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Publication numberUS3782388 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 1, 1974
Filing dateJun 6, 1972
Priority dateJun 6, 1972
Publication numberUS 3782388 A, US 3782388A, US-A-3782388, US3782388 A, US3782388A
InventorsS Page
Original AssigneeS Page
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Medical tube holder
US 3782388 A
Abstract
An article for attaching a medical tube to the body of a patient comprising a clip releasably connectable to the medical tube, a pad having an adhesive on one side thereof for adherence to the body of the patient, and a flexible, stretechable band connected between the clip and the pad.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Page Jan. 1, 1974 1 MEDICAL TUBE HOLDER 503,973 8/1893 Lovejoy 128/349 R 3,677,250 7 1972 T 1 [76] inventor: Sarah J. Page, 1218 Concord Ave., 3,408,701 1968 Fullerton, Calif 92631 2,005,569 6/1935 Smith 24/73 VA [22] Filed: June 6, 1972 Appl. No.: 260,1 15

[52] US. Cl 128/348, 128/214 R, 128/D1G. 26, 24/73 VA, 24/81 B, 248/74 R, 248/205 A [51] Int. Cl A6lm 25/02 [58] Field of Search 128/348, 349 R, 350 R, 128/214 R, 215, 133, DIG. 26; 24/73 R, 73 VA, 81 B, 129 B; 248/74 R, 74 A, 205 A [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,702,612 11/1972 Schlesinger 128/350 R Primary ExaminerDalton L. Truluck Att0rneyPhillip M. Hinderstein [57] ABSTRACT An article for attaching a medical tube to the body of a patient comprising a clip releasably connectabie to the medical tube, a pad having an adhesive on one side thereof for adherence to the body of the patient, and a flexible, stretechable band connected between the clip and the pad.

8 Claims, 2 Drawing Figures MEDICAL TUBE HOLDER BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION l. Field of the Invention The present invention relates to a medical tube holder and, more particularly, to an article for attaching a medical tube to the body of a patient which greatly enhances patient comfort and safety during a variety of medical procedures.

2. Description of the Prior Art Many medical and surgical procedures require use of drainage or injection tubes. Such tubes include Foley catheters, bladder catheters, nose tubes, drainage tubes, intravenous tubes, and the like. In use, such tubes extend from the body of a patient to a fluid source or drainage receptacle. Between the ends of the tube, it is necessary to provide support to prevent dislodging of the tubes or fittings.

The usual procedure for supporting a medical tube is to tape the tube directly to the body of the patient. As a result, the connection is rigid and inflexible. This rigid, inflexible connection becomes more uncomfortable as it remains in place and is a frequent source of patient complaints. Furthermore, if the patient moves too far or in the wrong way, the medical tube or fitting may become dislodged. These dislodgings can result in leakage or drainage. The result is a hazardous and unsafe condition, especially if a patient is in a critical condition.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION According to the present invention, there is provided an article for attaching a medical tube to the body of a patient which not only provides patient comfort but prevents the easy dislodgement of all types of medical tubes. The present medical tube holder eliminates the rigid, inflexible attaching technique of the prior art and replaces it with a holder having a built-in stretch which permits relative movement between the medical tube and the body of the patient.

Briefly, the present medical tube holder comprises a clip which is releasably connectable to a medical tube, a pad having an adhesive on one side thereof for adherence to the body of a patient, and a flexible, stretchable band connected between the clip and the pad so that slight patient movement is permitted without discomfort or the possibility of catheter or tube dislodgement.

OBJECTS It is therefore an object of the present invention to provide a medical tube holder.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide an article for attaching a medical tube to the body of a patient which permits slight patient movement without discomfort or the possibility of tube dislodgement.

It is a still further object of the present invention to provide a simple, inexpensive, disposable medical tube holder.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a flexible attachment between medical tubes and the body of a patient.

Still other objects, features, and attendant advantages of the present invention will become apparent to those skilled in the art from a reading of the following detailed description of the preferred embodiment constructed in accordance therewith, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein like numerals designate like parts in the several figures and wherein:

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring now to the drawings, there is shown an article, generally designated '10, for attaching a medical tube 11 to the body of a patient 12. Tube 11 may be any one of the many available types of drainage or injection tubes such as Foley catheters, bladder catheters, nose tubes, drainage tubes, intravenous injection tubes, and the like. Holder 10 is adapted to connect tube 11 to patient 12 with a sufficient amount of flexibility or give to permit some'slight movement of patient 12 without discomfort or the possibility of dislodgement of tube 11.

Holder 10 comprises a clip portion 20 which is adapted to be releasably connectable to tube 11. According to the preferred embodiment of the present invention, clip portion 20 comprises a resilient annulus 21 which may conveniently be made from a plastic material. Annulus 21 has a slot 22 therein to permit opening thereof to receive tube 1 l, as shown in phantom in FIG. 1. Preferably, the plastic material of which annulus 21 is formed is sufficiently flexible to permit opening thereof to receive tube 11, but sufficiently resilient so that annulus 21 returns to a substantially planar configuration when released. Plastic or rubber materials meeting these requirements are well known to those skilled in the art.

According to the embodiment of the invention shown in FIG. 1, annulus 21 is a solid, substantially flat member. However, annulus 21 could obviously be doughnut-shaped, either solid or hollow, depending upon the materials used therefor.

Holder 10 further includes a pad 30 having a suitable medical adhesive on one side 31 thereof to permit pad 30 to adhere to the body of patient 12. The adhesive on side 31 of pad 30 may be protected from inadvertent adherence by positioning thereon a removable protective sheet in a manner well known to those skilled in the art.

Clip 20 and pad 30 are interconnected by means of a flexible, stretchable member, generally designated 40. According to the preferred embodiment of the present invention, member 40 is a conventional rubber band of sufficient stretchability to provide up to two inches of expansion. Alternatively, member 40 may be a single length of stretchable band, or may be in the form of a ribbon of stretchable, flexible material. In any event, one end of member 40 is connected to clip 20 and the other end is connected to pad 30. Such connections may be made in any suitable manner. For example, annulus 21 may be provided with a V-shaped cutout 23, spaced from slit 22, whereby one end of rubber band 40 may be positioned over cutout 23, as shown. By positioning the apex of cutout 23 away from band 40, stretching of band 40 will not tend to remove band 40 from cutout 23. Other means for connecting memher 40 to clip 20 will be obvious to those skilled in the art.

The other end of member 40 may be conveniently connected to the other side 32 of pad 30. For example, rubber band 40 may be split to form arms 41 and 42 which are positioned flat against side 32 of pad 30. A second pad 33 having an adhesive on one side thereof may then be used to connect arms 41 and 42 to surface 32 of pad 30. Pad 33 may be conveniently positioned concentrically with pad 30 and have a central opening 34 through which member 40 extends. Other means for connecting member 40 to pad 30 will be apparent to those skilled in the art.

If member 40 comprises a conventional rubber band, the two halves thereof may be positioned within a plastic or rubber cover or sleeve 50 for the protection thereof. The length of sleeve 50 should be approximately equal to the unstretched length of member 40 between clip 20 and pad 30.

In operation, article may be used for attaching medical tube 11 to the body of patient 12. Assume, for example, and as shown in FIG. 2, that tube 11 is a bladder drainage tube. Tube 11 would, therefore, typically be draped over one leg of patient 12 and connected thereto at two locations. To use article 10, the removable protective sheet on side 31 of pad 30 would first be removed and one or more pads 30 attached to the body of patient 12, as desired. Thereafter, annulus 21 would be grasped and opened, in the manner shown in phantom in FIG. 1, to permit the insertion thereinto of tube 1 1.

Once in place, clip will securely grip tube 11 preventing movement thereof. Such firm connection may result in many different ways. First of all, the inner diameter of annulus 21 may be made slightly smaller than the outer diameter of tube 11 so that a slight pinching action occurs. Alternatively, annulus 21 may have a sticky surface thereof to achieve the same result. However, neither of these possibilities may be necessary because of the well known fact that a cylindrical member passing through a thin annulus, at an angle thereto, tends to be gripped by the inner edges of the annulus and to prevent axial motion relative thereto.

The resultant attachment of tube 11 to the body of patient 12 greatly enhances patient comfort and safety during a variety of medical procedures. With article 10, the rigid, inflexible attaching techniques of the prior art are eliminated and replaced by a holder having built-in stretch which permits relative movement between medical tube 11 and the body of patient 12. As a result, slight patient movement is permitted without discomfort and the possibility of catheter or tube dislodgement is significantly reduced. Article 10 is simple and may be manufactured and sold inexpensively so that it may be used only once and thereafter discarded.

While the invention has been described with respect to a preferred physical embodiment constructed in accordance therewith, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that various modifications and improvements may be made without departing from the scope and the spirit of the invention. Accordingly, it is to be understood that the invention is not to be limited by the specific illustrative embodiment, but only by the scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. An article for attaching a medical tube to the body of a patient comprising:

clip means releasably connectable to said medical tube;

pad means having an adhesive on one side thereof for adherence to the body of a patient; and

flexible, stretchable elastic means connecting said clip means and said pad means, said connecting means being sufficiently flexible to permit orientation of said clip means in any position relative to said pad means, said connecting means also being sufficiently stretchable to permit expansion thereof and a significant increase in the spacing between said clip means and said pad means.

2. An article according to claim 1 wherein said clip means comprises:

a resilient annulus having an inner diameter greater than the diameter of said medical tube, said annulus having a slit therein permitting opening thereof to receive said tube, said annulus returning to a substantially planar configuration when released.

3. An article according to claim 2 wherein said annulus is a solid, substantially flat member.

4. An article according to claim 2 wherein said annulus is a doughnut-shaped member.

5. An article according to claim 1 wherein said clip means comprises:

a resilient annulus having an inner diameter slightly smaller than the outer diameter of said medical tube, said annulus having a slit therein permitting opening thereof to receive said tube.

6. An article according to claim 1 wherein said connecting means comprises:

a rubber band, one end of said rubber band being connected to said clip means, the other end of said rubber band being connected to said pad means.

7. An article for attaching a medical tube to the body of a'patient comprising:

a solid, substantially flat, resilient annulus releasably connectable to said medical tube and having a slit therein permitting opening thereof to receive said tube, said annulus further having a V-shaped cutout therein;

pad means having an adhesive on one side thereof for adherence to the body of a patient; and

a flexible, stretchable rubber band connecting said annulus and said pad means, one end of said rubber band being positionable over said cutout in said annulus, the other end of said rubber band being connected to said pad means.

8. An article for attaching a medical tube to the body of a patient comprising:

clip means releasably connectable to said medical tube;

pad means having an adhesive on one side thereof for adherence to the body of a patient;

flexible, stretchable means connecting said clip means and said pad means; and

sleeve means surrounding said connecting means and extending from said clip means to said pad means.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US503973 *Oct 4, 1892Aug 29, 1893 Catheter-holder
US2005569 *Sep 6, 1933Jun 18, 1935William J SmithShoulder strap holder
US3408701 *Aug 23, 1966Nov 5, 1968Richard Decker JohnClip for fishing line
US3677250 *Feb 11, 1971Jul 18, 1972Morton I ThomasTabbed anchoring tape means
US3702612 *Mar 1, 1971Nov 14, 1972Robert M SchlesingerCatheter support
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3972321 *Feb 20, 1975Aug 3, 1976Proctor John SUpper lip mounted retaining means for medical-surgical tubes
US3990454 *Feb 27, 1976Nov 9, 1976Schlesinger Robert MCatheter yoke
US4079765 *Feb 17, 1976Mar 21, 1978Vincent HatayanImplement for holding and guiding nails
US4170995 *Nov 21, 1977Oct 16, 1979Levine Robert ACatheter clamp
US4285104 *Jun 21, 1979Aug 25, 1981Permclip Products CorporationFastener device
US4351331 *Oct 31, 1980Sep 28, 1982Gereg Gordon AEndotracheal tube holder and bite block
US4633899 *Oct 15, 1984Jan 6, 1987Lord Phillip EDevice for providing a temporary remedy for ceiling leaks
US4660555 *Nov 15, 1985Apr 28, 1987Payton Hugh WOxygen delivery and administration system
US4742824 *Nov 19, 1986May 10, 1988Hugh W. PaytonOxygen tube support patch
US4986554 *Jul 25, 1988Jan 22, 1991Rathbun Gordon GTether for a drill chuck key
US5137519 *Mar 12, 1990Aug 11, 1992Cordis CorporationCatheter retention collar and support
US5156641 *Mar 7, 1990Oct 20, 1992Mayo Foundation For Medical Education And ResearchFor securing tubing to a patient's nose
US5188609 *Jul 8, 1991Feb 23, 1993Bryman Medical Inc.Swivel clip medical tube holder
US5354283 *Jan 7, 1994Oct 11, 1994Little Rapids CorporationTrocar retention apparatus
US5451212 *Jan 21, 1994Sep 19, 1995Corpak, Inc.For enteral feeding of a patient
US5735822 *Mar 12, 1996Apr 7, 1998Steins; Robert W.Tether for elongated members
US5944696 *Jun 3, 1996Aug 31, 1999Bayless; William BrianSwivel clip medical tube holder
US7011647Dec 23, 2002Mar 14, 2006Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Introducer sheath
US7066914Mar 16, 2005Jun 27, 2006Bird Products CorporationCatheter having a tip with an elongated collar
US7150737Dec 23, 2002Dec 19, 2006Sci/Med Life Systems, Inc.Methods and apparatuses for navigating the subarachnoid space
US7455666Jul 13, 2001Nov 25, 2008Board Of Regents, The University Of Texas SystemMethods and apparatuses for navigating the subarachnoid space
US7787954Nov 25, 2008Aug 31, 2010Board Of Regents, The University Of Texas SystemMethods and apparatuses for navigating the subaracnhnoid space
US8131353Aug 31, 2010Mar 6, 2012Board Of Regents, The University Of Texas SystemMethods and apparatuses for navigating the subarachnoid space
US20120289904 *Sep 7, 2011Nov 15, 2012Keun Ho LeeMedical tube fixing device
EP0972537A2 *Jun 17, 1999Jan 19, 2000Alan David MoggMedical fixation device
WO2003005908A2 *Jun 27, 2002Jan 23, 2003Univ TexasMethods and apparatuses for navigating the subarachnoid space
Classifications
U.S. Classification604/180, 24/304, 248/205.3, 128/DIG.260
International ClassificationA61M25/02
Cooperative ClassificationA61M2025/024, Y10S128/26, A61M25/02, A61M2025/0266
European ClassificationA61M25/02