30, 2007Givaudan SAVolatile material dispensing apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification431/291, 220/719, 220/659
International ClassificationF21V35/00
Cooperative ClassificationF21V35/00
European ClassificationF21V35/00