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Publication numberUS3783534 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 8, 1974
Filing dateMay 14, 1973
Priority dateMay 14, 1973
Publication numberUS 3783534 A, US 3783534A, US-A-3783534, US3783534 A, US3783534A
InventorsFluharty G, Phillips R
Original AssigneeFluharty G, Phillips R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Protective boot
US 3783534 A
Abstract
A protective boot designed especially for wear by motorcycle riders, particularly in off-the-road or trail riding, and in racing. The boat includes a protective front tongue extending from a hinged attachment near the toe, in covering relation to the boot laces and the wearer's shin. The tongue includes, between two layers of leather, a rigid shin protector. Similar rigid lower leg protectors are provided on both sides of the wearer's legs above the ankle, between two layers of the boots. The tongue is held in place by straps at the top and bottom which pass through loops attached in pairs to the back strap of the boot. The lower pair of loops also serves as an anchoring means for straps holding a "steel shoe" in place over the sole and toe of the left boot which is dragged when rounding corners.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Phillips et al.

[ PROTECTIVE BOOT Filed:

Inventors: Richard F. Phillips, Hillside Dr.,

Kirkwood, NY. 13795; Gordon S. Fluharty, R.D. No. 1, Box 7, Chenango Forks, NY. 13746 May 14, 1973 Appl. No.: 360,052

US. Cl. 36/72 R, 36/2.5 R, 36/54 Int. Cl A43b 13/22 Field of Search 36/72 R, 2.5 AK, 36/2.5 R, 2.5 A, 5 H

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS Hilgert 36/54 Clark 36/2.5 R Porter; 36/72 R Edwards et a1. 36/72 R Corry 3672.5 R

m1 3,783,534 '[4 1 Jan. 8, 1974 Primary Examiner-Alfred R. Guest [5 7] ABSTRACT A protective boot designed especially for wear by motorcycle riders, particularly in off-the-road or trail riding, and in racing. The boot includes aprotectjvefront to ng ue extendmg from a hinged attachment near the toe, in covering relation to the boot laces and the wearers shin. The tongue includes, between two layers of leather, .a rigid shin protector. Similar rigid lower leg protectors are provided on both sides of the wearers legs above the ankle, between two layers of the bootsnThe tongue is held in place by straps at the top and bottom which pass through loops attached in pairs to the back strap of the boot. The lower pair of loops also serves as an anchoring means for straps holding a steel shoe in place over the sole and toe of the left boot which is dragged when rounding corners.

8 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures PROTECTIVE BOOT BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION injuries. The boots are normally of substantially the same design and construction as any other work or sports boot, being made of heavy material and covering a substantial part of the wearers lower leg, but having few other features specifically applicable to motorcycle riding.

It is a principal object of'thepresent invention to provide a protective boot especially useful to off-the-road motorcycle riders.

A further object is to provide a boot which is attractive and stylish while offering superior safety features, protecting the wearers foot and lower legs against injury by items by which they may be struck as, for example, when the wearer is riding a motorcycle.

Other objects will in part be obvious and will in part appear hereinafter.

BRIEF SUMMARY The motorcycle boot of the present invention includes the same basic sole and upper design as other boots, lacing up the front and extending to near knee height. In addition, an outer tongue is hingedly movable about an attachment near the toe into and away from closely covering relationto the front of the boot, including the laces. The tongue carries between two layers thereof a rigid strip of material such as highimpact plastic to protect the wearers shin. Similar protective, rigid strips are provided in the sides of the boots. A protective or reinforcing strip is also provided in the sole of the boot, below the wearers arch. A pair of loops are affixed to the upper rear of the boot, preferably on each side of the back strap. A second pair of such loops are affixed to the lower rear of the boot. These loops serve as anchors and/or guides for straps attached to and extending from each side of the protective tongue. The lower pair of loops serves the same purpose for straps connected to a steel shoe of the type worn over the sole and heel of one boot to be dragged on the ground while rounding corners.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the preferred embodiment, shown without laces and with the protective tongue away from the boot front; 3

FIG. 2 is a similar perspective view, showing the boot in phantom and the protective, rigid portions in solid lines;

FIG. 3 is a rear elevational view of the boot;

FIG. 4 is a plan view of the sole; and

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary, side elevational view showing the lower portion of a boot with a steel shoe in place thereon.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION The boot is designated generally by reference numeraI l0, and comprises sole 12 and upper 14, the latter including toe l6, heel 18, sides 20 and back strap 22. Eyelets 24 are provided in two rows down the spaced front edges of sides 20 to accommodate laces (not shown). The front of sides 20 are connected rearwardly of eyelets 24 by a continuous gusset 26. Boot 10 is preferably of waterproof construction and gusset 26 contributes to the watertight integrity. Pull strap 28 is provided to assist in putting on the boots.

Protective tongue 30 is hingedly attached to boot 10 near toe 16. An extending portion of tongue 30 is covered by triangular metal plate 32 and secured to the boot by rivets 34. Tongue 30 may be moved about its hinged connection into and away from closely covering relation to the entire front of the boot, covering entirely the laces and eyelets 24. Straps 36 extend from I each side of tongue 30 to secure the latter in its covering position.'Preferably, the upper and lower straps are each a single piece of leather, extending between two layers of tongue 30.

Turning now to FIG. 2, the protective or reinforcing portions of the boot are shown. Steel strip 38 is embedded in sole 12 below the wearers arch, thus serving to protect the foot when the arch of the boot is rested on the motorcycle foot peg. Steel toe 39 is provided in the usual manner of safety boots. Steel plate 41 is embedded in the forward part of sole l2, flush with the front surface thereof. Solid, rigid strip 40 is secured between two layers of material which make up tongue 30. Similar rigid strips 42 and 43 are secured between two layers of sides 20. These strips may be of metal, or other suitable material, but are preferably of high-impact type plastic. The strips are contoured slightly, to conform generally tothat portion of the wearers legwhich they cover. Strip 40 thus forms an effective shield for the wearers shin, and strip 42 does likewise for the outside of the lower leg, fora substantial portion of the distance between the ankle and knee. The lower edge of strip 42 preferably is just above the wearers ankle to allow freedom of movement. Strip 43 corresponding in size, shape and position to strip 42, is provided on the opposite side 20 of boot v10, to lie along the inside of the wearers leg. Although. the inside of the leg is not as exposed, and therefore generally not as susceptible to injury by striking objects, a protective strip on the inside side of the boot is effective in preventing injuries due to the wearers leg being forced against portions of the motorcycle.

In FIG. 3 the rearof boot 10 is shown, with the aforementioned pairs of loops attached thereto. Upper loops 44 are attached by rivets 46 to each side of back strap 22 near the top of boot 10. Lower loops 50 are similarly secured by rivets 52 roughly adjacent the lower edge of strip 42. The loops are preferably of non-corrosive metal, hinged to the base through which the rivets pass. The upper and lower straps 36 may be passed through the respective adjacent loops 44 and 50 to be tied either at the rear (FIG. 3) or the front (FIG. 5) of boot 10 to maintain tongue 30 in closely covering relation to the front of the boot. Straps 36 each pass through tongue 30 on the forward side of strip 40, whereby the protective strip is urged into close engagement with the front of the boot when straps 36 are tightened.

FIG. 4 shows in plan view the position of reinforcing strip 38 in sole 12.

FIG. 5, a lower fragment of boot 10 is shown with socalled steel shoe 52 attached thereto. Steel shoe 52 is of a type commonly worn by motorcycle riders since one foot is dragged on the ground when making sharp turns in order to stabilize the cycle. Steel shoe 52 as shown in FIG. comprises a hollow forward portion 54 into which toe 16 of boot may be inserted, and a flat base 56 having a peripheral, upturned flange 58 conforming generally to the external periphery of boot sole 12. Two straps 60 are affixed to each side of flange 58 and carry spring clips 62 on the free ends thereof. Straps 60 are of such length that the forward strap on each side may be clipped to therear loop 48 on the same side, and the rear strap on each side passed around the front of the boot and clipped to the rear loop 48 on the opposite side to secure steel shoe 52 in place. Straps 60 may be somewhat shorter than the distance between their connections with the steel shoe and the loop to which they are to be attached and made of an elastic material so as to maintain the steel shoe more firmly in place. Alternatively, spring clips 62 may be omitted and the straps made somewhat longer so that they may pass through loops 48 and be tied in the same manner as straps 36.

The foregoing disclosure has set forth a protective boot construction which is uniquely adapted to minimize the danger of injury to the wearers feet and lower legs. Although the boot is not intended for wear when walking for substantial distances, it nevertheless allows sufficient freedom of movement and flexure so as not to be unduly restrictive or uncomfortable for limited periods. The protective tongue not only provides means for guarding the front of the wearers leg, but insures that no external objects can become caught on the boot laces. This is especially important when the boots are worn in motorcycle trail riding where brush, and the like, is often striking the cyclists legs. The cooperative strap and loop structure provides sturdy and convenient means for securing elements of the boot and/or a cooperative steel shoe.

What is claimed is: v

l. A protective boot for use in motorcycle riding, and the like, comprising in combination:

a. a sole portion;

b. an upper portion enclosing the wearers foot and leg at least half the distance to the knee;

c. said upper portion completely encircling the wearers leg over the entire height thereof, and including a frontal gusset allowing circumferential expansion and closure means for tightening said upper portion around the wearers leg;

d. a protective frontal cover member attached to said upper portion along a transverse line between the toe and instep below said closure means and 4. hingedly movable into closely covering relation to the front of the boot from said transverse line to the top of the boot;

e. two tie straps attached to said cover member with one strap from opposite sides thereof near the top and the other intermediate of said one pair and said transverse line;

f. two pairs of loops attached to said upper portion rearwardly adjacent the position of attachment of said straps to said cover member;

g. said upper portion and cover member each having two superposed layers of material;

h. first and second elongatedstrips of rigid material secured between said layers of said upper portion on the sides thereof adjacent the inside and outside of the wearers legs and extending from near the top to at least the position adjacent the top of the wearers ankle; and

i. a third elongated strip of rigid material secured between said layers of said frontal cover member and extending from near the top thereof to a position adjacent the wearers instep.

2. The combination according to claim 1 and further including a reinforcing strip of rigid material embedded in said sole portion and extending longitudinally thereof in the portion adjacent the arch of the wearers .foot.

3. The combination according to claim 1 wherein said frontal cover member is in the nature of a tongue secured to the outer surface of the boot by a plate arranged in covering relation to a portion of said cover member extending below said transverse line.

4. The combination according to claim 1 wherein said upper portion includes two sides joined at the back of the boot by a back strap extending vertically up the back, said loops being secured to said back strap.

5. The combination according to claim 1 and further including a steel shoe arranged in covering relation to at least said sole portion and having attached thereto a plurality of straps adapted for engagement through said loops.

6. The combination according to claim 5 wherein said steel shoe straps carry clips on the free ends thereof, each of said straps being of such length that engagement of said clips with selected ones of said loops is effective to secure said steel shoe to said boot.

7.'The invention according to claim 6 wherein said straps are of elastic material and of such length that they are stretched when secured to said loops, thereby biasing said steel shoe into close engagement with said boot.

8. The invention according to claim 1 wherein said tie straps each extend between two layers of said frontal cover member forwardly of said third strip.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1781950 *Nov 23, 1927Nov 18, 1930Lurella HarperTongue for shoes
US2619741 *Sep 16, 1950Dec 2, 1952Arnold Clark JohnInsulated shoe construction
US2772489 *Jan 3, 1956Dec 4, 1956Miner Rubber Company LtdManufacture of footwear
US3334427 *Mar 4, 1965Aug 8, 1967Int Shoe CoSplash and instep guard combination for boot-type shoe
US3531878 *Jan 17, 1969Oct 6, 1970Servus Rubber Co TheFootwear incorporating a shin protection device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4143474 *Mar 2, 1978Mar 13, 1979Garmont S.P.A.Skiboot
US5491910 *Oct 11, 1994Feb 20, 1996Nordica SpaSealing device for ski boots
US5701688 *Apr 18, 1996Dec 30, 1997Fila U.S.A., Inc.Protective shoelace cover
US6336220Sep 13, 2000Jan 8, 2002Trauma-Lite LimitedProtective element
US7125392 *Aug 15, 2003Oct 24, 2006Oregon Orthotic System, Inc.Ankle-foot orthotic device and method
US7207126 *Jan 22, 2001Apr 24, 2007Salomon S.A.Movable cover for rigidifying and/ or protecting the front face of an article of footwear, such as a snowboard boot
US7441351Aug 17, 2005Oct 28, 2008The Timberland CompanyFootwear for hostile environments
US7530182Jul 17, 2006May 12, 2009Fox Racing, Inc.Molded gasket for footwear
US7530183Jul 17, 2006May 12, 2009Fox Racing, Inc.Fold-over thermal laminate for footwear
US7690048Mar 14, 2007Apr 6, 2010Brandt Jerry WWarming apparatus for motorcyclist
US7866065Jul 17, 2006Jan 11, 2011Fox Head, Inc.Integrated buckle strap receiver for footwear
US7958655Feb 5, 2009Jun 14, 2011Fox Head, Inc.Fold-over thermal laminate for footwear
US8056266 *Jul 27, 2007Nov 15, 2011Andrew Curran DawsonPant-leg-covers for modified footwear, conventional footwear, and other foot-receiving apparatuses
US8161664 *Jul 27, 2007Apr 24, 2012Andrew Curran DawsonPant-leg-covers for modified footwear, conventional footwear, and other foot-receiving apparatuses
US8245418 *Mar 1, 2008Aug 21, 2012Paintin Janet AFront-opening footwear systems
US9635902Mar 13, 2014May 2, 2017Tbl Licensing LlcSafety footwear
US20020133979 *Jan 22, 2001Sep 26, 2002Alain GantierArticulated tilting tongue for rigidifying and/or protecting the front face of a shoe and more particularly a snow surf boot
US20050038365 *Aug 15, 2003Feb 17, 2005Scott Kyle R.Ankle-foot orthotic device and method
US20070101615 *Jul 17, 2006May 10, 2007Fox Racing, Inc.Integrated buckle strap receiver for footwear
US20070101616 *Jul 17, 2006May 10, 2007Fox Racing, Inc.Molded gasket for footwear
US20070118975 *Jul 17, 2006May 31, 2007Fox Racing, Inc.Fold-over thermal laminate for footwear
US20080222765 *Mar 14, 2007Sep 18, 2008Brandt Jerry WWarming apparatus for motorcyclist
US20090188133 *Feb 5, 2009Jul 30, 2009Fox Racing, Inc.Fold-over thermal laminate for footwear
US20090217552 *Mar 1, 2008Sep 3, 2009Paintin Janet AFront-opening footwear systems
US20150196094 *Jan 14, 2015Jul 16, 2015Randy L. HansenFootwear Articles with Extension Apparatuses and Methods of Using the Same
DE29607757U1 *Apr 30, 1996Jan 23, 1997Schabsky Atlas SchuhfabSicherheitsstiefel
EP0986969A1 *Sep 9, 1999Mar 22, 2000Axo Sport S.p.A.Boot particularly for motorcycling
EP2203083A1 *Jan 18, 2008Jul 7, 2010Mercury International Trading CorporationFootwear with pivoting tongue
EP2203083A4 *Jan 18, 2008Nov 28, 2012Mercury Internat Trading CorpFootwear with pivoting tongue
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/72.00R, 36/54, 36/131
International ClassificationA43B5/00, A43B5/14
Cooperative ClassificationA43B5/145
European ClassificationA43B5/14B