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Publication numberUS3782463 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 1, 1974
Filing dateNov 14, 1972
Priority dateNov 14, 1972
Publication numberUS 3782463 A, US 3782463A, US-A-3782463, US3782463 A, US3782463A
InventorsPalmour H
Original AssigneeArmco Steel Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Power fluid conditioning unit
US 3782463 A
Abstract
A one well, self contained, wide producing range, hydraulic pumping system comprising a power fluid conditioning unit to condition produced fluid from the produced well fluid so that it will be suitable for use as a power fluid, to economically pump a well which produces medium to large volumes from average to greater depths of lift, with the operator being able to use either power oil or power water for power fluid from the same power fluid conditioning unit, as desired.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1 [11] 3,

Palmour Jan. 1, 1974 [54] POWER FLUID CONDITIONING UNIT 3,260,308 7/1966 Cryer 166/68 [75] Inventor: Harold H. Palmour, Humble, Tex. 73 Assigneez Armco steel Corporation, 2,080,622 5/1937 McMahon 166/1055 Middletown, Ohio Primary Examiner.lames A. Leppink [22] F'led: 1972 Attorney-John Wv Melville et al. [2]] Appl. No.: 306,391

[57] ABSTRACT 52 us. Cl 166/68 166/1055 417/80 A well Self mmmed, wide Pmducing 'ange, 511 lm. Cl E2l b 43/00 draulic Pumping System cmprising a fluid [58] Field of 66/68 1054 1055 ditioning unit to condition produced fluid from the 166/1056. 1 produced well fluid so that it will be suitable for use as a power fluid, to economically pump a well which pro- [56] References Cited duces medium to large volumes from average to greater depths of lift, with the operator being able to UNITED STATES PATENTS use either power oil or power water for power fluid :j from the same power fluid conditioning unit, as deorgan 2.674,!89 4 1954 Lung 417/80 2,081,225 5/1937 Coberly 166/1055 13 Claims, 8 Drawing Figures 20 an as 5 AW/ a 68 s n u 0 O a 6- 6 u 54 Fare 96 90 r /34 93 76 70 i 72 62 aQ FE i .95 6 4 64 m :v a "6; s; e

J4 45 44 TL PATENTEU JAN -1 I974 SHEU'Z or 3 PATENTEU JAN 1 m4 SHEU 3 0F 3 1 POWER FLUID CONDITIONING UNIT BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention This invention relates to hydraulic pumping systems, and more particularly, to a hydraulic pumping system which is economically applicable for the average to greater depth wells which are producing only moderate to large volumes of well fluid.

2. Description of the Prior Art The oil industry today is concerned with deeper drilling, off shore development and continued activity in the formation of large secondary recovery projects. With each of these trends, when artificial lift is required, it will be desirable to have a lift system capable of lifting greater volumes, and in many instances from greater depth of lift, requiring sub surface production units, such as hydraulic downwell pumps disposed at the lower ends of wells, which develop more downhole horsepower within the confines of dimensional limitations of the tubing or casing string to provide the required energy to lift the well fluids to the surface.

Diversified efforts are continually being made to reduce artificial lift operating costs and/or increase oil production, resulting in a more profitable producing operation and prolonging the economic life of oil properties.

The power fluid conditioning unit disclosed in application Ser. No. 132,361, now US. Pat. No. 3,709,292 filed Apr. 8, 1971, in the name of Harold l-I. Palmour, became a part of an artificial lift revolution which provided a solid-free fluid. Briefly, in this power fluid conditioning unit the well fluid and well gas from the producing well were initially directed into a pressure vessel, where water, oil and gas were separated by gravity separation, with gas being removed out of the top of the vessel and water being drawn off the bottom of the vessel and forced under pressure through a cleaning cyclone separator. The clean fluid from the cyclone separator was then directed to a power driven pump means, such as a triplex pump and from there onto the well as power fluid for the downwell engine. The oil blanket was maintained in the pressure vessel and all excess water, gas and the produced oil were directed to the flow line to the tank battery.

The aforementioned power fluid conditioning unit met with substantial success in that it successfully provided a one-well synergetic lift system which was safe, flexible and an economical method of producing an oil well. For example, since the power fluid conditioning unit combined the spent power fluid with the fluid at the bottom of the hole and then separated conditioned power fluid in the power fluid conditioning unit, it saved the surface piping as well as a string of tubing from the bottom of the hole, which were required, for example, with existing closed central systems serving many wells. Furthermore, such power fluid was kept under pressure at all times and thus not exposed to air where it could pick up oxygen and be more corrosive, as was the case with other closed water power systems. In addition, the power fluid conditioning unit eliminates the cost associated with a sucker rod pumping system. Finally it eliminated l the inventory of power oil, (2) the power oil tank, (3) high pressure power oil lines, (4) fire hazards, and (5) additional treating facilities necessary at the central battery of the usual closed central system.

While the aforementioned power fluid conditioning unit has been extremely successful, it has been primarily limited to use with hydraulic downwell pumps which utilize water as the power fluid. However, in many instances there is a demand to operate a downwell hydraulic pump on oil, because a well produces no water. Accordingly, it became increasingly evident that the art required a power fluid conditioning unit to condition produced fluid from the produced well fluid so that it would be suitable for use as power fluid, with the user being able to use either power oil or power water for power fluid from the same power fluid conditioning unit, as desired, depending upon well conditions.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention provides an improved onewell, self contained, hydraulic pumping installation for a pumping system of the type having a downwell pump which utilizes produced water, oil, or a mixture of oil and water, as the power fluid for pumping well fluids. The pumping installation comprises an improved power fluid conditioning unit to condition produced water, oil, or a mixture of oil and water, which is always under pressure above atmosphere, from the produced well fluids and exhausted power fluid so that it will be suitable for use as a power fluid, with the user being able to use either power oil, power water, or a mixture of power oil and power water, for power fluid from the same power fluid conditioning unit, as desired, depending upon well conditions. Briefly, the produced well fluids and exhausted power fluid from the well, which in clude oil, gas and water, enters a pressure-charging accumulator tank, which is equipped with a back pressure valve or a differential pressure control valve in the bypass line leading to a flow line which leads to further processing units. Under normal conditions free gas will be released to the flow line. However, if a well builds up natural pressures enough to flow, it can flow directly to the further processing units without going through the power fluid conditioning unit.

Fluid is then directed from the pressure-charging accumulator tank into the inlet of at least one cyclone separator, wherein solids are separated therefrom. The conditioned fluid discharged from the cyclone separator then proceeds into a reservoir separator accumulator tank, wherein the gravity separation of water, oil and gas takes place. This tank is provided with at least four main outlets therein. A first outlet communicates with the flow line which leads to further processing units for release of any additional free gas. Second and third outlets for release of conditioned, gravity separated, water, oil, or a mixture of oil and water, as desired, by selection of the proper outlet, communicate with the flow line, the volume of oil and water produced by the well being substantially discharged there through. A fourth outlet communicates with the suction manifold of a pressure pump. If necessary, appropriate chemicals are injected into the suction of the pressure pump by a chemical pump, and high pressure conditioned fluid is then discharged from the power fluid outlet of the pressure pump and down the well to operate a sub-surface production unit, such as downwell hydraulic pump.

As indicated, the volume of oil, gas and water a well is producing is discharged from the first, second and third outlets of the reservoir separator accumulator tank into the flow line which leads to further processing units. Solids separated by the cyclone separator are discharged with some fluid directly into the flow line and join the production of the well.

The improved power fluid conditioning unit of the present invention provides a one-well synergetic lift system which is safe, flexible and an economical method of producing an oil well, and which may be used to condition produced fluid from the produced well fluid so that it will be suitable for use as a power fluid, depending upon the production of the well. The improved power fluid conditioning unit of the present invention also possesses all of the myriad attributes and advantages of the aforementioned power fluid conditioning unit over existing closed systems serving many wells. The improved power fluid conditioning unit may be tailored to fit the requirements of a particular well with more flexibility, because the operator is able to use, as well conditions may dictate, either power oil, power water, or a mixture of power oil and power water, as the conditioned power fluid.

A BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIG. 1 is a schematic flow diagram showing a onewell, self contained, hydraulic pumping system incorporating the improved power flow conditioning unit of the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view showing the skid mounted improved power fluid conditioning unit of the present invention.

FIG. 3 is a cross sectional view through an exemplary pressure-charging accumulator tank which forms a part of the improved power fluid conditioning unit of the present invention.

FIG. 4 is a cross sectional view taken on the line 4-4 of FIG. 3.

FIG. 5 is a cross sectional view through an exemplary reservoir separator acumulator tank which forms a part of the improved power fluid conditioning unit of the present invention.

FIGS. 6A and 6B are cross sectional views taken on the line 66 of FIG. 5, showing the outlet valves 72 and 82 in the open and closed, and closed and open positions, respectively.

FIG. 7 is a perspective cross sectional view showing an exemplary cyclone separator which forms a part of the improved power fluid conditioning unit of the present invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Turning first to the schematic view of FIG. 1, it will be seen that a typical well 10 is provided with a standard well head control 12 communicating with a subsurface production unit, such as the downwell pump 14, which may utilize water, oil, or a mixture of oil and water, as the power fluid, for pumping the well. The power fluid intake is illustrated at 16 and the produced well fluids and exhausted power fluid are illustrated at 18.

The present invention provides a one-well, self contained, hydraulic pumping installation comprising an improved power fluid conditioning unit 20 to condition produced fluid from the produced well fluid so that it will be suitable for use as power fluid, with the user being able to use either power oil, or power water, or a mixture of power oil and power water, for power fluid from the same power fluid conditioning unit, as desired, depending upon the fluid produced from the well. The conditioning unit 20 includes a pressurecharging accumulator tank 22, including a back pressure valve 24 for controlling the pressure therein, a cyclone centrifugal separator 26, a reservoir separatoraccumulator tank 28, including a back pressure valve 30 for controlling the pressure therein, power driven pump means 32, and means for controlling the speed of the downwell pump 14 in the well 10, by controlling the power fluid flow, such as the valve means 34 which bypasses a quantity of clean power fluid back to the intake of the pressure-charging accumulator tank 22. Additionally, means 36, such as a chemical pump, may be provided for discharging chemicals into the suction of the pump means 32, such as an electric motor driven multiplex plunger pump 78, so that the clean power fluid passing there through acquires lubricating, noncorrosive and other desired power fluid addatives.

The produced well fluids and the exhausted power fluid 18 are pumped from the well 10 into the pressurecharging accumulator tank 22, which is designed basically to provide the release of the free gas so the cyclone centrifugal separator 26 will be charged with the I solid fluid at a constant pressure which is controlled by the back pressure valve 24. The pressure-charging accumulator tank 22, as best seen in FIGS. 3 and 4, is provided with at least two main outlets therein, a first outlet 40 communicating with the flow line 42, which leads to the lease treating facilities and tank battery (not shown), for release of free gas, and a second outlet 44 generally in the lower section of the tank for release of produced well fluids and exhausted power fluid. In FIGS. 3 and 4, the free gas, and the produced well fluids and the exhausted power fluid, in the tank 22 are indicated by the numerials 46 and 48, respectively.

A back pressure valve 24 is positioned between the flow line 42 and the pressure-charging accumulator tank 22 for controlling the pressure in the tank 22.

At least one cyclone, centrifugal separator 26 communicates with the second outlet 44 in the lower section of the pressure-charging accumulator tank 22 so that the cyclone separator 26 will receive fluid from the pressure-charging accumulator tank 22 at an optimum pressure (controlled by the back pressure valve 24) to give a desired pressure drop there across for the requirements of a particular well.

As can best be seen from FIG. 7, the cyclone separator 26 is provided with an inverted conical section 50, which may, as desired, include an upper vertical sidewall 52 of circular cross section. The apex 54 of the conical section 50 is connected with the flow line 42 for passage of liquids and solids from the cyclone separator 26. An inlet 56 on the side wall of the cyclone separator 26 communicates with the second outlet 44 of the pressure-charging accumulator tank 22. The inlet 56 is adapted to direct the inlet flow of fluid to be conditioned from the pressure-charging accumulator tank 22 substantially tangentially to the inner surface of the cyclone separator 26. An outlet 58 for conditioned or cleaned fluid from the cyclone separator 26 is provided in the upper end thereof. In operation, pressurized fluid to be cleaned enters the inlet 56 and rotation thereof, as indicated by the arrows 60, develops high centrifugal forces in the cyclone separator 26, drawing suspended solids outward toward the wall of the conical section 50 and downward in an accelerating spiral along the wall to the solids discharge point at the apex 54 and moving conditioned, cleaned fluid inward and upward to the outlet 58 as a spiraling vortex. The collected solids separated by the cyclone separator 26 are discharged with controlled under flow into the flow line 42, and join the production of the well leading to the tank battery (not shown). As more fluid goes with the collected solids, finer size separation is possible.

It should be noted that the check valve 62 prevents a back flow of collected solids from the flow line 42 into the cyclone separator 26 when the conditioning unit is not in operation. Additionally, it should also be noted that the hydromotor valve 64, which is open when the fluid level is adequate, and closes automatically when the fluid level is too low, prevents the cyclone separator 26 from losing its fluid if the well 10 continues to produce gas when a power failure occurs and stops the pump means 32. The hydromotor valve 64 is, of course, an optional piece of equiment and unnecessary when the conditioning unit 20 is utilized on certain wells.

Clean fluid which is discharged from the outlet 58 of the cyclone separator 26 proceeds to the reservoir separator-accumulator 28, which is designed basically as a free-water knockout, wherein gravity separation of water, oil and gas takes place. The reservoir separatoraccumulator 28, as best seen in FIGS. 5, 6A and 6B, is preferably provided with at least four main outlets therein. A first outlet 68 communicates with the flow line 42 through a second back pressure valve 30, which controls the pressure in the tank 28, and discharges any additional free gas from the reservoir separatoraccumulator tank 28 into the flow line 42. A second outlet 70 communicates with the suction manifold 76 of the power driven pump means 32, such as the electric motor 78 and the multi-plex plunger pump 80, for release of conditioned, gravity separated power fluid, water, or oil, or a mixture of water and oil, as desired. Third and fourth outlets 82 and 72 respectively communicate with the flow line 42 and determine the type of fluid remaining in the reservoir-separator 28. If the outlet 72 is selected to be open, as shown in FIG. 6A, the fluid in the reservoir separator 28 will be water due to gravity separation and the outlet 70 will be submerged in water and the fluid will be water. Ifthe outlet 82 is selected to be open, as shown in FIG. 6B, then the outlet 70 will be submerged in oil due to gravity separation and the power fluid will be oil. The water and/or oil in the reservoir separator-accumulator tank 28 which is in excess of that required to furnish the suction of the power driven pump means 32, is discharged into the flow line 42 through a liquid level control dump valve 84. In FIGS. 5, 6A and 6B, the separation of the conditioned, produced well fluids and the exhausted power fluid in the reservoir separator-accumulator tank 28 into gas, oil and water is indicated by the numerials 86, 88 and 90 respectively.

Selection of the proper reservoir separatoraccumulator tank outlet 72, or 82, assures that the power driven pump means 32 receives a desired power fluid for operation of the sub-surface unit 14 that is,

water or oil. For example, the two outlet valves 72 and 82 include weir nipples inside the tank 28 so that the fluid may be discharged directly off the bottom or the upper part of the tank 28 to the flow line 42. Fluid is removed through the weir nipple 94, by opening one valve (such as the valve at the outlet 72) and closing another (such as the valve at the outlet 82), and the weir nipple 94 will pass all the excess fluid not required by the power driven pump means 32 for power fluid direct to the flow line 42. By removing the gravity separated oil from tank 28 leaving clean water for power fluid. Reversing these two valves the weir nipple 93 will discharge the excess fluid leaving clean oil for the power driven pump means 32 for power fluid.

The discharge 96 of the power driven pump means 32 communicates through the desurger 98, which reduces the pulsations from the power driven pump 32 and provides a constant volume of high pressure clean fluid to the power fluid intake 16 of the downwell pump 14 in the well 10, and as long as the average pressure and volume remains the same the pump cycle will remain constant over a period of time, to pump the well 10 with a constant volume of clean, high pressure power fluid being delivered to the downwell engine of the downwell pump 14.

At this point it should be noted that the downwell pump 14 discharging into the pressure-charging accumulator tank 22, as a result of the horsepower created by the power driven pump means 32, supplies the pressure that is used to make all of the components of the power fluid conditioning unit 20 of this invention function. Accordingly, it is unnecessary to use an auxiliary power source such as a centrifugal pump to discharge the cyclone separator 26 and the power driven pump means 32.

It should also be noted that it is extremely desirable to treat the clean, high pressure power fluid as it is discharged from the reservoir separator-accumulator tank 28 so that it will acquire lubricating, non-corrosive and other desired power fluid addatives. Accordingly, means 36, such as a chemical pump, may be provided for discharging desired chemicals into the suction manifold 76 of the power driven pump means 32.

The capacity of the downwell pump 14 may be controlled by varying its speed, and this may beaffected by any suitable means for controlling the power fluid flow to the intake 16 from the discharge or outlet 96 of the power driven pump means 32. For example, the speed of the production unit can be controlled by the speed of the power driven pump means 32, if the pump means 32 is driven by a gas engine, or by a constant speed prime mover with a variable speed drive. However, if the power driven pump means 32 is driven at a constant speed by an electric motor 78, then the downwell pump 14 or production unit speed is controlled by passing excess power fluid back to the power fluid conditioning unit 20 with an automatic flow control valve 34.

Exemplary means for controlling the power fluid flow to the downwell pump 14 from the power driven pump means 32 is shown in FIGS. 1 and 2. Suitable by-pass means 100 communicate between valve means 34 and the inlet to the pressure-charging accumulator tank 22. The valve means 34 controls the speed of the downwell pump 14 by passing back to the inlet of the pressurecharging accumulator tank 22. The valve means 34 controls the speed of the downwell pump 14 by passing back to the inlet of the pressure-charging accumulator tank 22 a quantity of clean power fluid, such as water, or oil, or a mixture thereof, the amount of the fluid being by-passed controlling the amount of fluid sent to the well 10 so as to maintain the desired strokes per minute on the downwell pump 14.

As shown in FIG. 2, the power fluid conditioning unit 20 is preferably mounted upon a suitable skid 102 so that it is compact and may be positioned as desired with respect to a well.

In summary, only actual production from the well 10 (oil, water and gas) is discharged into the flow line 42 for processing by lease treating facilities. It reaches the flow line 42 by being discharged either through the back pressure valves 24 and 30 on the pressurecharging accumulator tank 22 and reservoir separatoraccumulator tank 28, respectively, through the liquid level control valve 84 on the reservoir separatoraccumulator tank 28, or through the underflow of the cyclone centrifugal separator 26.

The improved power fluid conditioning unit of the present invention can meet the artificial lift need of a variety of wells with varying producing volumes and depths of lift.

While certain preferred embodiments of the invention have been specifically illustrated and described, it is understood that the invention is not limited thereto, as many variations will be apparent to those skilled in the art, and the invention is to be given its broadest interpretation within the terms of the following claims:

The embodiments of the invention in which an exclusive property or privilege is claimed are defined as follows:

1. ln a downwell engine and pump unit which utilizes power fluid for pumping well fluid, such as oil, gas and water, from a well to a flow line, a one well, self contained, hydraulic pumping system comprising a power fluid conditioning unit to condition produced fluid from the produced well fluid so that it will be suitable for use as a power fluid, with the user being able to use either power oil or power water for power fluid from the same power fluid conditioning unit, as desired, which comprises:

a. a pressure-charging accumulator tank which communicates with said well for receiving the exhausted power fluid and produced well fluid, said tank having at least two main outlets therein, a first outlet communicating with said flow line for release of said free gas, and a second outlet in the lower section of said tank for release of fluid;

b. at least one cyclone, centrifugal separator for conditioning fluid from said pressure-charging accumulator tank by removing suspended solids therefrom, said cyclone separator having an inlet which communicates with said second outlet of said pressure-charging accumulator tank for receiving fluid from the lower section thereof at an optimum pressure so as to give a desired pressure drop across said cyclone separator for the requirements of a particular well, a first outlet connected with said flow line for passage of suspended solids separated by said separator with some fluid into said flow line, and a second outlet for the discharge of conditioned fluid;

c. a reservoir separator-accumulator tank which communicates with said second outlet of said cyclone separator for receiving conditioned fluid, the gravity separation of water, oil and gas taking place in said reservoir separator-accumulator tank, said tank having at least four main outlets therein, a first outlet communicating with said flow line for release of any additional free gas, second and third outlets for release of conditioned, gravity separated, water, or oil, or a mixture of water and oil, as desired, by selection of the proper outlet, communicating with said flow line, the volume of oil and water produced by said well being substantially discharged therethrough; and a fourth outlet pro viding conditioned high pressure water, or oil, or a mixture of water and oil, as desired, to be used as power fluid; and

d. power driven pump means, the inlet thereof communicating with said fourth outlet of said reservoir separator-accumulator tank and the outlet thereof communicating with said downwell pump in said well in providing conditioned, high pressure water, or oil, or a mixture of water and oil, as desired, to be used as power fluid.

2. The downwell engine and pump according to claim 1, wherein a back pressure valve is disposed between said flow line and said pressure-charging accumulator tank for controlling the pressure in said tank.

3. The downwell engine and pump according to claim 1, wherein back pressure valve is disposed between said flow line and said first outlet of said reservoir separator-accumulator tank for controlling the pressure of said tank.

4. The downwell engine and pump according to claim 1, wherein means are provided to control the speed of said downwell pump by adjusting power fluid flow thereto from said power driven pump means so as to maintain the desired strokes permitted on said downwell pump.

5. The downwell engine and pump according to claim 4, wherein said means to control the speed of said downwell pump comprises by-pass means communicating with said pressure-charging accumulator tank and the outlet of said power driven pump means, and valve means associated with said by-pass means which controls the speed of said downwell pump by passing back to said pressure-charging accumulator tank a quantity of clean fluid, the amount of said fluid being by-passed controlling the amount of fluid sent to said well.

6. The downwell engine and pump according to claim 1, wherein a liquid level control vavle is disposed between said flow line and said second and third outlets of said reservoir separator-accumulator tank.

7. The downwell engine and pump according to claim 1, wherein said cyclone, centrifugal separator comprises an inverted conical section, said first outlet being located at the apex thereof, said inlet being positioned in the side wall in the upper region of said cyclone separator and being adapted to direct the inlet flow of fluid to be conditioned substantially tangentially to the inner surface of said side wall, and said second outlet being located in the upper end of said cyclone separator, whereby pressurized fluid to be conditioned enters said inlet and rotation thereof develops high centrifugal forces in said cyclone separator, drawing suspended solids outward toward the side wall and downward in an accelerating spiral along the side wall to said apex and moving conditioned fluid inward and upward to said second outlet as a spiraling vortex, and the underflow of suspended solids separated by said cyclone separator are discharged with some fluid through said first outlet into said flow line.

8. The downwell engine and pump according to claim 1, wherein menas are provided for discharging chemicals into the suction of said pump means so that the clean fluid passing there-through acquires lubricating, non-corrosive and other desired qualities.

tioning unit is shut down.

12. The downwell engine and pump according to claim 11, wherein said pump means comprises an electric motor driven pump.

13. The downwell engine and pump according to claim 1, wherein said third and fourth outlets of said reservoir separator-accumulator tank include weir nipples inside said tank so that the fluid may be discharged directly off the bottom or upper part of said tank to said flow line.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3970143 *Jun 23, 1975Jul 20, 1976Combustion Engineering, Inc.Oil well production system
US3982589 *May 16, 1975Sep 28, 1976Kobe, Inc.Cleaning and pumping apparatus for oil well production
US4042025 *Sep 17, 1976Aug 16, 1977Standard Oil Company (Indiana)Hydraulic control system underflow valve control method and apparatus
US4066123 *Dec 23, 1976Jan 3, 1978Standard Oil Company (Indiana)Hydraulic pumping unit with a variable speed triplex pump
US4159036 *Jun 8, 1978Jun 26, 1979Kobe, Inc.High pressure cleaning and pumping method and apparatus for oil well production
US4848471 *Aug 4, 1987Jul 18, 1989Den Norske Stats OljeselskapMethod and apparatus for transporting unprocessed well streams
US6371145Nov 13, 2000Apr 16, 2002Dresser-Rand CompanySystem and method for compressing a fluid
US7347945 *Apr 26, 2001Mar 25, 2008Schlumberger Technology CorporationHaving gravity separator means whose geometrical separation characteristics can be adjusted during separation; to treat the effluent in the separator regardless of how the volume ratios of the various phases fluctuate as a function of time
US8257055 *Mar 17, 2004Sep 4, 2012Caltec LimitedSystem and process for pumping multiphase fluids
US8372294 *Oct 22, 2010Feb 12, 2013Future Engineering AsMethod for continuous use of a vacuum-set water knock-out circuit integrated with a hydraulic oil reservoir
US20120211445 *Oct 22, 2010Aug 23, 2012Groetheim Jens TerjeMethod for Continuous Use of a Vacuum-Set Water Knock-Out Circuit Integrated with a Hydraulic Oil Reservoir
Classifications
U.S. Classification166/68, 166/105.5, 417/80
International ClassificationE21B43/34, E21B43/12
Cooperative ClassificationE21B43/34, E21B43/129
European ClassificationE21B43/34, E21B43/12B12
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jun 8, 1987AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: ARMCO INC
Effective date: 19870327
Owner name: NATIONAL SUPPLY COMPANY, INC., A CORP. OF DE
Jun 8, 1987ASAssignment
Owner name: NATIONAL OILWELL, A GENERAL PARTNERSHIP OF DE
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:NATIONAL SUPPLY COMPANY, INC., A CORP. OF DE;REEL/FRAME:004747/0423
Effective date: 19870403
Owner name: NATIONAL SUPPLY COMPANY, INC., A CORP. OF DE
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:ARMCO INC;REEL/FRAME:004728/0498
Effective date: 19870327