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Publication numberUS3782378 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 1, 1974
Filing dateOct 12, 1972
Priority dateOct 12, 1972
Publication numberUS 3782378 A, US 3782378A, US-A-3782378, US3782378 A, US3782378A
InventorsS Page
Original AssigneeS Page
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shield for intravenous feeding apparatus
US 3782378 A
Abstract
A shield for surrounding and protecting an infusion needle during an intravenous feeding operation and for holding the excess fluid supply tubing while permitting visual observation of the intravenous fluid. A soft, resilient, non-absorbent annulus surrounds the infusion needle and has a wire, stiffening ring in contact with the top surface thereof. A transparent, flexible window covers the opening in the center of the annulus and is sealed to the top surface thereof by an annular cover. A pair of elastic bands are connected to the stiffening ring and extend across the center thereof to hold the excess tubing in place. First and second bands are connected to the stiffening ring for connecting the shield to an arm or leg.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Waited States Patent [191 Page [ 51 Jan. 1, 1974 I SHIELD FOR INTRAVENOUS FEEDING APPARATUS [76] Inventor: Sarah J. Page, 1218 Concord Ave.,

Fullerton, Calif. 92631 [22] Filed: Oct. 12, 1972 [21] Appl. No.: 296,919

[52] US. Cl. 128/133, 128/214 R, l28/DIG. 26 [51] Int. Cl. ..A61f13/00 [58] Field of Search 128/214 R, 132, 303, 128/348, 349, 350,133, DIG. 6, DIG. 16,

169,171, DIG. 26, 154

Elmquistl 128/132 R Primary ExaminerRichard A. Gaudet Assistant Examiner-J. Yasko AttorneyPhilip M. Hinderstein [57] ABSTRACT A shield for surrounding and protecting an infusion needle during an intravenous feeding operation and for holding the excess fluid supply tubing while permitting visual observation of the intravenous fluid. A soft, resilient, non-absorbent annulus surrounds the infusion needle and has a wire, stiffening ring in contact with the top surface thereof. A transparent, flexible window covers the opening in the center of the annulus and is sealed to the top surface thereof by an annular cover. A pair of elastic bands are connected to the stiffening ring and extend across the center thereof to hold the excess tubing in place. First and second bands are connected to the stiffening ring for connecting the shield to an arm or leg.

8 Claims, 3 Drawing Figures SHIELD FOR INTRAVENOUS FEEDING APPARATUS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention.

The present invention relates to a shield for intravenous feeding apparatus and, more particularly, to a shielding device for protecting an infusion needle and for holding the excess tubing while permitting visual observation of an intravenous feeding operation.

2. Description of the Prior Art.

Infusion apparatus employed in the intravenous feeding of blood, plasma, glucose water, salt water, and the like includes an infusion needle, a handle portion, and a length of tubing for connecting the needle to a source of intravenous fluid. In conventional practice, the needle is inserted into the vein of the patient and constrained in such position by small strips of adhesive tape connected to the handle. The excess tubing is then usually coiled closely adjacent to the needle and is held in place by several additional strips of adhesive tape overlying the entire structure.

With such an arrangement, several problems are present. In the first instance, the needle remains substantially exposed and may be easily jarred, bumped, and loosened by inadvertent movement of the patient. Serious injury may result by movement of the needle within the vein or, if completely dislodged therefrom, the feeding material may be lost and the patient deprived of liquid essential to sustain life. This problem is especially acute because of the fact that the tape hides the tubing and it is impossible to determine whether the feeding operation is proceeding properly. As a result, it becomes necessary to periodically remove the adhesive tape to check the operation of the feeding process. However, it is well known that it is quite uncomfortable to remove adhesive tape from the skin. Also, the needle may be displaced when removing the tape, thereby causing injury to the vein. Furthermore, the adhesive tape cannot be removed rapidly and, it will be appreciated, that there are occasions when intravenous feeding needles must be removed with extreme rapidity for any of a variety of reasons.

Adhesive tape has been used for holding infusion needles in place only because of its ubiquitous presence in the fieid of medicine and due to the lack of anything better. In addition to the discomfort experienced during the removal of such tape, adhesive tape left on the skin for protracted periods is also uncomfortable and often causes itching, skin deterioration, or various kinds of dermatitis.

In order to eliminate the use of adhesive tape, various types of shielding devices have been developed. Most of these shielding devices are characterized by a rigid, plastic dome designed to cover an area to be protected. For example, U. S. Pat. Nos. 695,270 and 703,290 disclose vaccine shields which are essentially transparent plastic domes adapted to be positioned over a vaccination and be taped in position. It has also been proposed to utilize this type of device to shield intravenous feeding apparatus. More specifically, U. S. Pat. No. 3,194,235 discloses a hollow, elongated cup of substan tially stiff material, such as plastic, which is adapted to cover an infusion needle and be secured to the skin with strips of adhesive tape. However, several addi= tional problems exist with these types of shields. in the first instance, the shields are generally made from rigid materials and do not readily conform to the shape of the body, thereby substantially limiting the possible areas of use. In the device 'of U. S. Pat. No. 3,194,235, it is still necessary to use strips of adhesive tape to hold the excess tubing. The rigid cup is again connected to the body using adhesive tape. While other devices have indicated the possibility of substituting connectable bands for the tape, such bands are generally connected around the arm or leg of a patient in a rigid manner. This is unsatisfactory since swelling of the arm or leg or movement of the patient could cause tightening of the band around the arm or leg so that the band operates as a tourniquet, cutting off the supply of blood and creating a hazardous situation.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION According to the present invention, these problems are solved by providing a novel shield for intravenous feeding apparatus. The present shield essentially completely eliminates the need for adhesive tape and all of the problems associated therewith. The present shield surrounds and protects the infusion needle and also holds down the excess, coiled, supply tubing. The entire length of tubing is visible so that the operation of the apparatus is readily observable. The shield is sufficiently flexible so that it will readily conform to the shape of the body no matter where it is located. Thee present shield is attached to an arm or leg by interconnectable bands which are connected to the shield in a manner which permits expansion and contraction thereof during operation.

Briefly, the present shield comprises a soft, resilient, non-absorbent annulus having a central opening, a top surface, and a body-engaging, adhesive, bottom surface, a resilient, wire, stiffening ring imbedded in or in contact with the top surface, of the annulus, a transparent, flexible window extending over the opening in the annulus and engaging the top surface thereof, an annula'r cover for sealing the periphery of the window to the top surface of the annulus, a pair of crossed elasticbands having the opposite ends thereof connected to the stiffening ring so as to extend across the central opening, first and second body-engaging bands for connecting the shield to an arm or leg, first ends of the bands including means for rigid interconnection, and elastic means for connecting the other ends of the bands to opposite sides of the stiffening ring.

It is therefore an object of the present invention to provide a shield for intravenous feeding apparatus.

it is a further object of the present invention to provide a shielding device for protecting the infusion needle and for holding the excess tubing while permitting visual observation of an intravenous feeding operation.

it is a still further object of the present invention to provide a shield for intravenous feeding apparatus which almost completely elminates the use of adhesive tape.

it is another object of the present invention to provide a shield for intravenous feeding apparatus which permits constant visual observation of the feeding open ation.

it is still another object of the present invention to provide a shield for intravenous feeding apparatus which readily conforms to any portion of the body surface.

Another object of the present invention is the provision of a shield for intravenous feeding apparatus which 3 utilizes flexible bands for connection of the shield to the arm or leg of a patient.

Still other objects, features, and attendant advantages of the present invention will become apparent to those skilled in the art from a reading of the following detailed description of the preferred embodiment constructed in accordance therewith, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings wherein like numerals designate like parts in the several figures and wherein:

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the present shield shown in operative position covering an infustion needle and a supply hose on a fragmentary representation of a body portion of a patient;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view similar to FIG. 1 but exploded to show the various elements of the present shield; and

FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view taken along the line 3-3 in FIG. 1.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring now to the drawings, there is shown a shield, generally designated 10, for use in an intravenous feeding operation. More specifically, shield is adapted to be rested on a body portion 11 of a patient so as to surround and protect an infusion needle 12 having a handle 13. Handle 13 is in the form of a pair of wings which extend on opposite sides of needle 12, at the base thereof, for permitting attachment to body portion 11. Needle 12 is connected to a length of supply tubing 14 which is adapted to be coupled to a source of infusion liquid 15.

Shield 10 comprises an annulus 16 having a central opening 17 of sufficient size to permit location of infusion needle 12, handle 13, and the excess coiled tubing 14 therein. Annulus 16 is provided with a flat top surface 18 and a flat, body-engaging bottom surface 19. Annulus 16 is preferably fabricated from a soft, resilient, non-absorbent material so that it is substantially perfectly conformable to any portion of the body surface. Bottom surface 19 has an adhesive thereon or annulus 16 is formed from a self-adhesive material so that surface 19 adheres to the skin, preventing movement of shield 10. Annulus 16 may be fabricated from karaya gum, an organic material commonly used for stoma adhesive, or may be made from any other suitable material such as foam or sponge rubber or the like.

Shield 10 also includes a ring 20 which may be imbedded in annulus 16, as shown, or which may be positioned in contact with top surface 18 thereof. Ring 20 is preferably fabricated from a resilient wire material and is provided as a stiffening member to maintain the shape of annulus l6 and to support the additional structures to be discussed hereinafter.

In order to enclose central opening 17 of annulus l6, shield 10 includes a transparent, flexible, circular window 21 having a diameter intermediate the inside and outside diameters of annulus 16. Window 21 may have a plurality of holes 22 therein for providing air circulation to the vicinity of infusion needle 12.

In order to seal the periphery of window 21 to top surface 18 of annulus 16, shield 10 includes an annular cover 23 having the same general dimensions as annulus 16. Cover 23 would have a suitable adhesive on the bottom surface thereof and would be brought into contact with the periphery of window 21 and top surface 18 of annulus 16, thereby sealing one to the other.

Shield 10 also includes a pair of elastic bands 24 and 25 which extend across central opening 17 in annulus 16, bands 24 and 25 preferably passing through the center of central opening 17 and being perpendicular to each other. The opposite ends of elastic bands 24 and 25 are connected to stiffening ring 20, which has sufficient strength so as not to buckle when tension is placed on bands 24 and 25.

Shield 10 is held in position on body portion 11 by first and second body-engaging straps'26 and 27, first ends 28 and 29, respectively, of which are adapted to be connected together in any suitable manner. Whereas ends 28 and 29 of straps 26 and 27, respectively, may have conventional buckles, straps 26 and 27 are preferably made from Velcro, a convenient, commercially available material which permits ready interconnection of two members at any desired points along the lengths thereof.

The other ends 30 and 31 of straps 26 and 27, respectively, are adapted to be connected to opposite sides of stiffening ring 20 in such a manner that stretching of the entire structure is permitted. For this purpose, ends 30 and 31 of straps 26 and 27, respectively, are looped so as to receive lengths of elastic bands 32 and 33, respectively. More specifically, band 32 extends through end 30 of strap 26 and has the opposite ends thereof connected to stiffening ring 20. Band 33 extends through end 31 of strap 27 and has the ends thereof connected to an opposite side of stiffening ring 20. Thus, bands 32 and 33 permit stretching of straps 26 and 27, as shown most clearly in FIG. 3. Alternatively, straps 26 and 27 may be made from an elastic material.

One or both of straps 26 and 27, such as strap 26, may have a center divider 34 of reduced thickness to permit strap 26 to be readily split in half. This would permit strap 26 to be positioned around the thumb or one of the other fingers, such as when needle 12 is posi" tioned on the dorsal area of the hand.

In operation, shielding device 10 is operative to protect infusion needle 12 and to hold the excess tubing 14 while permitting visual observation of the entire intravenous feeding operation. More specifically, after infusion needle 12 is inserted into a blood vessel in body portion 11 of the patient, a small strip of adhesive tape 35 may be utilized to connect handle 13 to the surface of body portion 11. Tubing 14 connected to needle 12 is then coiled in a substantially flat coil around handle 13. While the coiled tubing is held with one hand, shield 10 is positioned with the other hand in contact with body portion 1l,to the extent possible with the one hand in position on top of the coiled tubing 14. With the other hand on top of shield 10, the one hand therebeneath is slid out while slight downward pressure is applied on shield 10. Elastic bands 24 and 25 immediately assume the role played by the removed hand and firmly hold the excess coiled tubing 14 in position. The entire area, including infusion needle 12, handle 13, and coiled tubing 14, is surrounded by annulus 16 which protects this area and prevents any expansion of the coiled tubing 14. Elevation of coiled tubing 14 is prevented by bands 24 and 25. At this point, straps 26 and 27 are wrapped around body portion 11, such as an arm or leg, and ends 28 and 29 thereof are interconnected using the Velcro material.

The advantages of shield should be readily apparent. Shield 10 essentially completely eliminates the need for adhesive tape and all of the problems associated therewith, except for the small piece required to secure handle 13 to body portion 11. Annulus 16 surrounds and protects infusion needle 12 and bands 24 and 25 hold down the excess, coiled tubing. The entire length of tubing 14 is visible through transparent window 21 so that the operation of the apparatus is readily observable. Shield 10 and, more specifically, annulus l6 and ring 20, are sufficiently flexible so that they will readily conform to the shape of body portion 11 no matter where shield 10 is located. Shield 10 is attached to an arm or leg by interconnectable straps 26 and 27 which are connected to shield 10 by elastic bands 32 and 33 which permit expansion and contraction of the encircling structure during operation.

While the invention has been described with respect to the preferred physical embodiment constructed in accordance therewith, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that various modifications and improvements may be made without departing from the scope and spirit of the invention. Accordingly, it is to be understood that the invention is not to be limited by the specific illustrative embodiment, but only by the scope of the appended claims,

I claim:

1. A shield for intravenous feeding apparatus comprising:

a soft, resilient, non-absorbent annulus having a central opening, a top surface, and a body-engaging bottom surface;

a resilient, wire, stiffening ring in contact with said top surface of said annulus;

a transparent, flexible window extending over and covering said opening in said annulus and engaging said top surface thereof;

an annular cover for sealing the periphery of said window to said top surface of said annulus;

at least one elastic band having the opposite ends thereof connected to opposite sides of said stiffening ring so as to extend across said central opening in said annulus;

first and second body-engaging straps for connecting said shield to an arm or leg, first ends of said straps including means for rigid interconnection thereof; and

means for connecting the other ends of said straps to opposite sides of said stiffening ring.

2. A shield according to claim 1 wherein said annulus is fabricated from karaya gum.

3. A shield according to claim 1 wherein said window is circular and has a diameter intermediate the inside and outside diameters of said annulus.

4. A shield according to claim 1 further comprising:

a pair of elastic bands having the ends thereof connected at spaced points around said stiffening ring so that said bands intersect at the center of said central opening and are perpendicular to each other.

5. A shield according to claim 1 wherein said other ends of said straps are formed into loops and wherein said connecting means comprises:

a pair of elastic bands extending through said loops in said other ends of said straps, opposite ends of said bands being connected to said stiffening ring.

6. A shield according to claim 1 wherein said bottomsurface of said annulus has an adhesive thereon.

7. A shield according to claim 1 wherein said annulus is fabricated from a self-adhering, flexible material.

8. A shield according to claim 1 wherein at least one of said straps has a central divider to permit the splitting thereof.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2221758 *May 12, 1937Nov 19, 1940Elmquist FrancisSurgical dressing
US2367690 *Jul 31, 1943Jan 23, 1945Edgar H PurdyWound protector
US3103218 *Jul 11, 1962Sep 10, 1963Ajemian Edward PDressing retainer or strap
US3194235 *Sep 9, 1963Jul 13, 1965Edith A CookeShielding device for intravenous feeding apparatus
US3630195 *Feb 4, 1970Dec 28, 1971Deseret PharmaInfusion tube holder and method
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3900026 *Aug 19, 1974Aug 19, 1975William H WagnerDevice for holding and protecting intravenous injection needles
US4453933 *Nov 24, 1981Jun 12, 1984Speaker Mark GIntravenous device
US4470410 *Jan 24, 1983Sep 11, 1984Alfred J. Smith, C.M.For application to the site of an intravenous system
US4534762 *Dec 27, 1982Aug 13, 1985Heyer Hal BVascular puncture dressing
US4583977 *Aug 15, 1984Apr 22, 1986Vsesojuzny Nauchno-Issledovatelsky Institut Meditsiuskikh PolimerovDevice for lengthy fixation of a tube introduced into the patient's body
US4669458 *May 25, 1982Jun 2, 1987Conmed Inc.I.V. holder
US4777946 *Jan 17, 1986Oct 18, 1988Nakamura Brace Co., Ltd.Therapeutic apparatus to be worn on the leg
US4972829 *Nov 23, 1988Nov 27, 1990Knerr Richard PAir cure bandage
US5018534 *Mar 9, 1990May 28, 1991Grant Michael LIntravenous catheter shield and retainer
US5074847 *Apr 5, 1990Dec 24, 1991Century Plastics, Inc.Protective covering for an infusion needle of a binding agent, an emulsifying agent and an agent causing flexibility
US5109874 *Jul 18, 1991May 5, 1992Bellingham Medical Inc.Wound patch
US5336204 *May 14, 1993Aug 9, 1994Matyas Melanie EProtective cover for an infusion device
US5342317 *Oct 8, 1993Aug 30, 1994Claywell Harry MIntravenous needle anchors
US5380294 *Jan 24, 1992Jan 10, 1995Procter & Gamble Hygien AktiebolagWindowed vein catheter dressing
US5431633 *May 6, 1994Jul 11, 1995Global Fury, Inc.Noninvasive device for preventing pressure build-up in pleural space and reducing possibility of development of a tension pneumothorax from an open pneumothorax
US5776106 *Jan 3, 1995Jul 7, 1998Matyas; Melanie E.Replaceable flexible protective cover for an infusion device
US6526981Jun 30, 2000Mar 4, 2003I.V. House, Inc.Site guard for intravenous sites and other sensitive areas
US6576808 *Feb 26, 2001Jun 10, 2003Norma S. DreyerApparatus and method to protect an implanted medical device or wound
US6940000 *Apr 8, 2003Sep 6, 2005Henry DavisWound covering
US7198616 *Mar 28, 2003Apr 3, 2007Iden Mossanen-ShamsMultiport infusion device
US8672891 *Mar 14, 2013Mar 18, 2014Trenclasp LLCIV line clasp
US8708991 *Jan 7, 2011Apr 29, 20142301142 Ontario Inc.Tourniquet with disposable absorbent element
US8747360 *Dec 5, 2012Jun 10, 2014Becton, Dickinston And CompanyAdhesive backed IV catheter with auto release liner
US20130150791 *Dec 5, 2012Jun 13, 2013Becton, Dickinson And CompanyAdhesive backed iv catheter with auto release liner
WO1995025559A2 *Feb 28, 1994Sep 28, 1995Disposable Adapter Devices LtdDisposable venoclysis adapter device
WO2002002174A1 *Jun 29, 2001Jan 10, 2002Progressive Iv S IncInfusion site guard
Classifications
U.S. Classification128/888, 128/DIG.260, 604/179
International ClassificationA61M25/02
Cooperative ClassificationA61M2025/0246, A61M25/02, A61M2025/0266, Y10S128/26
European ClassificationA61M25/02