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Publication numberUS3781202 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 25, 1973
Filing dateJan 28, 1972
Priority dateJan 28, 1972
Publication numberUS 3781202 A, US 3781202A, US-A-3781202, US3781202 A, US3781202A
InventorsDardoufas K Constantine, R Marshall
Original AssigneeAllied Chem
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Spin finish for polyamide yarn processed at high temperature
US 3781202 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 3,781,202 SPIN FINISH FOR POLYAMIDE YARN PROCESSED AT HIGH TEMPERATURE Robert Moore Marshall, Chesterfield County, and Kimon Constantine Dardoufas, Richmond, Va., assignors to Allied Chemical Corporation, New York, N.Y. No Drawing. Filed Jan. 28, 1972, Ser. No. 221,828 Int. Cl. D06m 13/30 US. Cl. 2528.7 4 Claims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A spin finish composition for nylon feeder yarn to be processed at high temperature into carpet yarn, such as by steam jet texturing, comprising coconut oil, sulfonated natural petroleum product and other essential components results in improved processing and better quality yarn.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to a yarn finish. More specifically, this invention relates to a spin finish for polyamide feeder yarn to be processed at high temperature into carpet yarn such as by steam jet texturing.

Various finishes for synthetic filaments are disclosed in the prior art for high temperature processing. However, none of the prior art teach a specific combination of ingredients to achieve the specific beneficial results of the composition of this invention. The critical amounts and ingredients are shown in the discussion below. Many of the prior art finishes flash olf in high temperature processing such as steam jet texturing for yarn. Others fail to have emulsion stability or have insufficient yarn lubrication.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION For treating polyamide feeder yarn to be processed at high temperature, such as in steam jet texturizing processes, the spin finish composition shown below improves processing and gives better quality yarn. This finish composition has a unique combination of coconut oil and sulfonated petroleum product which provides an unusually even distribution of finish on the fiber in the yarn. In this way, more consistent frictional and physical properties of the yarn results. The unique spin finish of this invention is for high temperature carpet yarn processing, and is specifically designed for steam jet texturing processes. A level of 0.5 to 1.2 percent weight of oil on textured yarn can be achieved even though the finish is applied prior to steam jet texturizing, i.e. when the yarn is spun. The composition has excellent stability to high temperature process conditions, provides lubrication, static protection and plasticity to the yarn for subsequent drawing and steam jet texturing or other high temperature processing. The yarn has more consistent physical and frictional properties from package to package and within the same package. Following is a list of the benefits of the composition of this invention.

(1) It is nonfuming, that is, it does not flash olf in high temperature processing such as steam jet texturing.

(2) It has excellent emulsion stability.

(3) This spin finish lubricates the yarn even after passing through high temperature processing such as steam jet.

(4) The finish improves texturing performance.

(5) An even distribution of the finish is achieved.

(6) The finish prevents static buildup.

(7) Plasticity is imparted to the yarn.

(8) Tuftability of the carpet yarn is improved.

"ice

This invention is a finish of an oil in water emulsion of about 10 to 20 percent by weight of the oil portion. The oil portion is made up of from about 55 to 65 percent by weight of coconut oil, about 3 to 8 percent of polyoxyethylene castor oil, about 5 to 10 percent by weight of decaglycerol tetraoleate, about 2 to 5 percent of glycerol monooleate, about 2 to 7 percent by weight of polyoxyethylene sorbitan monooleate, about 9 to 11 percent by weight of polyoxyethylene tallow glyceride, and about 8 to 12 percent by weight of sulfonated petroleum prod-. uct. Preferably, the coconut oil is refined coconut glyceride, the ethoxylated castor oil contains about 25 moles of ethylene oxide per mole of castor oil, the ethoxylated sorbitan monooleate contains about 20 moles of ethylene oxide per mole of sorbitan monooleate, the ethoxylated tallow glyceride contains about 15 moles of ethylene oxide per mole of tallow glyceride and the sulfonated petroleum product is sodium petroleum sulfonate present as about 60 to 62 percent by weight atcive ingredient in mineral oil. More preferably, the sodium petroleum sulfonate is based on an alkyl-aryl petroleum sulfonate having a typical formula (C 'H )SO Na where n is between about 20 and about 30. Even more preferably, the average molecular weight of the above chemical formula is about 430 and 30 percent of the petroleum product remains unsulfonated mineral oil.

Since, as shown in the data in the preferred embodiments, very little of this finish flashes off in high temperature processing, about 0.5 to 1.2% by weight of yarn, of oil is applied as spin finish, and about 0.5 to 1.2%, by weight, of the oil remains on the yarn after high temperature processing.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Table I shows the finish composition of the preferred embodiment of this invention. Table II shows the criticality of the ingredients and the amounts of ingredients necessary in order to provide a stable emulsion. Note that only the finish identified as A provides excellent emulsion stability after 48 hours. Varying the amounts or leaving out various components results in only fair or poor emulsion stability.

Table III shows criticality of the amounts and the presence of various components in the processing of yarn. Note that only the composition labeled A has excellent texturing performance, tuftability, loses only 0.01 percent of the finish after steam jet texturing, and has by far the lowest yarn to metal friction reading.

Formula of sulfonated petroleum product Alkyl-aryl petroleum sulfonate typical formula n 2n1o) 3 5 r z 20, 30 with 30% mineral oil content average molecular weight 430; sulfonate (S0 Na) 62% by weight.

TABLE II.FINISH COMPOSITIONS Finish components Finish identities A B C D E F G H I J Refined coconut glyceride- 59. 59. 0 59. 0 60. 0 59. 0 60. 0 60. 0 60. 0 58. 0 59. 0 Lubricant. Ethoxylated castor oil (25150)- 5. 3. 0 6.0 5. 5 8.0 13. O 16.0 5. 0 Emulsifier. Decaglycerol tetraoleate- 7. 5 9. 0 7. 0 6. 0 7. 5 8. 0 6. O 9. 0 4. 0 4. 0 Do. Glycerol monooleate 3. 0 3. 0 4. 0 3. 0 7. 0 5. 0 5. 0 10. 0 5 0 Do. Ethoxylated sorbitan mo le 5. 0 7. 0 6. 0 5. 0 7. 0 6. 0 0. 0 4. Do. Ethoxylated tallow glyceride (EO) 10. 0 7. 0 13. 0 10. 0 10. 0 Do. Sodium petroleum sulfonate 60-62% active in mineral oil. 10. 0 12. 0 11. 0 Antistat emulsifier. Sulfated glycerol trloleate 0 Do. Ethoxylated tallow amine (20150). 0 Do. Emulsion stability after 45 hours E P P F F F F P F P See footnote at end of Table I.

E =ExcelentTrans1ucent bluish-white particle size less than 1 micron. No separation. F=Fair-Milky white, particle size up to 4 microns. Slight ring of oil separation on surface. P=PoorChalky white, particle size above 4 microns. Creaming on surface.

TABLE IIL-FINISH AND FIBER PROCESS DATA Finish components A K L M N 0 Finish identities:

Mineral oil (viscosity 50 SUS) 50.0 50. 0 Lubricant. Butyl stearate- 50. O 50. 0 Do. Hexadccyl stearate 50. 0 Do. Refined coconut glyceride- 59. 0 Do. Sorbitan mononlpate 25. 0 25.0 5.0 Do. Oleic sodium soap- 0 17. 0 8. 0 Antistat-emulslfier. Ethoxylated lauric acid (15E0) 1 8.0 15. 0 Emulsifier.

Ethoxylated oleyl ether (IOEO) e 7.0 7.0 Do.

Ethoxylated castor oil (25120) a 5. 5 Do. Decaglycerol tetraoleate- 7. 5 Do. Glycerol mono0leate 3- 0 Do. Ethoxylated sorbltan monooleate (ZOEO) 5. 0 Do Ethoxylated tallow glyceride (15E0) 10.0 Do. sodium petroleum sulfonate 60-62'7 active on mineral oil 10. 0 Antistat-emulsifiet. Sullated glycerol trioleate 18 0 15 0 Do. Ethoxylated tallow amine (20EO 0 D0.

Fiber process data:

Percent finish on drawn yarn by weight 76 1. 03 95 1. 08 85 Percent finish on yarn after steam jet texturing I 75 50 .58 .68 Texturing performance 1 E P P F Yarn to metal friction of text. yarn in grams 64 0 105 58 Tufting G P P F 1 Steam jet texturing at 3,000 f.p.m.E=Excellent; F=Fair; P=Poor.

3 Major part of butyl-stearate or mineral oil lost by volatization.

3 Tuiting=Tufting performance per 50 yards length of 180 ends carpet on the 30" slot type tufting machine (5/32 gauge)G= Good-Less than pull backs and less than 15 snags; F=FairLess than 5 pull backs and less than snags. P=Poor-More than pull backs and more than 30 snags.

I See footnote at end of Table I.

What is claimed is:

1. A spin finish for polyamide yarn to be processed at high temperature, said finish being an oil in water emulsion of about 10 to 20 percent by weight of said oil portion, said oil portion consisting essentially of about to percent by weight of coconut oil, about 3 to 8 percent by weight of polyoxyethylene castor oil, about 5 to 10 percent by weight of decaglycerol tetraoleate, about 2 to 5 percent by weight of glycol monooleate, about 2 to 7 perecnt by weight of polyoxyethylene sorbitan monooleate, about 9 to 11 percent by weight of polyoxyethylene tallow glyceride, and about 8 to 12 percent by weight of sodium alkyl aryl petroleum sulfonate having a formula (C H- )SO Na Where n is between about 20 and about 30.

2. A spin finish for polyarnide yarn to be processed at high temperature, said finish being an oil in water emulsion of about 10 to 20 percent by weight of said oil portion, said oil portion consisting essentially of about 55 to 65 percent by weight of refined coconut glyceride, about 3 to 8 percent by weight of polyoxyethylene castor oil containing about 25 moles of ethylene oxide per mole of castor oil, about 5 to 10 percent by weight of decaglycerol tetraoleate, about 2 to 5 percent by weight of glycerol monooleate, about 2 to 7 percent by weight of polyoxyethylene sorbitan monooleate containing about 20 moles of ethylene oxide per mole of sorbitan monooleate, about 9 to 11 percent by weight of polyoxyethylene tallow glyceride containing about 15 moles of ethylene oxide per mole of tallow glyceride, and about 8 to 12 percent by weight of sodium petroleum sulfonate present as about 60 to 62% by weight active ingredient in mineral oil.

3. The spin finish of claim 2 wherein the sodium petroleum sulfonate is based on an alkyl-aryl petroleum sulfonate having a formula (C H )SO Na where n is between about 20 and about 30.

4. The spin finish of claim 3 is wherein the average molecular weight of the (C H )SO Na is about 430, and 30% of the petroleum product remains unsulfonated mineral oil.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,565,403 '8/1951 Sproule et al. 2528.7 3,198,732 8/1965 Olney 2528.9 3,306,850 2/1967 Olsen 2528.7 3,672,977 6/1972 Dardoufas 2528.9 X 3,687,721 8/ 1972 Dardoufas 2528.9 X

HERBERT B. GUYNN, Primary Examiner US. Cl. X.R.

2872.12, WT; 1l7--138.8 N, 139.5 C.Q.; 2528.9

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE I CERTIFICATE- OF CORRECTION Patent No. 3,78 Dated December 25, 1973 m-( Robert Moore Marshall at al.

It is certified that error appears in the aboveidentified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby correctedes shown below:

Colfimn 2, line 19, "atcive" should be --active-- Column 2, in Table I, add footnote (a) after "weight", moles of ethylene oxide permole of base material- Table III, Footnote 3 11nder.item "F'f after "Less-than", :the numeral "5" should bei50-- ColuI nn claim 4, line 1, "is" shouldbe deleted. after "claim 3" Signed and Sealed this 18th day June 1974,

(SEAL) Attest: I

EDWARD M.FLETCHE R,-JR. C. MARSHALL A DANN Attesting Officer Commissioner of Patents I FORM PO-1050 (10-69) UscOMM-DC scan-Pas I w [1.5. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE "I! 0-l66.-38l,

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3954631 *Aug 9, 1974May 4, 1976Allied Chemical CorporationSpin finish for textured carpet yarn
US3993571 *Apr 11, 1975Nov 23, 1976Allied Chemical CorporationSpin finish for yarn used in food packaging
US4126564 *Dec 12, 1977Nov 21, 1978Allied Chemical CorporationSpin finish for polyamide carpet yarn
US4134839 *Feb 2, 1978Jan 16, 1979Allied Chemical CorporationSoil resistant spin finish for polyamide textile yarn
US4191656 *Oct 5, 1978Mar 4, 1980Allied Chemical CorporationNon-yellowing biocide for control of bacteria in spin finish emulsions used on nylon yarn
US4192754 *Dec 28, 1978Mar 11, 1980Allied Chemical CorporationSoil resistant yarn finish composition for synthetic organic polymer yarn
US4210700 *Sep 15, 1978Jul 1, 1980Allied Chemical CorporationProduction of polyester yarn
US4283292 *Dec 12, 1979Aug 11, 1981Allied Chemical CorporationSoil resistant yarn finish for synthetic organic polymer yarn
US4371658 *Mar 2, 1981Feb 1, 1983Allied CorporationPolyamide yarn spin finish containing a glyceride and oxidized polyethylene
US4389456 *Oct 30, 1981Jun 21, 1983Allied CorporationStabilized finish composition
US4390591 *Oct 30, 1981Jun 28, 1983Allied CorporationStabilized finish composition
US4957648 *Feb 7, 1990Sep 18, 1990The Lubrizol CorporationSpin fiber lubricant compositions
US5011616 *Feb 23, 1990Apr 30, 1991Allied-Signal Inc.Finish composition for fine denier polyamide yarn
US6365065Apr 7, 1999Apr 2, 2002Alliedsignal Inc.Spin finish
US6426142Oct 15, 1999Jul 30, 2002Alliedsignal Inc.Spin finish
US6712988Jun 6, 2002Mar 30, 2004Honeywell International Inc.Spin finish
US6770231Oct 26, 2001Aug 3, 2004Alliedsignal, IncSpin finish
US6908579Dec 18, 2003Jun 21, 2005Performance Fibers, Inc.Process for making a yarn having a spin finish
US7021349Sep 3, 2004Apr 4, 2006Performance Fibers, Inc.Spin finish
US7153447 *Jul 22, 2002Dec 26, 2006Emini ShefqetFormulation of a highly viscous mineral oil for the production of filters for tobacco products
US20020171061 *Oct 26, 2001Nov 21, 2002Ralf KleinSpin finish
US20040007687 *Jul 22, 2002Jan 15, 2004Hubert DobbelsteinFormulation of a highly viscous mineral oil for the production of filters for tobacco products
US20040144951 *Dec 18, 2003Jul 29, 2004Alliedsignal Inc.Spin finish
US20050142360 *Sep 3, 2004Jun 30, 2005Ralf KleinSpin finish
CN101949093A *Sep 17, 2010Jan 19, 2011嘉兴高科新纤维有限公司Finish for nylon FDY and preparation method
CN101949093BSep 17, 2010May 2, 2012嘉兴高科新纤维有限公司Finish for nylon FDY and preparation method
EP0119948A2 *Mar 6, 1984Sep 26, 1984THE GOODYEAR TIRE & RUBBER COMPANYTreated yarn, method of preparation and rubber/cord composite
EP0119948A3 *Mar 6, 1984Dec 9, 1987THE GOODYEAR TIRE & RUBBER COMPANYTreated yarn, method of preparation and rubber/cord composite
WO2001009427A1 *Jul 20, 2000Feb 8, 2001Alliedsignal Inc.Spin finish
Classifications
U.S. Classification252/8.84, 28/271
Cooperative ClassificationD06M2200/40, D06M7/00
European ClassificationD06M7/00