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Publication numberUS3782608 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 1, 1974
Filing dateFeb 29, 1972
Priority dateMar 19, 1971
Also published asDE2206782A1
Publication numberUS 3782608 A, US 3782608A, US-A-3782608, US3782608 A, US3782608A
InventorsU Schneider
Original AssigneeU Schneider
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Safety closure for a container
US 3782608 A
Abstract
A closure having a cap for the neck of a container, for medicines, such as pills or the like, having a central socket and an entry aperture connecting the socket in communication with the interior of the container and having a removal aperture connecting the socket in communication with the exterior air space. A spherical closure ball rotatably retained in the socket so it is universally rotatable in all directions and having a depression in one surface portion thereof of a size to receive a single dose of the contents of the container and being successively rotatable into registration with the entry aperture to receive a single dose from the container, and into registration with the removal aperture for removal of the single dose from the container, the depression in the ball also being rotatable to a multiplicity of other positions in the socket where it is covered by the housing and prevents removal of the container contents.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 9] Schneider [451 Jan. 1, 1974 SAFETY CLOSURE FOR A CONTAINER Urs Schneider, Seedorffeld 6, Munchenbuchsee, Switzerland [76] Inventor:

[30] Foreign Application Priority Data Mar. 19, 1971 Switzerland 11960/71 [52] US. Cl 222/368, 206/42, 221/266, 7

215/9 [51] Int. Cl. G01f 11/10 [58] Field of Search 215/9; 206/42; 222/368, 363; 221/266 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,318,491 5/1967 Williamson 221/266 X 3,276,636 10/1966 Johnson ..222/368 Primary Examiner-George T. Hall Attorney-Brady, OBoyle and Gates 5 7 ABSTRACT A closure having a cap for the neck of a container, for

.medicines, such as pills or the like, having a central socket and an entry aperture connecting the socket'in communication with the interior of the container and having a removal aperture connecting the socket in communication with the exterior air space. A spherical closure ball rotatably retained in the socket so it is universally rotatable in all directions and having a depression in one surface portion thereof of a size to receive a single dose of the contents of. the container and beingsuecessively rotatable into registration with the entry aperture to receive a single dose from the container, and into registration with the removal aperture for removal of the single dose from the container, the depression in the ball also being rotatable to a multiplicity of other positions in the socket where it is covered by the housing and prevents removal of the container contents. Y

' 6 Claims, 2 Drawing Figures SAFETY CLOSURE FOR A-CONTAINER I certain dexterity.Such closure have the disadvantage that the entire contents of the container can be removed if a child accidentally contrives to open the closure. 1

It is the basic object of the invention to avoid this disadvantage and to produce a safety closure such that by the application of a certain dexterity or opening procedure only one dose unit can be removed at any one time, so that the possible damage is slight ifa child accidentally effects a removal.

According to the invention a safety closure for a container comprising a closure housing having an entry aperture communicating with the container space, a removal aperature communicating with atmosphere, a socket connectingthe two apertures and carrying a closure ball so that the ball is rotatable in all directions therein, the surface of the ball being formed with a depression for the reception of a singledose of the contents of the container whereby on turning the ball the depression can be brought successively to the entry aperture and to the removal aperture, the arrangement being such that a plurality of other positions of the ball in the socket the depression is covered by the housing, and an indication mark on the ball and which is visible at the removal aperture when the depression is located at the entry aperture, the part of the ball exposed at the removal aperture being accessible for manual turning.

Protrusions are preferably disposed near the edge of the removal aperture and which protrude so far beyond the exposed part of the ball that this cannot be rolled on-a flat surface, and between which a finger can be in-,

serted in order to turn the ball. I

The, invention will now be illustrated with reference to the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is-a plan view on a safety closure, and FIG. 2 is a section along the'line II II of FIG. 1. The safety closure illustrated in the drawings has a I residual sphericalzones 12 and'l3 of the surface 11 in I ball 9, so that the surface only makes contact with two order to keep the friction low. The ball 9 is provided with a marking groove 14 which is visible at the removal aperture 3 when the ball 9 is in the position illustrated in which the depression 10 coincides with the entry aperture 2. At the edge of the removal aperure 3,

two protrusions and 16 are disposed opposite to one' another and extend so far beyond the exposed part of the ball 9 that this cannot be rolled on a flat surface. A finger of one hand can however penetrate between the protrusions 15 and 16 in order to turn the ball 9.

The housing 1 is made from an elastic plastics material, the diameter of the removal aperture 3 being only slightly smaller than the diameter of the ball 9, and the wall of the part of the hous-ing'bounding the removal 7 aperture 3 is slotted at 17 and made relatively thin, so

closure housing 1 with a funnel-shaped entry aperture 2 and a removal aperture 3. The housing I is provided on the side carrying the entry aperture 2 with an 'annular channel 4 which engages an annular lip 5 onthe outer end of the container 6. The entry aperture 2 communicates with the internal space 7 of the container 6, while the removal aperture '3 is open to atmosphere.

The housing 1 is formed with -a socket 8 which com municates with the apertures 2 and 3 and which carries a closure ball 9. The ball 9 is mounted in the socket 8 so as to be freely rotatable in all directions therein. The surface of the ball 9 is formed with a depression 10 which serves for the reception ofa single dose, (e.g.,

a tablet or a pill) of the contents of the container 6. In the position of the ball 9 illustrated in FIG. 2 the depression I0 is positioned at the entry aperture 2. By

turning the ball 9 the depression 10 can be brought into the zone of the removal aperture 3. In a great number of other positions of the ball 9 the depression 10 is covered by the surface 11 of the housing surrounding the socket 8. The surface 11 is slightly relieved from the that when the closure is manufactured the ball 9 can be .pressed through the removal aperture 3 into the socket 8, the removal aperture 3 being temporarily stretched in so doing.

If the seal provided by the partial contacting of the ball 9 on the wall of the sockets is not sufficient for any particular purpose, it ispossible for a closing cap (not shown) to be provided, which can be removably turned so far that the pill 16 is held by the wall of the socket 8, the container can also be held obliquely or with the closure upwards. Before the removal of a further pill or tablet, the ball has thus to be again turned so that the marking groove 14 is concentric with the removal aperture 3, when the depression 10 again locates on the entry aperture 2. Since the marking ring constituted by the groove 14 is comparatively large, a part of this is visible in the removal aperture in many positions of the ball, so that it is easy to see how the ball should be turned. To turn the ball one finger of one hand is pushed between the protrusions 1.5 and 16.

Since the con-tainer must be held with theclosure downwards and with the ball in the position illustrated in FIG. 2 for a tablet or pill to pass into the depression 10, and. since the tablet or pill can only be removed if the ball is sufficiently turned in this attitude of the container before the container is again held with the closure upwards, andsince this tablet or pill is only removable when the ball has been further turned into the removal position, the probability that a small child can remove a tablet or pill is very small. If, exceptionally, a small child does effect the removal, it is only a question of a single tablet or pill, which normally does not constitute a serious danger. The protrusions 15 and 16 prevent a small child moving the container on a surface with the closure downwards and so rolling the ball, when under some circumstances some tablets or pills might be removed if the ball should thereby be so turned that the depression 10 repeatedly arrives at the entry aperture and thereafter at the outlet aperture.

Thus the safety closure described offers considerable security against inadvertent removal of an undesired high dose of a medicine contained in the holder.

It will be appreciated that the housing 1 can also be constituted in one piece with the container, in which case the container is filled through the apertures 3 and 2 before the insertion of the ball.

The safety closure on a container described is especially suitable for the removal of tablets, pill, lozenges, but can also be used for example for granulates or powder. The arrangement shown in the drawings ensures that powders will not increase the sliding-friction of the ball too much. With granulates or powder the closure serves simultaneously as a device to meter the dosage.

What I claim is:

1. A safety closure for a container comprising a closure housing having an entry aperture communicating with the container space, a removal aperture communicating with atmosphere, a socket connecting the two aperures and carrying a ball rotatable in all directions therein, a depression formed in the surface of the ball for the reception of a single dose of the contents of the container whereby on turning the ball the depression can be brought successively to the entry aperture and to the removal aperture, the arrangement being such that in a plurality of other positions of the ball in the socket the depression is covered by the housing, an indication mark on the ball which is visible at the removal aperture when the depression is located at the entry aperture, the part of the ball exposed at the removal aperture being accessible for manual turning, and protrusions on the housing disposed near the removal aperture which extend so far beyond the exposed part of the ball that the ball cannot be rolled on a flat surface, but between which a finger can be inserted in order to turn the ball.

2. A safety closure as claimed in claim 1, wherein the housing is made from an elastic material and the ball is inserted through the removal aperture into the socket by temporarily stretching the edge of the aperture.

3. A safety closure as claimed in claim 1 wherein the indicating mark is an inscribed circle which runs close to the edge of the removal aperture when the depression is located at the entry aperture.

4. A safety closure as claimed in claim 1 and including an airtight and detachable cap which can be placed on the closure housing to seal the removal aperture.

5. A safety closure as claimed in claim 1, including means for securing the closure housing in an airtight and detachable mannerto the container.

6. A safety closure as claimed in claim 1, wherein the closure housing is constituted in one piece with the

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3276636 *Apr 12, 1965Oct 4, 1966Owens Illinois IncArticle dispenser having a rotary trap chamber
US3318491 *Jun 14, 1965May 9, 1967Williamson Jervis CContainer having a trap-chamber dispensing means
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4189066 *Dec 4, 1978Feb 19, 1980Bristol-Myers CompanyDispenser for dispensing limited amounts of materials
US4522313 *Sep 13, 1983Jun 11, 1985Jennings Paul DArticle dispenser
US4828143 *Oct 22, 1987May 9, 1989Jennings Kenneth LArticle dispenser
US5919420 *Sep 12, 1997Jul 6, 1999Becton Dickinson And CompanyBall and socket closure for specimen collection container incorporating a resilient elastomeric seal
US5948364 *Sep 12, 1997Sep 7, 1999Becton Dickinson & CompanyBall and socket closure for specimen collection container
US6032813 *Sep 12, 1997Mar 7, 2000Becton, Dickinson And CompanyBall and socket closure for specimen collection container incorporating an integral flexible seal
US6136275 *Jun 11, 1999Oct 24, 2000Becton, Dickinson And CompanySeals for containers, sockets, supports and environment surfaces
US6139802 *Apr 9, 1999Oct 31, 2000Becton, Dickinson And CompanyBall and socket closure for specimen collection container incorporating a resilient elastomeric seal
US6161712 *Jul 3, 1997Dec 19, 2000Becton Dickinson And CompanyBall and socket closure
US6350415Sep 12, 1997Feb 26, 2002Becton, Dickinson And CompanyBall and socket closure for specimen collection container incorporating a dimple locking mechanism
US6386778Jan 5, 2001May 14, 2002The Gillette CompanySystems and methods for dispensing multi-component products
US6705482Aug 31, 2001Mar 16, 2004Steven Robert SavitzFor sealing the open end of blood collection tubes
US7686042 *Sep 28, 2005Mar 30, 2010Shlomo HaimiContents dispensing mechanism
US20130146797 *Dec 7, 2012Jun 13, 2013Pelletron CorporationRotary Valve with Product Relief Grooves
EP0901826A2 *Sep 2, 1998Mar 17, 1999Becton Dickinson and CompanyBall and socket closure for specimen collection container incorporating a dimple locking mechanism
EP0901827A2 *Sep 2, 1998Mar 17, 1999Becton Dickinson and CompanyBall and socket closure for specimen collection container
WO1985001273A1 *Jul 30, 1984Mar 28, 1985Jennings Kenneth LArticle dispenser
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/368, 215/211, 221/266, 206/807, 215/312
International ClassificationB65D83/04
Cooperative ClassificationB65D2583/044, B65D2583/0495, Y10S206/807, B65D83/0409
European ClassificationB65D83/04A