Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3783450 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 8, 1974
Filing dateFeb 5, 1973
Priority dateFeb 5, 1973
Publication numberUS 3783450 A, US 3783450A, US-A-3783450, US3783450 A, US3783450A
InventorsConnor W O
Original AssigneeConnor W O
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Hockey helmet
US 3783450 A
Abstract
A hockey helmet is disclosed in which an outer shell is formed of lightweight material generally by injection molding with three protective ribs extending longitudinally over the top of the helmet, the two outer ribs having openings formed therein. The openings progressively decrease in area as they extend from the front to the back of the helmet. The inside of the helmet has three protective pads secured to the inside of the outer protective shell so that a pair of passages are formed in cooperation with the ribs in cooling the upper part of the head of the wearer. The central pad covers the central rib and forms an air cushion for the top of the head of the wearer.
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States a Patent [191 OConnor Jan. 8, 1974 HOCKEY HELMET 21 Appl. No.: 329,320

Related US. Application Data [63] Continuation of Ser. No. 216,633, Jan. 10, 1972,

2,081,335 5/1937 Levinson 2/3 R FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 730,337 3/1966 Canada 2/3 R Primary Examiner-James R. Boler Attorney-Everett .I. Schroeder et al.

[ 57] 1 ABSTRACT A hockey helmet is disclosed in which an outer shell is formed of lightweight material generally by injection molding with three protective ribs extending longitudinally over the top of the helmet, the two outer ribs having openings formed therein. The openings progressively decrease in area as they extend from the front to the back of the helmet. The inside of the helmet has three protective pads secured to the inside of the outer protective shell so that a pair of passages are formed in cooperation with the ribs in cooling the upper part of the head of the wearer. The central pad covers the central rib and forms an air cushion for the top of the head of the wearer.

12 Claims, 8 Drawing Figures PATENTEDJMI 8 1874 sum 10? 2 PATENTEUJAH 8 1914 saw 2 or 2 10, 1972, now abandoned.

This invention relates to the field of helmets, and more particularly to hockey helmets to be worn on the head of the wearer.

Continuing emphasis has been placed upon the safety of the participants in various types of sports, and particularly those in which physical contact is made between the participants. It is generally recognized that there have been various improvements made in certain fields, for instance, in football in attempting to devise a protective helmet that will give the player maximum protection while at the same time providing maximum dexterity of the player, and with a minimum of hindrance to the players ability through the use of the helmet. In the game of hockey, it has generally been recognized that a helmet is most desirable to protect the head from blows due to falling, or being struck through body contact, skates, or the stick or hockey puck. While the general padding worn by a skater does not hinder his movements, it has generally been considered by most hockey players that helmets have been a hindrance in obstructing their vision and they quite often are fabricated of materials which are heavy enouth to cause discomfort. Perhaps one of the most annoying features of most hockey helmets that are designed to give good protection to the head, is the lack of adequate cooling for the upper part of the head. Thus where a player is actively participating and the head is perspiring, the helmet generally increases the problem and because of the moisture which finds its way to the pads and straps of a helmet, the helmet becomes slippery with respect to the head and tends to move around on the head add-. ing further discomfort and annoyance for the player.

The present invention is directed to a lightweight helmet which is generally formed of a high-impact plastic which may be injection molded to form the outer shell of the helmet. The helmet has the upper portion thereof formed with three ribs which are extended outwardly from the helmet, the two outer ribs having a plurality of enlongated openings which are transversely oriented. The elongated openings diminish in size as the openings extend from the front to the back of the helmet. Internally, three pads are secured to the helmet in such a manner as to form a pair of passages or channels which permit the air to flow over the top of the head and escape through other openings so that cooling is provided for the helmet. The padding is generally formed of a sponge rubber layer which has secured thereto some form of polyurethane, vinyl chloride, polyethylene, or some other form of foam material. Therefore, the combination just described provides a helmet which is not only highly protective, but is light weight and provides adequate cooling for the wearer.

It is therefore a general object of the invention to provide an improvement in protective helmets for use in contact sports such as hockey, lacrosse, skating, where the wearer is running or skating to impart substantial movement of the body in the game or activity.

It is yet another object of this invention to provide a helmetof lightweight material with padding in such a combination that the structure provides adequate cooling for the wearer. I

It isstill another object of this invention to provide an outer shell for a protective helmet that is strengthenedland contains cooling characteristics.

It is still a further object of this invention to provide elongaged openings and pads in a helmet to cooperate with each other and form air passages or channels for cooling.

It is still another object of this invention to provide a helmet having good cooling characteristics which are not disturbed by the thickness of the pads used therewith.

These and other objects and advantages of the invention will more fully appear from the following description, made in connection with the accompanying drawings, wherein like reference characters refer to the same or similar parts throughout the several views, and in which:

FIG. 1 is a side elevational view of the invention as seen from the right side;

FIG. 2 is a front elevational view of the invention;

FIG. 3 is a rear elevational view of the invention;

FIG. 4 is a top plan view of the invention;

FIG. 5 is a bottom plan view of the invention;

FIG. 6 is a sectional .view of the helmet taken along Lines6-6 of FIG. 4;

FIG. 7 is a sectional view the helmet looking forward i along the Lines 77 of FIG. 1; and

FIG. 8 is a sectional view of the invention taken along Lines 8-8 of FIG. 2.

Helmets of the type found to have deficiencies such as enumerated eariler are disclosed in US. Letters Pat. Nos. 3,087,166, 3,105,240 and 3,274,612 for example. A helmet 10 is formed by having an outer shell 11 formed by a molding process such as injection molding, the helmet having a semi-ovoidal shape which is larger thanthe head of the wearer. The outer shell 11 is formed from a front member 12, a back member 13, a pair of side members 14 and 15, and a top member 16 joining the other members. Front member 12 extends downwardly and terminates transversely above the eye level of the wearer, while back member 13 extends at least as low as the front member and generally extends transversely to a lower position than that of the front member. Rear member 13 extends low enough to in: sure that the sub-occipital bone at the back of the wearers head isadequately protected as well as the lower portion of the head and upper neck region. The side members are formed from an uninterrupted material, that is, the sides are not split in any manner in which they may be forced together or extended to change the size or shape of the outer shell 11.The side members include a pair of relieved portions 18 and 19 which are adapted to extend above the ears of the wearer. Top member 16 joins the front, back and two side members, all of the members being formed of substantially a single and uniform thickness with the exception of a bead 20 which extends around the lower portion of the helmet to provide an edge which is less subject to causing injury to an opposing player or the wearer, as well are provide additional strengthening at the very edge of the helmet which aids in preventing any cracking of the material. The outer shell 11 is generally formed of a high-impact plastic material. Top member 16 has three ribs 21, 22 and 23. The ribs are formed in an outwardly direction and extend generally longitudinally from the front member 12 to back member 13. A plurality of elongated openings 25 are formed in rib 21, the first opening being substantially in a horizontal or transverse position at the lower portion of front member 12 and extending towards rear member 13. The openings are formed with smooth substantially rectangular openings in rib 21 and the area of the elongated openings becomes progressively smaller in going from the front to the back of the outer shell.

In a like manner, a plurality of elongated openings 27 are formed in rib 23. Ribs 21 and 23 containing openings 25 and 27 respectively also progressively narrow from the front to the back of the outer shell 11 and ribs 21 and 23 diverge from the front to the back of the outer shell 11. (See FIG. 4 in particular) Rib 22 is a central rib which is disposed substantially equal distance betweeen outer ribs 21 and 23 and has a pair of elongated openings 24 and 26 formed respectively in the front member and rear member of rib 22 in the same manner as described for openings 25 and 27, the exception being that openings 24 and 26 are at substantially right angles to those in the outer ribs. Opening 24 is formed in rib 22 at a location slightly above the first of the transverse openings 25 and 27 and opening 26 is formed at a location slightly above the transverse position of openings 25 and 27 in the back members.

As can be seen in the several figures each of the side ribs 21 and 23 have a plurality of openings, which openings are spaced along the rib and comprise approximately percent of the area of the ribs in that portion of the helmet between the forehead of the user and the suboccipital bone region.

A pair of straps 30 and 31 are formed in a V-shape and are secured to side members 14 and by suitable means such as rivets 42. Straps 30 extend downwardly to a position below the ears so that the ears are avoided by strap 30 and a snap fastener 33 is formed at the bottom of the V-shaped member and is adapted to be connected to a mating snap fastener which is secured to a chin strap or strap to be passed under the chin to insure that the helmet may not be knocked from the head. (Not shown) A pair of side pads 34 and 35 are secured to the inside of side members 14 and 15 respectively by suitable means such as cement. A central elongated pad 36 is secured on the inside to front member 12, top member 16, and back member 13 by suitable means such as a cement or adhesive. The side pads 34 and 35 and central pad 36 are adapted to engage the head of the wearer and may be formed in various thicknesses to accomodate different sized heads. Each of pads 34, 35 and 36 are formed from a sponge rubber layer 34a, 35a and 36a and a foam material 34b, 35b, and 36b. The two parts of each pad are cemented together by appropriate adhesives which are well known.

Side pads 34 and 35 have their upper edge adjacent and conforming to the most lateral edges of ribs 21 and 23 respectively which may be described generally as an arcuate shape and is best shown in FIG. 8.

Central elongated pad 36 has its outer periphery extending transversely between the closest lateral edges of ribs 21 and 23 in such a manner that a pair of passages 41 and 43 are formed respectively between pads 34 and 36 and 35 and 36. As the wearer moves through the course of the game by running or skating, air enters openings 25 and 27 and is channeled through passages 41 and 43 over the head of the wearer. It will also be noted that central elongated pad 36 is cemented to outer shell 11 below openings 24 and 26 and may be 6 cemented around the edge of openings 24 and 26 at the upper portion thereof. By not cementing the top portion of bad 36, an air space 44 is formed between the pad 36 and the upper part of rib 22. Thus the primary purpose of openings 24 and 26 are to provide ventilation for the helmet at those locations. To provide the maximum cushioning effect, pads 34a, 35a, and 36a are generally formed from a higher density material than the other portion of the pads 34b, 35b and 36b. It will of course be understood that a pair of openings 54 and 56 are formed respectively in central pad 36 to communicate with openings 24 and 26 of the outer shell 11.

From the disclosure presented herein it will be seen that a disclosure has been made of a helmet which may be worn in contact sports or athletics in which there is provided a helmet of light weight construction, which provides maximum protection through the use of the ribbed construction across the top and front and back members. By the use of proper padding, one of the greatest disadvantages of wearing helmets is overcome by providing adequate ventilation for the wearer when the wearer is moving, thus providing cooling through the channels which are formed between the pads in the helmet. By changing the thickness of the inner portion such as 34b, 35b and 36b of the side and central pads respectively, the helmet may be adopted for various size heads with a minimum amount of fitting. The elongated holes are formed in the outer shell through the use of molding and thus when the outer shell is created, additional stress points are eliminated which are generally formed in conventional structures through some cutting process to form the holes. It will of course, be understood that various changes may be made in the form, details, arrangement and proportions of the parts without departing from the scope of the invention which consists of the matter shown and described herein and set forth in the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. In a protective helmet for use by an ambulatory wearer having an outer semi-ovoidal shaped shell adapted to fit loosely over the head of the wearer in spatial conformity therewith said shell comprising:

a. a front member extending downwardly and terminating transversely above the eye level of the wearer;

b. a back member extending downwardly and terminating generally transversely at least as low as said front member;

c. a pair of side members being formed of uninterrupted material joining said front and back members and including relieved portions adapted to extend above the ears of the wearer; and a top member joining said front, back and two side members, said members being formed as a unitary plastic body of uniform thickness, said top member having a plurality of outwardly directed ribs extending generally longitudinally from said front member to said back member, at least one of said plurality of ribs containing a plurality of smooth molded openings free of stress points disposed along said rib, said openings having an area of about 10% of the area of said rib between the forehead of the user and the suboccipital region, said openings constructed and arranged to provide a significant flow of air therethrough when the wearer is in motion.

2. The structure as defined in claim 1 wherein at least the outermost of said plurality of ribs containing said plurality of openings progressively narrow from the front to the back of said shell.

3. The structure as defined in claim 2 wherein said plurality of ribs includes a central rib disposed equal distance between a pair of outer ribs having said openings therein, said openings being elongated and having the largest dimension thereof extending transversely across said ribs, and said outer ribs diverging from the front to the back of the shell.

4. A protection helmet for use by an ambulatory wearer comprising:

a. an outer semi-ovoidal shaped shell of substantially uniform thickness adapted to fit loosely over the head of the wearer in spatial conformity therewith having a front, back and two side members joined by a top member, said front member extending downwardly and terminating transversely above the eye level of the wearer, said back member extending downwardly and terminating generally transversely at least as low as said front member, said side members being formed of uninterrupted material joining said front andback members and including a relieved portion adapted to extend above the ears of the wearer, and said top member having a plurality of outwardly directed ribs extending generally longitudinally from said front member to said back member, at least one of said plurality of ribs containing a plurality of openings disposed along said rib and formed therethrough;

b. a pair of side pads secured on the inside to said side members and adaptedto engage the sides of the head of the wearer, said pads each having an upper edge adjacent and conforming to the most lateral edges of said plurality of ribs; and

c. a central elongated pad secured on the inside to said front, top, and back members and adapted to engage the front, top and back of the head of the wearer, said central pad having a pair of edges spaced from and extending transversely between the innermost lateral edges of said side pads, said ribs and openings therein and said adjacent pad edges forming passages for movement of air over the head of the wearer.

5. The structure as defined in claim 4 including:

(1. a pair of strap members secured to said side members and adapted to extend under the ears of the wearer and be interconnected by a chin strap.

6. The structure as defined in claim 4 wherein said pads are formed from a plurality of distinct materials secured to each other in laminate arrangements, the material in contact with said outer shell having the highest density.

7. The structure as defined in claim 4 wherein said plurality of ribs includes a central rib disposed equal distance between a pair of outer rilbs having said openings therein, said central elongated pad spanning said central rib and having its peripheral portions cemented to said outer shell thereby forming an air space between said central rib and said central pad.

8. The structure as defined in claim 7 wherein said plurality of ribs have elongated openings therein and said plurality of elongaged openings have the largest dimension of said openings extending transversely across said ribs and progressively narrow from the front to the back of said outer shell.

9. The structure as defined in claim 7 wherein said central rib includes an opening at the front and back of said outer shell extending therethrough and through said central pad providing ventilation to the head of the wearer.

10. The structure as defined in claim 7 wherein said openings are of an elongaged configuration.

11. The structure as defined in claim 2 wherein said openings are elongated and the area thereof progressively decreases from the front to the back of said shell.

12. The structure as defined in claim 1 wherein the area of said openings progressively decreases from the front to the back of said shell.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION 1 Patent No; .7 3.450 Dated January 8, 1974 Inventor(s) William Raymond O'Connor It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below;

Column 6; line 30: "Claim 7" should be Claim 1-- Signed and sealed this 30th day of July 1974.

(SEAL) Attest:

MCCOY M GIBSON,;JR. v C. MARSHALL DANN Attesting Officer Commissioner of Patents

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2081335 *Jul 17, 1935May 25, 1937Standard Sports Mfg CoHead guard
US2634415 *Mar 11, 1950Apr 14, 1953Wilson Athletic Goods Mfg Co IHelmet
US3087166 *Dec 6, 1960Apr 30, 1963Stall & Dean Mfg CompanyHockey helmet
US3237202 *Apr 6, 1962Mar 1, 1966Leonard P FriederVisor detent device
US3273162 *Dec 3, 1964Sep 20, 1966Welsh Mfg CoHard hat with reinforcing ribs
US3274612 *May 18, 1965Sep 27, 1966Merriam Robert CHelmet for water sports
US3629864 *Feb 16, 1970Dec 28, 1971Ato IncProtective helmet
CA730337A *Mar 22, 1966Canada Cycle And Motor CompanyHelmet
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3925821 *Jul 5, 1974Dec 16, 1975Bell Helmets IncAir cooled helmet
US4022466 *Jun 11, 1976May 10, 1977Kaiser Thomas AHockey helmet attachment
US4044400 *Oct 18, 1976Aug 30, 1977Bell Helmets Inc.Helmet retention system
US4081865 *Jul 8, 1977Apr 4, 1978Bergee Mark AProtective helmet and ventilating system therefor
US4141085 *Sep 22, 1977Feb 27, 1979Adams Sr JohnVented helmet and face shield
US4461044 *Jun 4, 1982Jul 24, 1984Bell Helmets Inc.Bicycle helmet retention system with quick disconnect
US4519099 *Aug 31, 1983May 28, 1985Honda Giken Kogyo Kabushiki KaishaHelmet
US4538303 *Jul 29, 1983Sep 3, 1985Romer GmbhProtective helmet
US4555816 *Jan 23, 1984Dec 3, 1985Bell Helmets Inc.Ventilated helmet
US4564959 *Jun 1, 1984Jan 21, 1986Schuberth-Werk Gmbh & Co. KgCrash helmet
US4612675 *Mar 7, 1985Sep 23, 1986Bell Helmets Inc.Helmet with adjustable ventilation
US4619003 *Nov 25, 1985Oct 28, 1986Bell Helmets Inc.Insulated helmet
US4622700 *Dec 9, 1985Nov 18, 1986Bell Helmets Inc.Suction ventilated helmet
US4903348 *Sep 26, 1988Feb 27, 1990Bell Bicycles, Inc.Helmet with strap holder
US4970729 *Feb 6, 1990Nov 20, 1990Honda Motor Co., Ltd.Helmet
US5083320 *Dec 24, 1990Jan 28, 1992Athletic Helmet, Inc.Protective helmet with self-contained air pump
US5083321 *Jan 11, 1991Jan 28, 1992Lennart DavidssonHeadgear with securing structure for support straps
US5093936 *Nov 20, 1990Mar 10, 1992Itech Sport Products Inc.Protective headgear and detachable face protector
US5099523 *Jan 25, 1991Mar 31, 1992Bell Bicycles, Inc.Reinforced expanded plastic helmet construction
US5129108 *Dec 31, 1991Jul 14, 1992Itech Sport Products Inc.Protective headgear and detachable face protector
US5269025 *Oct 15, 1991Dec 14, 1993Bell Bicycles, Inc.Reinforced expanded plastic helmet construction
US5298208 *Nov 1, 1991Mar 29, 1994Athletic Helmet, Inc.Method for molding a protective helmet
US5345614 *Feb 10, 1993Sep 13, 1994Shoei Kako Kabushiki KaishaVehicle helmet
US5450631 *Sep 17, 1993Sep 19, 1995Specialized Bicycle Components, Inc.Bicycle helmet
US5477563 *Oct 21, 1993Dec 26, 1995Giro Sport Design, Inc.Helmet having a planar-molded infrastructure
US5535454 *Aug 1, 1994Jul 16, 1996Ryan; Pamela S.Protective helmet with hair entraining aperture
US5651145 *Sep 11, 1995Jul 29, 1997Specialized Bicycle Components, Inc.Bicycle helmet
US5666670 *Feb 9, 1995Sep 16, 1997Pamela S. RyanProtective helmet
US5745924 *Jan 16, 1997May 5, 1998Specialized Bicycle Components, Inc.Bicycle helmet
US5774900 *Jun 24, 1996Jul 7, 1998Institute Of Occupational Safety And Health, Council Of Labor AffairsIndustrial safety helmet
US5794272 *Jan 31, 1996Aug 18, 1998Specialized Bicycle Components, Inc.Protective helmet with improved retention system having a rear stabilizer
US5867840 *Oct 30, 1996Feb 9, 1999Shoei Kako Co., Ltd.Safety helmet and a head protector therefor
US5887289 *Nov 7, 1997Mar 30, 1999Theoret; NormandSafety cap with removable fabric cover
US5950244 *Jun 9, 1998Sep 14, 1999Sport Maska Inc.Protective device for impact management
US6105176 *Sep 17, 1998Aug 22, 2000Specialized Bicycle Components, Inc.Bicycle helmet
US6772447 *Aug 30, 2002Aug 10, 2004Stryke Lacrosse, Inc.Protective sport helmet
US7240376 *Aug 18, 2005Jul 10, 2007Riddell, Inc.Sports helmet
US7954177 *Jan 10, 2007Jun 7, 2011Riddell, Inc.Sports helmet
US7975317 *Jul 12, 2011Palmer RampellProtective helmet cap with improved ventilation
US8528118Jun 3, 2011Sep 10, 2013Riddell, Inc.Sports helmet
US8544118 *Jan 11, 2008Oct 1, 2013Bauer Performance Lacrosse Inc.Sport helmet
US8938818 *Mar 15, 2013Jan 27, 2015Riddell, Inc.Sports helmet
US9289024May 2, 2011Mar 22, 2016Riddell, Inc.Protective sports helmet
US9320311Mar 14, 2013Apr 26, 2016Intellectual Property Holdings, LlcHelmet impact liner system
US9398783Jul 3, 2013Jul 26, 2016Kranos Ip CorporationHelmet with shell having raised central channel and ear holes with abutting slopped banks
US20040040073 *Aug 30, 2002Mar 4, 2004David MorrowProtective sport helmet
US20050278835 *Aug 18, 2005Dec 22, 2005Ide Thad MSports helmet
US20060031978 *Aug 10, 2004Feb 16, 2006Pierce Brendan EVentilated helmet system
US20060191060 *Feb 28, 2005Aug 31, 2006Palmer RampellProtective helmet cap with improved ventilation
US20070192944 *Jan 10, 2007Aug 23, 2007Ide Thad MSports helmet
US20090178184 *Jul 16, 2009Brine Iii William HSport helmet
US20130000017 *Jan 3, 2013Intellectual Property Holdings, LlcHelmet impact liner system
USD749272Feb 24, 2014Feb 9, 2016Matscitechno Licensing CompanyHelmet padding system
USD752824 *Aug 24, 2015Mar 29, 2016Matscitechno Licensing CompanyHelmet padding system
USD754930 *Aug 24, 2015Apr 26, 2016Matscitechno Licensing CompanyHelmet padding system
USRE34699 *Feb 3, 1993Aug 23, 1994Itech Sport Products Inc.Protective headgear and detachable face protector
EP0090720A1 *Mar 22, 1983Oct 5, 1983Regie Nationale Des Usines RenaultCyclist's helmet with an alveolus structure
EP0096148A1 *Jun 10, 1982Dec 21, 1983Ab Akta BarnsäkerhetA helmet for use in recreational activity
EP0571065A1 *Feb 18, 1993Nov 24, 1993Shoei Kako Kabushiki KaishaHelmet
WO1992008380A2 *Nov 20, 1991May 29, 1992636729 Ontario Ltd.Protective headgear and detachable face protector
WO1992008380A3 *Nov 20, 1991Mar 4, 1993Ontario Ltd 636729Protective headgear and detachable face protector
WO2004014168A2 *Aug 8, 2003Feb 19, 2004Schneider Marc SEnergy absorbing sports helmet
WO2004014168A3 *Aug 8, 2003May 21, 2004Marc S SchneiderEnergy absorbing sports helmet
Classifications
U.S. Classification2/421, 2/425
International ClassificationA42B3/28, A42B3/04, A42B3/12
Cooperative ClassificationA42B3/28, A42B3/124
European ClassificationA42B3/28, A42B3/12C