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Publication numberUS3783599 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 8, 1974
Filing dateJul 14, 1972
Priority dateJul 15, 1971
Also published asDE2235584A1, DE7226915U
Publication numberUS 3783599 A, US 3783599A, US-A-3783599, US3783599 A, US3783599A
InventorsTanaka K
Original AssigneeCitizen Watch Co Ltd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Alarm timepiece
US 3783599 A
Abstract
An alarm mechanism having an improved presetting device for use in a small timepiece, especially an alarm watch. A multi-point presetter is provided comprising a unique memory device comprising in turn a stationary preset ring having a number of substantially inwardly extending elongated resilient spring contact arms, on the one hand, and an alarm switch disc which is arranged to rotate in unison with the hour hand of the watch movement, on the other. When a manipulating crown or knob is turned so as to bring the alarm switch disc to a certain predetermined position corresponding to a first alarm time point, and it is pulled in. Then, a corresponding one of the spring contact arm is forcibly transferred from below to the top of the disc, so as to occupy a preset memory position. Second and further presetting operations can be performed in the similar way as above. When the hour hand arrives at the earlier preset position, a conductive layer or member provided on the disc is brought into electrical connection with the preset one of the contact arms, so as to energize an electrical alarming buzzer.
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United States Patent [191 Tanaka ALARM TIMEPIECE [75] Inventor: Kazuo Tanaka, Tokyo, Japan [73] Assignee: Citizen Watch Company Limited,

Tokyo, Japan [22] Filed: July 14, 1972 [2]] Appl. No.: 271,727

[30] Foreign Application Priority Data '3/1957 Schwab Primary Examiner-George H. Miller, Jr. Attorney-Holman et al.

[111 3,783,599 [451 Jan. 1974 [5 7] ABSTRACT An alarm mechanism having an improved presetting device for use in a small timepiece, especially an alarm watch. A multi-pointpresetter is provided comprising a unique memory device comprising in turn a stationary preset ring having a number of substantially inwardly extending elongated resilient spring contact arms, on the one hand, and an alarm switch disc which is arranged to rotate in unison with the hour hand of the watch movement, on the other. When a manipulating crown or'knob is turned so as to bring the alarm switch disc to a certain predetermined position corresponding to a first alarm time point, and it is pulled in. Then, a corresponding one of the spring contact arm is forciblytransferred from 'below to the top. of the disc, so as to occupy a preset memory position. Second and further presetting operations canbe performed in the similar way as above. When the hour hand arrives at the earlier'preset position, a conductive layer or member provided on the disc is brought into electrical connection with the preset one of the contact arms, so as to energize an electrical alarming buzzer.

11 Claims, 10 Drawing Figures PAIENTEUJKN 8 m4 SHiEI 1 BF 3 FIG. I

FIG. 3

ALARM TIMEPIECE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates generally to small timepieces, especially watches, fitted with alarm mechanism. More specifically, it relates to the alarm mechanism, capable of delivery of alarm signals successively at several preset time points.

Conventional alarm watches have generally been so designed that only one alarm time point is presettable at once thus multi-time points being unable to preset. When it is desired to issue acoustic alarm signals at su'ccessive several time points, successive and complex preset operations must be carried out each time upon issuance of respective alarm signals.

On the other hand, a specifically designed multipresettable alarm timepiece is disclosed inU. S. Pat. No. 2,786,524. This prior alarm timepiece includes a series of rods radially located underneath the dial in a plane parallel to the latter and adapted to be shifted selectively along their axes so as to occupy either of two positions, an inoperative position and an operative position for which latter the inner end of the radially shifted rod lies in the path of a feeler arm revolving with the hour wheel and adapted to release the alarm signal whenever it engages any of the rods shifted into their operative position. Since this prior alarm timepiece is fitted with a large number of radially slidable rods, each of the latter carrying at its outer end a control knob, as referred to above, this mechanism is highly complicated and and rather spacious and thus practically impossible to fit it to a watch. Problems are also arisen from the point of the water tightness to be attained.

An object of the present invention is to provide an alarm timepiece, especially watch, capable of obviating the aforementioned conventional drawbacks.

A further object is to provide an alarm watch of the above kind which is multi-settable to several preferred alarming time points and capable of delivery of acoustic alarm signal at arrival of each of the once preset time points.

These and further objects, features and advantages of the invention will become more apparent when read the following detailed description'of the invention by reference to the accompanying drawings illustrative of several preferred embodiments of the invention.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a part of a schematic plan view of a watch embodying a preferred first embodiment of the improved alarm mechanism according to this invention, wherein, however, the crystal glass, time display dial and minute-and seconds hands have been omitted for showing more clearly the inner working parts.

FIG. 2 is a sectional view of the watch of FIG. 1 taken substantially along a section line II-II' shown therein, wherein a preset button is kept at its regular position.

FIG. 3 isa similar view to FIG. 2, wherein, however, said preset button has been pushed-in from the position shown therein, and brought into its presetting position.

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of a preset ring and its related several operating members employed in the foregoing embodiment.

FIG. 5 is an enlarged sectional view taken substantially along a, section line V-V' shown in FIG. 4, wherein, however, the preset ring is shown at its two different positions for demonstrating clearlyits functional operation. 7

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of a watch movement fitted with the improved alarm mechanism according to the second embodiment of the invention, wherein, however, the time-indicating hands and the timeindicating dial have been removed for showing more clearly inner operating parts and several preferred parts-have been sectioned or broken away for the same purpose.

FIG. 7 is a simplified view of FIG. 6, for demonstrating clearly inner operating parts for the preset ring.

FIG. 8 is an enlarged and partial plan view of a slight modification of a mulit-contact presetter ring which has been employed in the foregoing embodiments.

FIG. 9 is a sectional view taken substantially along a section line IX-IX shown in FIG. 8.

FIG. 10 is a sectional view taken substantially along a section line X-X' in FIG. 7.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring now to the accompanying drawings, several preferred embodiments of the invention will be described in detail.

In FIGS. 1-5, numeral 1 represents coventional pillar plate of the watch movement shown, the main operating parts of the multi-point alarm mechanism according to this invention being mounted on the plate 1, as will become more clear as the description proceeds.

Numeral 2 represents a conventional hour wheel which carries at its top an hour hand 2a attached fixedly thereto. 3 represents an alarm switch disc made of an insulating material, preferably synthetic resin, arranged concentrically with the hour wheel and fixedly attached thereto by press fit or the like conventional fixing means, thus being rotatable a complete revolution per twelve hours. The disc 3 comprises a conductive concentric ring layer 3a, deposited on the lower surface of said disc 3, formed preferably relying on the conventional printing circuit technique. Further, the disc 3 is formed with a radially extending conducting strip layer 3b extending on the upper surface thereof substantially from the vertically opposite point to the said ring layer 3a, to the outer periphery of thedisc 3.

A conducting pin 3d embedded in the disc 3 serves for Y establishing an electrical connection between the both layers 3a and 3b. The radial strip layer 3b is positioned, so as to keep vertical registration with the hour hand 2a, as may be easily supposed from FIG. 1.

A resilient contact 4 .is kept at its free end in sliding contact with the conductive ring layer 30,, While its root end is fixedly attached through an insulating washer 4b to the pillar plate 1 by a positioning pin or rivet 4a made of an insulating material.

In close proximity to the tip end of the conductive strip layer 3b, a peripheral notch 3c is formed 'on the disc 3, the purpose of which will become clearer as the description proceeds.

A preset ring 5 is fixedly attached through the itermediary of an intermediate ring 30 to the pillar plate 1 by means of three rivets, only one of which is shown at 5b in FIGS. 1 and 2. In practice, the fixing rivet 5b can not appear in FIG. 2. However, this sectional figure has been somewhat modified to show such rivet. As will be more fully described, this modification is applied to the demonstration of further several constituent parts. The

preset ring 5 comprises a ring proper 5d and 72 resilient contact arms 5a substantially inwardly extending therefrom. Each of the elongated resilient contact arms 5a is formed with a more closely centerly directing crooked end part 50 which may be differently colored from the main part 5a of the contact arm for clear identification. These centrally directing contact parts 5c are kept normally at a small distance from the bottom peripheral surface of the disc 3, but they can pass forcibly over the peripheral surface of said disc 3 and brought into pressure contact with the upper surface of the same disc, upon being subjected to an upwardly directing drive force exerted from below by an urging spring pawl 6a, as will be more fully described hereinafter.

The spring pawl 6a is fixedly attached at its root end to a holder ring 6 which is formed at its lower surface with a series of gear teeth 6b along its closed overall length. The holder ring 6 is rotatably mounted on the pillar plate 1 which is formed for this purpose with a corresponding ring groove, although not specifically shown only for simplicity of the drawing. The intermediate ring 30 covers partially the holder ring 6 which is thus positively prevented from disengagement with the receiving ring groove on the pillar plate.

A set ring 7, specifically shown in FIG. 4, is formed with three puched-out tongues 7a and mounted rotatably and directly upon the pillar plate 1, although there is shown intentionally a small gap therebetween in FIG. 5 for avoiding occasional confusion. As seen from FIG. 5, each of the downwardly inclined tongues 7a projects into a recess 1a formed on the pillar plate and extending a short distance in radial direction relative to the center of the ring 7, and thus, relative to the center of the timepiece. The tongue 7a is kept in slidable contact with one of the uppermost edges of the side walls of the related recess 1a. As seen from FIG. 4, a motionreceiving pin 7b depends rigidly from said ring 7 and is kept in slidable contact with an elongated slot 8a of a bell crank lever 8 which is pivotably mounted on the pillar plate 1 by means of a studded pivot pin 8b.

A motion-transmitting arbor 10 is axially slidably and rotatably mounted in and through a circular opening 1b formed through a part of the pillar plate 1, as shown in FIGS. 2 and 3. The main part of the arbor 10 consists of a square-sectioned part 1011, a rigid inner extension thereof being formed into a circular sectioned arbor end 10b, as most clearly seen from FIG. 4. The inner most extremity of the arbor. end 10b is normally kept in pressure engagement with the opposite end of the bell crank lever 8.

A setting position selector ring 9 is rotatably mounted on an inner ring shoulder 11a formed on a case center body 11 of the watch. This ring 9 is provided on its upper surface with an indicator mark 9a, FIG. 1, which is in radial registration with spring pawl 6a, and on its rear surface with a series of gear teeth 9b made integral therewith.

A manually settable crown 12 is made integral with a stem 12a which passes through a radial bore 11b of the case central body 11 and is rigidly connected with the outer enlarged end of said motion-transmitting arbor 10 by a tongue-andgroove coupling shown at 12.

Between the crown l2 and the case center body 11, there is provided a return coil spring 13 which is inserted in position under precompression so that the crown is kept normally at its regular outermost position shown in FIG. 2.

Pinions 14 and 15 are mounted on the squaresectioned part 10a of the arbor 10, thus being rotatable in unison therewith. The smaller pinion l4 meshes with gear teeth 6b, and the larger pinion l5 meshes with gear teeth 9b.

The ratio of the distances from the center of the watch movement to the pinions l4 and 15, respectively, is selected equal to the ratio of the radii of these pinions. By turning the crown 12, these pinions can be rotated in phase with each other.

Stationary spring contact 4 is connected through lead 26 with an acoustic signalling device, preferably a buzzer 16, thence through lead 27 with a power source 17 which is further connected through lead 28 to preset ring 5. This electric connection mode is shown in a rather schematic way.

A conventional time display dial [8 is fixedly mounted on the pillar plate 1 by means of a plurality of short pillars, only one of which is shown at 18b-in FIGS. 2 and 3.

The dial 18 is provided with a transparent window which takes the form of a concentric ring when seen in FIG. 1, although not, specifically shown for avoiding confusion of the drawing. Through this window 18a, part of the tip ends 5c of the resilient contact arms 5a, as well as the outer peripheral zone of disc 3 are visible from the upper face of the watch, for visual inspection of preset member(s) of the contact arms 5a.

Stop ring 19 adapted for suppressing occasional upward disengagement of the selector ring 9 from position, is provided between a conventional crystal glass 20 and the case center body 11 of the watch and kept in position by being tightly squeezed therebetweemas most clearly shown in FIG. 2.

Numeral 21 represents a conventional time-setting or winding crown.

The operation of the alarm mechanism according to the first embodiment is as follows.

When it is desired to preset the mechanism for alarming at several preferred time points, the presetting crown 12 is manually rotated in clockwise direction when seen from righthand side of FIGS. l-3, motion is therefore transmitted from the crown through its stem 12a, the arbor l0, pinions 14; 15, and gear teeth 6b; 9b to holder ring 6 and selector ring 9, respectively. Thus, these rings 6 and 9 are rotated in unison with each other, as was referred to hereinbefore. The manual turning operation'by means of the crown 12 is ceased when the indicator mark 9a is brought into registration with a certain first selected alarm time, for instance, 6 30, which time point can be determined by consultation with the regular time-indicating gradation or a spe cially provided similar means appearing on the upper surface of the dial 18, although not shown. Spring pawl 6a is also brought to the thus selected presetting position. The foregoing manipulation is carried out with the crown 12 positioned at its regular position shown in FIGS. 1 and 2.

Then, the crown 12 is pushed-in from the position in FIG. 2 to that shown in FIG. 3. Axial inward motion is transmitted from the crown through its stem 10 to bell crank lever 8, thereby the latter being correspondingly rotated counter clockwise in FIG. 4 and thus the set ring 7 being rotated correspondingly counter clockwise, as hinted by small arrows A and B, respectively. By this turning movement of preset ring 7, the latter is elevated in its position a small vertical distance from the full line position to its chain-dotted line position shown in FIG. 5, by virtue of the inclinedly sliding contact of the tongues 7a with the angular edges of the respective recesses 1a..This raised position of preset ring 7 is also shown in FIG. 3 and in full line. With this vertical movement of preset ring 7, the spring pawl 6a will be pushed up at its resilient inner end portion.

By resilient upward movement of the spring pawl 6a, one of the resilient arms 5a which is positioned just above the latter is caused to be flexed forcibly and resiliently with its tip end, thus transferring now from below of the periphery to the upper peripheral edge portion of alarm switch disc 3. This positional transfer operation of the selected-out one of spring contact arms 5a can be easily understood by comparison between FIGS. 2 and 3. In FIG. 3, the thus flexed-up contact arm is shown in full line, while the regularly occupying lower position thereof is shown in chain-dotted line for better comparison and understanding.

In this way, the selected-out spring contact has been preset to a desired alarming time point, and continues to occupy such preset and memorial position until the preset will. be released directly upon the issuance of acoustic alarm signal, as later'set forth hereinafter. The crooked end portion 5c of the thus preset one of the resilient contact arms 5a can be seen through the transparent window 18a.

Upon completion of the aforementioned first presetting operation, the operator releases his finger pressure applied to the crown 12. Then, the crown 12 and its related parts 12a, and are returned from their advanced position shown in FIG. 3 to their receded position shown in FIG. 2, under the influence of the return spring 13. Set ring 7 and bell crank lever 8 are returned at the same time to theposition shown in FIG. 2, under the influence of the accumulated spring energy at 6a. The spring pawl 6a is also returned to its original regular position shown in FIG. 2 by release of its accumulated energy in the aforementioned way.

When it is desired to preset a second time point, such as 8:40, the crown 12 is turned until the indicator mark 9a carried on selector ring 9 is brought to the above specified time point and then, the same crown is pushed in, so as to bring a correspondingly preselected second one of the resilient contact arms 5a into its preset and memorial position overlying the disc 3, and so on. v

I If the operator should have a desire to preset an intermediate alarm time point, such as 7:10'in the present preferred embodiment, and indeed, upon completion of a plurality of presetting operations, his desire can also be satisfied. In this case, such intermediate presetting can be performed at any preset or non-preset position of the selector ring 9 by turning and pushing-in the crown 12 in the aforementioned way. For this purpose, the selector ring 9 can be turned without hindrance in one or another rotational direction. It will be also seen from the foregoing description that a kind of multi-time point presetting job can be performed and that the once preselected time points can be preserved mainly by the aforementioned unique combination of alarm switch disc 3 with preset ring 5 which combination provides a unique multi-time point memory.

The alarming operation is carried out in the following way.

As in the conventional watch, the hour wheel 2 performs a complete revolution per 12 hours by receiving drive torque from the conventional gear train, not shown, of the watch movement. Hour wheel 2, hour hand 2a and alarm switch disc 3-rotate in unison with each other.

When time elapses and the preset first and earliest time point, 6:30 in this specific example, comes, the conducting strip layer 3b on alarm switch disc 3, as the latter rotates in unison with hour hand 2a, is brought into contact with the firstly preselected and memoried one of contact arms 5a, an electric cercuit including power source 17, lead 27, buzzer 16, shown only schematically, lead 26, resilient contact 4 ring layer 3a, strip layer 3b, the firstly preset contact arm 5a, ring proper 5d and lead 28 which is directly connected to the negative side of the power source is established, thereby the buzzer 16 being energized to deliver acoustic alarm signal. Naturally, the lead 28 may be replaced by the pillar plate 1 when necessary.

Although not specifically shown, the buzzer is such conventional design that it comprises a piezoelectric vibrator lead, switching transistor means and timelimiting RC-elements for controlling the energizing period of the buzzer. In practice, the energizing period is preferably limited to 5 seconds or so. Therefore, lapse of the energizing period for about 5 seconds, in this specific case, as counted from the establishment of the buzzer energizing circuit, the delivery of the acoustic alarm signal will be terminated.

With further continuation of the rotating movement of alarm switch disc 3, say for 10 minutes, notch 30 is brought into registration with the firstly preselected contact arm 5a, thus the latter being automatically reset to its regularly occupying lower position by its own resiliency energy accumulated during the foregoing presetting operation.

When the next preset alarming time point, 7:10 in this specific case, the same procedures are brought about, so as to deliver acoustic alarm signal and then to reset the secondly preset contact arm 5 a, and so on.

Next, referring to FIGS. 6 and 7, a second embodiment of the invention will be described hereinbelow in detail.

The construction and operation of the present embodiment is substantially similar to those of the foregoing embodiment and thus, respective samegor similar parts are denoted with same reference numerals regardless of minor occasional differences in their design and function, yet each being added with for easy comparison and better understanding of the invention.

In the present embodiment, the foregoing spring contact 4 has been transformed into that of an elongated straight spring arm 104 which is formed at its root end with a mounting metallic plate 104c rigidly attached to a part 122 of a base member, not shown, by means of a positioning pin 104a and a fixing screw l04b as shown.

Pillar plate. 101 is formed with a slightly elongated opening 1010. The base member 122 is, although not specifically shown, made of an insulating material, such as epoxy resin, and adapted for mountingthereon several elements of the buzzer drive circuit and attached on the bottom surface of pillar plate 1. As may be well supposed, the said part 122 of the base member appears as protruding through said opening 1010 from below of the pillar plate. The tip end of the resilient contact 104 is kept in permanent contact with the concentric contact ring 103a which may be a metal ring in place of the foregoing conductive layer 3a.

The mounting plate 104 and metallic fixing screw 104b serve as substantial part of the foregoing lead 26, and connected through a short conductor, not shown, to the buzzer 16.

' This modified connection arrangement including the parts 104, 1040 and 104b can provide a more reliable electrical connection than that employed in the foregoing first embodiment.

In the present embodiment, the foregoing strip layer 3b has been replaced by an elongated and pointed metallic piece 1031') which is snugly received and fixedly positioned in a correspondingly shaped recess 103s on alarm switch disc 103. At the inner end of the contact piece 103b, the latter is provided fixedly with a conducting pin 103d which corresponds to that shown at 3d in FIG. 2 and is thus kept in permanent electrical contact with the concentrically arranged conductive ring 103a. In close proximity to the pointed outer end of the contact piece 103b, there is provided a reset notch 103C corresponding to that shown at 30 in the foregoing first embodiment for the same purpose.

By adopting the modified contact arrangement, a more reliable and rigid electrical connection may be assured in comparison with the corresponding foregoing one.

In the present embodiment, the foregoing, peripherally and downwardly projecting tongues 7a have been replaced by a corresponding number of inwardly and downwardly projecting puched-out one, having a substantially triangular shape, as shown at 107a in FIG. 7. Each of these tongues 107a is so designed and arranged to cooperate with a round opening 101a drilled through the pillar plate 101. The necessary up-and-down movement of the set ring 107 can be assured by the sliding cooperation of the triangular tongues 107a with the respective round openings 101a.

This modification has been adopted for the purpose of reduction of the space requirement, and further, for replacing a rather difficult provision of the recesses In by the more easily workable round openings 101a.

In the present modified embodiment, the holder ring 106 is formed with a series of peripheral teeth 106d which is cooperable with a jumper spring 128 of conventional design for allowing the ring 106 to performa stepping rotation. The jumper spring 128, only schematically shown by chain-dotted lines, is fixedly mounted on the pillar plate 101, although not shown.

The purpose of the provision of this jumper feed mechanism resides in the avoidance of such occasional fear that with use of the first embodiment, spring pawl 6a may be stopped at an intermediate point between two neighboring contact arms a which are spaced in the present specific case at a peripheral distance corresponding to 10 minutes in terms of the time display. If such intermediate positioning of the spring pawl 6a or 106a should occur, a push-in operation of the presetting crown 12 or 112 would not invite the desired preset. By adopting the stepping feed of holder ring 106, the aforementioned fear of the malpresetting can be avoided completely.

In this modified embodiment, the spring pawl (in having a relatively short length and a straight radial shape has been replaced by a substantially elongated and curved spring strip 106a which is substantially displaced from the truely radial direction. At the tip end of this spring strip 106a a push-up pin 106b, made of an insulating material, is rigidly attached.

The purpose of adoption of this modification is to provide an ample presetting stroke, as well as to insure a reliable electrical insulation of resilient arm contacts a from the watch movement parts which serve frequently earth conductors for electronic drive of the movement. a

In the present modified embodiment, several spring strips 125 are provided which are fixedly attached at their root ends to the holder ring 106, while the tip ends of these spring strips are' kept in pressure engagement the preset ring 105 by meansof several set screws 124.

This modification serves for providing a better insulation of the resilient contact arms 105a from the constituent parts of the movement for the same reasons as above referred to.

Further in the present embodiment, pinions 114 and 115 corresponding to those which have been denoted with 14 and 15, respectively, in the foregoing first embodiment, are made integral with each other through the intermediary of an intermediate sleeve 126 having a square sectioned axial bore, although not shown, for reception of the intermediate square stem part, not shown, which corresponds, however, to the stem part 10a in the foregoing first embodiment. This modification serves for assuring more reliably the synchronous rotation of the both pinions 114 and 115 than in the case of the foregoing embodiment.

In the present modified embodiment, the coil spring 13 in the foregoing embodiment has been replaced by an elongated curved spring strip 113 the root end of which is rigidly attached to the pillar plate 101 by means of fixing rivets 127 while the tip end of said spring strip is provided rigidly with a pin 113a kept in engagement with the forked end of the longer arm of a bell crank lever 108. This lever 108 is pivotably mounted by means of pivot pin l08b on the pillar plate 101. The lower end of the pin 113a is kept in engagement with a ring groove c defined between and by the two disc flanges 110a and ll0b formed rigidly on the inner round end part of the stem 110, as most clearly seen from FIG. 6. The shorter arm of bell crank lever 108 is also formed into a forked end which is kept in engagement with a pin 1071) depending rigidly from set ring 107, said forked end being supported slidably on the upper surface of the pillar plate 101, as most clearly seen from FIG. 10. The bell crank lever 108 corresponds naturally to that shown at 8 in the-first emtor ring made integral with the spring contact arms 205a is shown only partially at 205. Each contact arm 205a is formed with a crooked end part as before, yet denoted with 2050. The contact arm 205a is formed with a branch arm 205e which is arranged substantially parallel to the main part of the resilient contact arm 205a, the outer free end part 20 5f of said branch arm 205e being interrupted from connection with the main ring part 205d of the ring 205. As seen from FIG. 9, the part 205e extends inclinedly upwards from the level of the main part 205a, while the part 205f extends substantially parallel to said main part 205a, as well as the dial plate 218 provided with the transparent window 218a made of a mat glass. With the contact arm 205a positioned at regular off-service position as shown in full line'in FIG. 9, the part 205f extends parallel to the bottom surface of said window and at a close level thereto. The upper surface of the part 205f can preferably be colored in red for clear and sharp identification when viewing through window 2180 from upper.

When the contact arm 205a has been preset in the aforementioned way, it will occupy the chain-dotted line position wherein the demonstrating part 205f of branch arm 205e will recede from the closer position to the mat glass window 218a, thus the part 205f being unable to see through the window. In this way, the preset position can be easily and clearly identified.

If necessary, the side elevational configuration of the branch arm 205e can be so shaped that when the contact arm is preset, the display part is brought to its closer position to the window. In this modification, not shown, the display mode is naturally reversed from the foregoing.

It should be noted that the same or similar parts of the present modification from the foregoing embodiment, same respective reference numeral has been used, each being, however, added with 200 to that shown and described in the first embodiment, for quicker identification and easier comparisonf'lhus, it will be seen that the window 218a takes a concentric ring relative to the dial 218 and the watch movement.

The embodiments of the invention in which an exclusive property or privilege is claimed are as follows:

1. An alarm timepiece, comprising a timepiece movement, a switching mechanism operatively connected with said timepiece movement, a setting means for presetting said mechanism to a plurality of alarm time points and an alarm mechanism adapted for being controlled in its operation by said switching mechanism, the latter being characterized by that said switching mechanism comprises a number of substantially inwardly extending spring contact arms carried by a pre' selector ring, a rotatable switch disc carrying a switch contact and driven from said timepiece movement in unison with the hour hand thereof, each presetting being brought about by transferring a selected one of said contact arms from one side to another side of said disc and when each of the preselected alarm time points arrives, said switch contact and the related one of the preselected contact arms are brought into engagement with each other for energization of said alarm mechanism.

2. Alarm timepiece as set forth in claim 1, wherein said preselector ring is a stationary member which is mounted on the pillar plate of said movement.

3. Alarm timepiece as set forth in claim 1, character ized by that in close to said contact arms, a concentric transparent or semi-transparent viewing window is provided, preferably on the dial. plate of the timepiece movement.

4. Alarm timepiece as set forth in claim 1 wherein a multi-point of mechanical memory is provided by the combination of said preselector ring and said switch disc.

5. Alarm timepiece as set forth in claim 1 wherein each of said contact arms isformed with a radially and inwardly directing contacting end portion.

6. Alarm timepiece as set forth in claim 1, wherein said contact arm is formed with'a branch arm directing substantially parallel to the 'main part of said arm for demonstrating difference between the preset and nonpreset position of said arm.

7. Alarm timepiece asset forth in claim 6, wherein said branch arm is brought nearer to or more remote from said window for showing its preset position therethrough.

8. Alarm timepiece as set forth in claim I wherein said setting means comprises a set ring movable upand-down relative to the pillar plate of the timepiece, and an actuating member adapted for follow after the up-and-down position of said set ring for presetting the contact arm.

9. Alarm timepiece as set forth in claim 8, further comprising a holder ring carrying said actuating memher, and an outer manipulatable member, preferably a settable crown, a selector ring and said holder ring rotatable in .unison with each other by manipulation of said manipulatable member.

10. Alarm timepiece as set forth in claim 9, wherein said set ring is formed with v a plurality of tongues adapted for cooperation with respective recesses or openings for alteration of its upand-down position.

11. Alarm timepiece as set forth in claim 10, wherein said set ring is partially rotatable and movable in the axial direction thereof by push-in operation of said manipulatable member.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3832843 *Feb 20, 1974Sep 3, 1974Timex CorpElectric alarm timepiece
US3910034 *Apr 4, 1975Oct 7, 1975Timex CorpAlarm device for a wristwatch external to the movement
US4069658 *Dec 20, 1976Jan 24, 1978Rhythm Watch Co. Ltd.Alarm setting device for timepieces
US4121414 *Dec 23, 1976Oct 24, 1978Kabushiki Kaisha SeikoshaAlarm timepiece
US4422775 *Sep 22, 1982Dec 27, 1983Eta Sa, Fabriques D'ebauchesDevice for controlling the functions of a watch and for displaying the state of at least one of the controlled functions
US4504154 *Dec 23, 1982Mar 12, 1985Dieter Graesslin FeinwerktechnikIndexing element for switching a chronometer
US5003519 *May 25, 1989Mar 26, 1991Eta S.A. Fabriques D'ebauchesAlarm arrangement for a timepiece
US5168476 *May 8, 1992Dec 1, 1992Junghans Uhren GmbhAlarm clock
DE2904744A1 *Feb 8, 1979Aug 14, 1980Junghans Gmbh GebElektrische zeigeruhr
Classifications
U.S. Classification368/74, 368/238, 968/597
International ClassificationG04C21/30, G04C21/00
Cooperative ClassificationG04C21/30
European ClassificationG04C21/30