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Publication numberUS3781836 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 25, 1973
Filing dateJul 14, 1972
Priority dateJul 14, 1972
Also published asCA950062A1
Publication numberUS 3781836 A, US 3781836A, US-A-3781836, US3781836 A, US3781836A
InventorsKruper A, Reeves J, Vercellotti L
Original AssigneeWestinghouse Electric Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Self-powered wireless intrusion alarm system
US 3781836 A
Abstract
The invention pertains to an alarm system including a magnetic pulse generator for producing an output pulse in response to a change in magnetic flux in response to an intrusion of a designated area, a radio transmitter circuit responding to the pulse from the magnetic pulse generator by transmitting a signal to a remote receiver circuit which in turn generates a pulse for actuating an intrusion alarm circuit.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1 Kruper et a1.

SELF-POWERED WIRELESS INTRUSION ALARM SYSTEM Inventors: Andrew 1 Kruper, Pittsburgh, Pa.;

John R. Reeves, Orange, Conn.; Leonard C. Vercellotti, Verona, Pa.

Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Pittsburgh, Pa.

Filed: July 14, 1972 Appl. No.1 271,879

Assignee:

US. Cl. 340/224, 340/274 Int. Ch. G08b 5/22 Field of Search 340/224, 274;

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3/1960 Wood 332/2 X 6/1961 Adams et a1 332/2 X Dec. 25, 1973 3,398,302 8/1968 Harnau et a1. 310/14 3,544,987 12/1970 McMann, Jr. et al. 340/274 3,614,760 10/1971 Zimmet et a1. 340/224 OTHER PUBLICATIONS Application S.N. 271,877 filed 07-14-72 to D. M. Johnston et al.

Primary ExaminerDona1d J. Yusko Attorney-F. 1-1. Henson [5 7 ABSTRACT The invention pertains to an alarm system including a magnetic pulse generator for producing an output pulse in response to a change in magnetic flux in response to an intrusion of a designated area, a radio transmitter circuit responding to the pulse from the magnetic pulse generator by transmitting a signal to a remote receiver circuit which in turn generates a pulse for actuating an intrusion alarm circuit.

2 Claims, 1 Drawing Figure .HH HHHT 50i soi PATENTED DEC 2 5197:]

mmZmomm 1 SELF-POWERED WIRELESS INTRUSION ALARM SYSTEM CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICA- TIONS This application is related to the following cofiled copending patent applications:

Filing Ser. No. Title WE Case Date 7/14/72 271,877 An Improved Magnetic 43,127

Pulse Generator 7/14/72 271,880 Transmitter Circuit 43,128

7/14/72 271,878 Receiver Discriminator 43,849

Circuit BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The self-powered wireless intrusion alarm system described below in connection with the attached drawing includes a magnetic pulse generator including a magnet and a pickup coil assembly including a soft iron core or pole piece and a coil such that rapid movemement of the pole piece relative to the magnet causes rapid change in the flux linkage therebetween and this in turn results in the generation of an output pulse signal in the coil. The pulse generated by the magnetic pulse generator is applied to an electrically connected RF transmitter circuit which in turn transmits an RF signal to a remote radio receiver circuit. A receiver circuit in turn produces an output signal which is supplied to an intrusion alarm indication circuit.

Magnetic pulse generators of the type described in Design'News, May 10, 1967, page 204 are commercially available from the Suprel Division of Globe ln' dustries, lnc., Dayton, Ohio.

The system disclosed herein provides significant advantages over the other prior art in that it requires no separate power source to energize the transmitter and no interconnecting wire between the transmitter and receiver circuits.

The invention will become more readily apparent from the following exemplary description in connection with the accompanying drawing.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING The drawing is a schematic illustration of a typical embodiment of a self-powered wireless intrusion alarm system.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring to the drawing there is illustrated a selfpowered wireless intrusion alarm system 10 comprised of a magnetic pulse generator for responding to the movement of a monitored object, i.e., window W, by supplying a signal pulse to RF transmitter circuit 40 which responds by transmitting a signal via antenna 42 to the antenna 52 of the receiver circuit 50. An output signal corresponding to the received signal is supplied by receiver circuit 50 to the alarm circuit 60 which may be typically an audible or a visual alarm indicating device. The occurrence of an intrusion in the form of movement of the window W is manifested by an alarm indication in the alarm circuit 60.

The magnetic pulse generator 20 is comprised of magnet 22 having a north pole N and a south pole S. The magnet 22 is slidably positioned for movement within stationary housing 24. A spring element 25 acts in compression between the stationary housing 24 and the magnet 22 such that with the window in the closed position as illustrated, the linkage mechanism 30 forces the magnet 22 into the stationary housing 24 thus increasing the compression force developed by the spring element 25. With the window in the closed position illustrated, the magnet can be considered to be in a latched condition.

The linkage assembly 30 consists of pivot arm 32 which is pivoted about pivot point 33 against the tension force developed by tension spring element 34 by the actuator arm 36 extending from the window W when the window W is positioned in the closed position. This counterclockwise motion of the pivot arm 32 about the pivot point 33 causes the pivot arm to raise the mwgnet 22 within the stationary housing 24. Movement of the widow from the closed position to an open position will remove the force of the actuator arm 36 on the pivot member 32 thus permitting the spring member 34 to produce clockwise motion of the pivot arm 32 thereby releasing the magnet 22 from the raised or latched position. The compressed spring member 25 will then rapidly accelerate the magnet 22 toward the pickup coil assembly 26. The pickup coil assembly 26 consists ofa soft iron pole piece 27 and a coil 28 wound thereabout. The rapid movement of the magnet 22 towards the pickup coil assembly 26 will produce a rapid increase in flux linkage therebetween. This rapid buildup in flux linkage will produce an electrical pulse in the coil 28 which pulse is subsequently applied to the RF transmitter circuit 40. The implementation and operation of the transmitter circuit 40 can be satisfied by any radio transmitter circuit operating at a suitable frequency such as AM, FM, CB, SW, etc. which is powered by the pulse developed by the magnetic pulse generator in response to the rapid movement of the magnet 22 relative to the pickup coil assembly 26.

While the magnetic pulse generator 20 is illustrated in schematic form in the drawing, a more detailed representation and description of a suitable magnetic pulse generator is presented in the above-identified copending patent application entitled lmproved Magnetic Pulse Generator." Furthermore, while the pulse is described as being produced by the rapid movement of the magnet toward the pickup coil assembly it is equally apparent that movement of the pickup coil assembly relative to the magnet would likewise produce the same results. Furthermore, since all that is necessary is the rapid relative movement of magnet 22 and pole piece 27 to provide a rapid change in magnetic flux to produce the necessary output pulse, an embodiment equally suitable would be one in which the relative movement represents a rapid separation of the magnet and pole piece thus producing a rapid collapse of a magnetic field in contrast to the rapid buildup of magnetic flux as would be the case in the above described embodiment.

The power required to transmit a signal over a distance of between 50 to 100 feet, which represents typical positioning of the transmitter circuit 40 and the receiver circuits 54 in a security installation, is quite small as indicated by the fact that citizen band radios are capable of transmitting up to distances of 2 miles with less than 100 millowatts of input power.

While the RF transmitter circuit 40 can be implemented through many known techniques a detailed representation and description of a suitable transmitter circuit is presented in the copending above-identified patent application entitled Transmitter Circuit.

The output signal produced by the RF transmitter circuit 40 in response to the output of magnetic pulse generator is transmitted by an antenna 42 and picked up by the antenna 52 of the remote receiver circuit 50. As in the case of the RF transmitter circuit 40 the receiver circuit 50 can be implemented through the use of any one of numerous available radio receiver circuits compatible with the frequency of the signal transmitted by RF transmitter circuit 40 in response to the output pulse from the magnetic pulse generators 20. The receiver circuit 50 in turn develops an output signal for actuating the alarm circuit 6 0 which provides audio and/or visual manifestation of the intrusion represented by movement of the window from the closed to the opened position.

A detailed description and representation of a receiver circuit suitable for application in this configuration is presented in the above identified copending patent application and entitled Receiver-Discriminator- Circuit.

We claim as our invention:

1. In a self-powered wireless intrusion alarm system for responding to disturbance of an object such as a window or a door, the combination of, a magnetic pulse generator means including a magnet having a north and south pole, a pole piece and an electrical coil operatively associated therewith, said pole piece aligned with said north and south poles to establish a path of magnetic flux,'actuator means operatively connected between said object and said magnetic pulse generator means for maintaining said pole piece and said magnet in a preset relationship in the absense of a disturbance of said object, said actuator means disrupting said preset relationship of said magnet and said pole piece in response to a disturbance of said object to cause relatively rapid movement of said magnet and said pole piece either toward or away from one another to produce a rapid change in the magnetic flux and a corresponding electrical output pulse in said coil, RF transmitter circuit means operatively connected to said magnetic pulse generator means and responding to said output pulse from said magnetic pulse generating means by transmitting a corresponding RF signal, and radio receiver circuit means responding to said RF output signal by generating an output signal suitable for actuating an intrusion alarm circuit.

2. In a self-powered wireless intrusion alarm system as claimed in claim 1 wherein said actuator means includes means for maintaining said magnet and said pole piece in a latched spaced apart relationship during said preset condition, and bias means for causing rapid relative movement of said pole piece and said object toward one another to produce an electrical output signal in response to a disturbance of said object.

Patent Citations
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US2987682 *May 16, 1955Jun 6, 1961Honeywell Regulator CoMeasuring apparatus
US3398302 *Oct 13, 1965Aug 20, 1968Essex Wire CorpElectrical impulse generator
US3544987 *Feb 24, 1967Dec 1, 1970Kaiser ArthurProperty protection alarm system
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Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *Application S.N. 271,877 filed 07 14 72 to D. M. Johnston et al.
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4365238 *Nov 3, 1980Dec 21, 1982Adam KollinVisual signalling apparatus
US4538139 *Apr 30, 1982Aug 27, 1985Bolt Beranek And Newman Inc.Signalling apparatus
US4677424 *Jan 16, 1985Jun 30, 1987Gus HollingerWindow sill burglar alarm
US4803467 *Feb 23, 1988Feb 7, 1989George PetersMagnetic key lock provided with an alarm system
US5317303 *Sep 11, 1992May 31, 1994Anro Engineering, Inc.Batteryless sensor used in security applications
US5412297 *Jun 27, 1994May 2, 1995Stanley Home AutomationMonitored radio frequency door edge sensor
US5499013 *May 4, 1994Mar 12, 1996Konotchick; John A.Pulse power generator
US5572190 *Mar 22, 1995Nov 5, 1996Anro Engineering, Inc.Batteryless sensor used in security applications
US6215396Mar 18, 1999Apr 10, 2001Henry J. ScriptPortable motion detector and alarm system and method
US6542078 *Feb 16, 2001Apr 1, 2003Henry J. ScriptPortable motion detector and alarm system and method
US6828909Apr 8, 2002Dec 7, 2004Guardit Technologies LlcPortable motion detector and alarm system and method
US6940405Jul 3, 2003Sep 6, 2005Guardit Technologies LlcPortable motion detector and alarm system and method
US7113091Jul 2, 2004Sep 26, 2006Script Michael HPortable motion detector and alarm system and method
US7554445Jul 2, 2004Jun 30, 2009Script Michael HPortable motion detector and alarm system and method
US7777623May 23, 2007Aug 17, 2010Enocean GmbhWireless sensor system
US8217789Jun 8, 2009Jul 10, 2012Script Michael HPortable motion detector and alarm system and method
US8217790May 26, 2009Jul 10, 2012Script Michael HPortable motion detector and alarm system and method
US20100321188 *Feb 26, 2009Dec 23, 2010Oliver KluteTrap for Small Animals
US20110006893 *Jul 25, 2008Jan 13, 2011John Gerard FinchNotification system utilizing self-energizing switches
US20110006896 *Jul 22, 2008Jan 13, 2011Thomas Alan BarnettSecurity system including wireless self-energizing switch
US20110012730 *Jul 22, 2008Jan 20, 2011John Gerard FinchDoor notification system
EP0264491A1 *Oct 15, 1986Apr 27, 1988Franciscus Andreas Josephus Maria BrouwersSafety device in particular for cash boxes and vaults of E.G. banks
WO2002031784A1 *Oct 9, 2001Apr 18, 2002Matthias DietschDevice for determining the open state of a door, window or similar
Classifications
U.S. Classification340/539.3, 340/547
International ClassificationG08B13/06, G08B13/08, G08B13/02
Cooperative ClassificationG08B13/06, G08B13/08
European ClassificationG08B13/08, G08B13/06