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Publication numberUS3783649 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 8, 1974
Filing dateSep 27, 1972
Priority dateOct 7, 1971
Also published asDE2248987A1
Publication numberUS 3783649 A, US 3783649A, US-A-3783649, US3783649 A, US3783649A
InventorsAdachi K, Iwasa T, Nakamura H, Sato H, Yamamoto K
Original AssigneeAsahi Chemical Ind
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for continuously treating fibrous materials under pressure
US 3783649 A
Abstract
Fibrous materials are continuously heat-treated under pressure by passage through a heat-treating chamber filled with a pressurized heating fluid and provided with at least a pair of symmetrical sealing chambers which are located at the inlet part and the outlet part of the heat-treating chamber. Sealing fluid is introduced into the sealing chambers through pipes for introducing the sealing fluid; and ejected from the clearances A and A' toward the outside of the heat-treating chamber, while applying a static pressure to the atmosphere around the fibrous materials passing through the slits formed in the central part of the inlet and outlet of the heat-treating chamber. Leakage of the pressurized heating fluid from the heat-treating chamber can be thereby prevented, and the fibrous materials can be heat-treated without any damages.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1191 Yamamoto et al.

[ APPARATUS FOR CONTINUOUSLY TREATING FIBROUS MATERIALS UNDER PRESSURE [75] Inventors: Katsuo Yamamoto; Hideo Sato;

Toshio Iwasa; Ilisao Nakamura, all of Fujishi; Katsuhiro Adachi, Moriyamashi, all of Japan [73] Assignee: Asahi Kasei Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha, Osaka, Japan 22 Filed: Sept. 27, 1972 21] Appl. No.: 292,500

[30] Foreign Application Priority Data 1451 Jan. 8, 1974 3,475,034 10/1969 Hayashim/ 68/5 E X Primary ExaminerPeter Feldman fiqnt .Qeqmi H fiP 1R C s,

zfibfney-Armstrong & Wegner 57 ABSTRACT Fibrous materials are continuously heat-treated under pressure by passage through a heat-treating chamber filled with a pressurized heating fluid and provided with at least a pair of symmetrical sealing chambers which are located at the inlet part and the outlet part of the heat-treating chamber. Sealing fluid is introduced into the sealing chambers through pipes for in-: troducing the sealing fluid; and ejected from the clearances A and A toward the outside of the heat-treating chamber, while applying a static pressure to the atmosphere around the fibrous materials passing through the slits formed in the central part of the inlet and outlet of the heat-treating chamber. Leakage of the pressurized heating fluid from the heat-treating chamber can bethereby prevented, and the fibrous materials can be heat-treated without any damages.

I 3 Claims, 7 Drawing'Figures' WIENTED 3,783 9649 SHEET 2 0F 3 PAIENTED JAN 8 974 SHEET 3 OF 3 FEGQSb APPARATUS FOR CONTINUOUSLY TREATING FIBROUS MATERIALS UNDER PRESSURE DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to an apparatus for continuously heat-treating various fibrous materials such as tows, slivers, filaments, strand-like fiber bundles or fabric products such as knittings, etc. in a pressurized fluid thereby to give desired physical properties or characteristics to said fibrous materials or to treat said fibrous materials. More particularly, the present invention relates to an apparatus for continuously heat-treating the fibrous materials under pressure in a heating fluid such as heating steam above atmospheric pressure, or various vapors or gases above atmospheric pressure, or various treating liquids in a pressurized state above atmospheric pressure, or the like to improve the quality of the fibrous materials.

It is well known that generally, when fibers, particularly, chemical fibers, are subjected to heat-treatment such as stretching, relaxation, annealing, etc., orientationof molecular structures of the fibers is improved, or interior strain is relaxed, and consequently, the qualities of the fibers are improved, forexample, a tenacity is increased; elongation is reduced; Youngs modulus is increased; shrinkage is reduced and stabilized as well as made uniform; dyestuff absorptivity is improved and stabilized as well as made uniform; attrition resistance is increased; fixation of crimpings is made permanent; etc. Particularly when heat-treatment such as heatstretching, annealing, etc. is carried out in a pressurized, saturated steam, fibers having a high Youngs modulus and a low elongation can be obtained. Further, heat-treatment includes various flnishings and processings such as dyeing, scouring, bleaching, etc. in addition to the above-mentioned physical processings, and even the heat-treatment based on said chemical processings, it is necessary to bring the pressure into an elevated state above atmospheric pressure, as in the dyeing of polyester products. When the fibrous materials are heat-treated in a fluid of heating medium such as saturated steam or various gases or liquids in that manner, it is often necessary to bring the pressure of heating fluid to a pressurized state above atmospheric pressure, to obtain a desired heat-treating temperature or heat-treating effect. For example, in case of saturated steam, the pressure exceeds one atmosphere in a heat-treating chamber, when-more than 100C is required. Therefore, there is no problem relating to apparatus when the heat-treatment is carried out batchwise, for example, by means of an autoclave, etc., but, in an apparatus for continuously heat-treating fibrous materials by passing them through a pressurized fluid, it is necessary to cause a smooth passage of the fibrous materials through the inlet partand theoutlet part for the fibrous materialsfand further not to allow the pressure in the treating chamber to leak out of the inlet thereof. and the outlet part The object of the present invention is to provide an apparatus for continuously heat-treating fibrous materials under pressure in a commercially and economically effective manner thereby to improve the qualities of the fibrous materials.

Heretofore, various apparatuses have been proposed for continuously heat-treating various fibrous materials in a pressurized steam (Kasen Geppo, September issue, pages 59 71, 1970). For example, the well-known labyrinth system is poor in its sealing effect, and the leakage of pressurized fluid is large and consequently such a system is economically disadvantageous. The most widely used roller-sealing system has a serious problem in the durability of the roller material, and a high speed continuous operation is difficult at a high temperature under a high pressure. Furthermore, since the roller itself constitutes a part of the sealing mechanism, there often takes place great difficulty in winding of the fibrous materials around the roller.

Further, the lip sealing system is not satisfactory in relation to the durability of the material, and the fibrous materials are frequently damaged by the friction at the sealing part.

The cascade sealing system is also expensive due to a consumption or fouling of a liquid when a liquid of high specific gravity is used. When the sealing is effected by water cascade, the apparatus becomes disadvantageously large. According to a nozzle sealingsystem proposed in Japanese Patent Publication No. 19635/63, fibrous materials must be introduced into or withdrawn from the apparatus through a large number of nozzles, and consequently it is hard to evade the damage to fibrous materials.

The systems so far proposed have arious disadvantages in damaging of the fibrous materials, leakage of pressurized fluid, durability of materials, treating velocity, etc.

On the other hand, various proposals have been made for a fluid sealing system most similar to the present invention (Japanese Patent Publication No. 5356/69, Japanese Utility model publication No. 28388/63), but sealing fluid is often leaked into the heat-treating chamber, and mixed. Furthermore, their sealing effect is usually lower than that of other systems.

The present apparatus is an improved apparatus for continuously heat-treating various fibrous materials under pressure, whereby said various disadvantages can be overcome. According to the present apparatus, a pair of linear nozzles are symmertrically provided at an inlet part and an outlet part for the fibrous materials at both the ends of the heat-treating chamber under pressure, so that the linear nozzles may pinch the fibrous materials; a sufficient clearance is given for-passage of the fibrous materials between said nozzles; the fibrous materials are passed through the clearance thus formed, and at the same time, a sealing fluid is ejected from said nozzles, and a leakage of the heating fluid from the heat-treating chamber under pressure to the outside can be prevented by a pinching pressure due to the static pressure of the sealing fluid; the ejected sealing fluid is pushed to the outside from. the heat-treating chamber by an internal pressure in the heat-treating chamber under pressure, anddischarg'edto the outside without any leakage into the heat-treating chamber which 'is under pressure. The fibrous materials can be rials under pressure, and its relation to accessory devices.

FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional, detailed view of a sealing chamber.

FIG. 3 is a right side view of FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is a schematic conceptual view of the sealing chamber.

FIGS. 5a, 5b and 5c are schematic views of other em bodiments than that of FIG. 1 in respect of sealing chambers.

In FIG. 1 is shown an apparatus for continuously heat-treating fibrous materials under pressure using a heated medium such as heated steam or various heating vapors or gases above atmospheric pressure, and the apparatus consists of a drum or shell in the form of pipe 1, a heat-treating chamber 2, sealing chambers 3 and 3, and an overflow chamber 4 for the sealing fluid. The sealing chambers 3 and 3', and the overflow chamber 4 for the sealing fluid are symmetrically placed at the inlet part and the outlet part of the drum 1. Fibrous materials 19 to be treated are passed from feeding rollers 17 through a guide opening 8, a clearance B between sealing plates 6 and 6' and a clearance B between lips 20 and 20' of sealing chambers 3 and 3, as shown in detail in FIG. 2, and heat-treated in the heat-treating chamber 2. Then, the fibrous materials are passed through the outlet part of the drum 1 provided with clearances and a guide opening of the same structure as those at the inlet part, and led to another step through withdrawing rollers 18. A heating medium enters the heat-treating chamber 2 through a pipe for introducing the heating medium at the bottom side of the chamber, and a sealing fluid enters the sealing chambers 3 and 3' through pipes 9 and 9 for introducing the sealing fluid by a fluid-feeding pump 16 (or a blower in the case of the sealing fluid being a gas). The sealing fluid is ejected from clearances A and A between the sealing plates 6 and 6 and the lips 20 and 20, as shown in detail in FIG. 2, and serves to sea] by a pinching pressure due to a static pressure of the sealing fluid symmetrically ejected at a high speed. After the ejection, the sealing fluid is discharged from the overflow chamber 4 under atmospheric pressure to the outside through a discharge pipe 10 by the internal pressure of the heat-treating chamber.

Details of the sealing structure of the present invention are illustrated in FIGS. 2, 3 and 4, where numerals 9 and 9 show the pipes for introducing the sealing fluid; numeral 1 shows the drum; numeral 5 shows a kind of blank flange provided at the center part with the lips 20 and 20' having a clearance B sufficient for passing the fibrous materials, particularly as shown in FIG. 3; numerals 6 and 6 show a pair of sealing plates, each traversing halfway the drum 1 in a symmetrically inclined manner. A special structure of the sealing chamber 3 consisting of three members, that is, the drum 1, the blank flange 5 and the sealing plate 6 is a portion of an inclinedly cut-away cylinder, enclosed by a bold line in FIG. 4. The traversing of the two sealing plates is so arranged as to make the cross line of the sealing plates 6 and 6 fall on a center line XOY of the drum 1, and further there is a clearance B sufficient for passing the fibrous materials across the cross line of the sealing plates 6 and 6'. The clearances B and B may have equal or different widths. The lips 20 and 20 are provided for forming clearances A and A for ejecting the sealing fluid, and have a function for adjusting the lengths and widths of the clearances A and B and at the same time the angles 0 and 0' between the blank flange 5 and the sealing plates 6 and 6'. Of course, the form of the lip is not restricted to those shown in FIGS. 2 and 3.

Explanation will be made in more detail, referring to FIG. 4. Clearances A and A have an angle formed by POQ along the direction OP of a face XPYO of the sealing plate 6, and clearances B and B pass through a cross line XOY of the sealing plates 6 and 6'. Of course, the sealing chamber 3 formed by the sealing plate 6' is in a position symmetrical to the sealing chamber 3.

The clearances A and A thus formed constitute a linear nozzle, and the sealing fluid can be ejected at a high speed from the nozzles A and A by narrowing the widths of the clearances A and A. Suppose the ejection speed of. the sealing fluid is V m/see; the specific gravity of the sealing fluid, 'ykg/m and the standard acceleration of the gravity, g m/sec a static pressure, P, kglcm of the fluid ejected at a high speed is given by the following formula:

By balancing a pinching pressure of the sealing fluid having the static pressure, P, kglcm which acts symmetrically, against the intemal pressure in the heattreating chamber, the sealing can be attained, and the leakage of the pressurized fluid can be prevented.

The widths of the clearances A and A depend upon the amount of the sealing fluid, opening areas of A and A, and the necessary sealing pressure. The clearance B between the sealing plates 6 and 6', and the clearance B of the blank flange 5 musthave such widths and distances that the fibrous materials may not be damaged by the friction, but there takes place a leakage of the internal pressure, if the clearances are too large. That is, these clearances depend upon the sizes of the fibrous materials to be treated. In FIG. 1, the directions of the sealing plates 6 and 6 are made symmetrical so that the clearances A and A may be directed towards the heat-treating chamber 2. It is also possible to make the direction in such a way that the clearances A and A may be directed symmetrically towards the outside of the heat treating chamber 2, or in parallel in the same direction, depending on heat-treatment. For example, see FIGS. 5a, 5b and 5c of the accompanying drawings. The angles 0 and 0' between the sealing plates 6 and 6' and the blank flange 5 must not be more than to attain a good sealing efiect based on the pinching pressure of the sealing fluid and discharge the sealing fluid from the heat-treating chamber to the outside. If the angles are more than 60, the pinching pressure of the sealing fluid is lowered, and the sealing fluid is liable to enter into the heat-treating chamber 2. This is not preferable, Of course, these angles 6 and 6' must be equal to keep a better balance of the pinching pressure. As additional devices, there is provided type of another blank flange 7 having the guide opening 8 for passing the fibrous materials, whereby an overflow chamber 4 is formed. The guide opening 8 is an inlet or outlet for the fibrous materials, but has an effect upon adjustment of the width and thickness of the fibrous materials. When the sealing fluid is a cheap one such as air, the fluid is fed by a blower. In such a case, there is no need of recovery and recycle of it. However, a liquid having a high specific gravity usually has a good sealing effect, and particularly water is commercially advantageous, and its recyclic use is more economical. The overflow chamber 4 is a compartment for collecting the fluid ejected through the clearances A and A'and owing to the restricted angles of ejection of the sealing fluid, the sealing fluid enters into the overflow chamber 4 outside the heat-treating chamber 2 from the sealing chambers 3 and 3 and never enters into the heat-treating chamber 2. A discharge pipe for the sealing fluid is connected to a storage tank 11 from the overflow chamber 4, and the sealing fluid is led to the pipes 9 and 9 for introducing the sealing fluid from the storage tank 11 by a circulation pump 16. The storage tank 11 can be under the atmospheric pressure, and if necessary can be provided with a heater 12, a pipe 13 for making'up the sealing fluid, and a vent pipe 14. Of course, a pair of the sealing chambers 3 and 3 can be provided symmetrically at a plurality of stages at the inlet part and the outlet part. In this case, better recovery can be attained by making a part of the discharge pipes an ejector type.

According to the present apparatus, it is possible to carry out the heat-treatment either in a tension state or relaxed state of the'fibrous materials. That is, in the case of heat-treatment under tension, it is possible to select any stretching ratio by making the speeds of the feeding rollers 17 and the withdrawing rollers 18 equal or making the speed of the withdrawing rollers 18 higher. In the case of heat-treatment in a relaxed state, the speed of the withdrawing rollers 18 is made lower than the speed of the feeding rollers 17. The present apparatus is also characterized by almost complete lack of difficulties and almost permanent durability, be cause the apparatus has in itself no wearing portions as in roller seals or lip seals. A further great feature of the present invention is that the sealing fluid never enters into the heat-treating chamber on account of the restricted angles of ejection of the nozzles, and is dis charged under the atmospheric pressure to the outside from the heat-treating chamber, and further can be recovered and recycled. Since there is no mixing of the pressurized heating fluid and the sealing fluid, it is possible to use different kinds of fluids. Even if the pressurized heating fluid is toxic or at a high temperature, it can be discharged from the overflow chamber 4 through the discharge pipe 10 and further recovered therethrough, and thus the present apparatus is quite distinguished in safety and sanitary protection. Furthermore, since the sealing fluid is recovered and recyled under the atmospheric pressure, the storage tank 11 may not be of a pressure-resistant construction. According to the present apparatus, a sealing can be attained by making the pinching pressure due to the static pressure of the sealing fluid-equal to the pressure of the heating medium in the heat-treating chamber. Of course, it is also possible to use a plurality of the sealing stages thereby to reduce the pinching pressure of the respective seals.

As described above, the present apparatus has such advantages that various fibrous materials can be continuously heat-treated at a high speed without any leakage of the pressurized heating medium from the heattreating chamber to the outside and any damage to the fibrous materials, based on quite novel principle.

What is claimed is:

'1. An apparatus for continuously heat-treating fi-v brous materials in a heat-treating chamber filled with a pressurized heating fluid, which comprises:

A. a drum-type heat treating chamber having a feeding and discharge part;

B. a blank flange fixed to the drum of said heattreating chamber perpendicularly to the central axis of the drum at the feeding and discharge parts, respectively; four lips of L-shape in cross-section, one side of each one of two of said lips being overlaid on the surface of each one of said blank flanges, the other side thereof being inserted into one side of a rectangular opening for providing said two lips in each blank flange, on one surface thereof, and spaced, in respect of the other surface, apart from the other side of the other opposed lip, by a predetermined clearance which allows the fibrous materials to pass therethrough, said other side of said lips having a tip with an inclined surface;

C. at least two of a pair of sealing chambers provided adjacently to each one of said blank flanges; each one of said sealing chambers being formed by the following three members: i. the inside wall of an extension of the drum of said drum-type heat-treating chamber, ii. an upper or lower half part of each one of said blank flanges, and iii. each one plate of at least two pairs of sealing plates fixed to the drum and obliquely traversing the interior of the drum toward said inclined surface; the tip ends of each one of said pairs of sealing plates being spaced apart by a predetermined clearance; the surface of each end part of each one of said pairs of sealing plates facing said inclined surface being spaced apart by a predetermined clearance from said inclined surface; the angle between each one of said blank flanges and each one plate of said pairs of sealing plates being not more than and D. two chambers for overflowing a sealing fluid which is introduced into said sealing chambers through pipes for introducing the sealing fluid and then ejected through said predetermined clearances, while applying a static pressure to the atmosphere around the fibrous materials, between the sealing plates and said inclined surface, passing through said predetermined clearances between the sealing plates to thereby prevent leakage of the pressurized heating fluid from said heating chamher. 2. An apparatus according to claim 1, wherein the sealing fluid is water.

3. An apparatus according to claim 1, wherein means for recovering and recycling the sealing fluid are provided.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3824917 *Nov 7, 1972Jul 23, 1974Itami Keiran Kako KkSterilization and/or cooking apparatus
US3927540 *Jun 19, 1974Dec 23, 1975Asahi Chemical IndApparatus for continuously heat-treating fibrous materials under pressure
US4058364 *Nov 11, 1975Nov 15, 1977Q. P CorporationHigh-pressure thermal sterilizer having liquid recirculating means
US4296059 *Jul 20, 1979Oct 20, 1981American Cyanamid CompanyPressure sealing process
US4308237 *Dec 31, 1979Dec 29, 1981Q.P. CorporationHigh pressure sterilizer
US4411075 *Oct 14, 1981Oct 25, 1983Lohmann Gmbh & Co. KgProcess and apparatus for drying of solvent containing material
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US4711040 *May 1, 1986Dec 8, 1987Yoshida Kogyo K. K.Apparatus for continuously thermally treating elongate textile products
US5931972 *May 23, 1995Aug 3, 1999University Of Manchester Institute Of Science And TechnologyProcessing textile structures
US6139588 *Jul 20, 1999Oct 31, 2000University Of Manchester Institute Of Science And TechnologyProcessing textile structures
US6397444Feb 25, 2000Jun 4, 2002University Of Manchester Institute Of Science & TechnologyApparatus and method for texturing yarn
US6438934Feb 25, 2000Aug 27, 2002University Of Manchester Institute Of Science And TechnologyApparatus and method for fabrication of textiles
US6745598Oct 4, 2002Jun 8, 2004University Of Manchester Institute Of Science & TechnologyPrecision delivery system
US7279440May 20, 2002Oct 9, 20073M Innovative Properties CompanyNonwoven amorphous fibrous webs and methods for making them
US7470389Sep 3, 2004Dec 30, 20083M Innovative Properties CompanyMethod for forming spread nonwoven webs
US7591058Jun 14, 2007Sep 22, 20093M Innovative Properties CompanyNonwoven amorphous fibrous webs and methods for making them
US7695660Mar 21, 2005Apr 13, 20103M Innovative Properties CompanyBondable, oriented, nonwoven fibrous webs and methods for making them
US7744807Aug 7, 2006Jun 29, 20103M Innovative Properties Companymolecular orientation provides birefringence; formed by extrusion, annealing; dimensional stability
CN100453720CJul 11, 2001Jan 21, 2009天科纺织机械部件有限公司Method and device for continuously treating synthetic fibers in heat exchange chamber
DE3534786A1 *Sep 30, 1985Apr 17, 1986Svz SncVorrichtung zum kontinuierlichen behandeln mit dampf eines bandes von textilfasern
DE4239521A1 *Nov 25, 1992May 26, 1994Burkhard Prof Dr Ing WulfhorstMoving yarn heating - uses saturated steam from medium with structured boiling point at given pressure for condensation to heat yarn to required temp.
DE10058543A1 *Nov 24, 2000Jan 24, 2002Temco TextilmaschkomponentVerfahren und Vorrichtung zur kontinuierlichen Behandlung von synthetischen Fäden in einer Wärmeaustauschkammer
DE10348278A1 *Oct 17, 2003May 25, 2005Saurer Gmbh & Co. KgVerfahren und Vorrichtung zur Behandlung eines laufenden Fadens mit einem gas- und dampfförmigen Behandlungsmedium
EP1348785A1 *Mar 27, 2003Oct 1, 2003Power- heat-set GmbHDevice for treating elongated goods, especially thread like textile yarns
WO1981000221A1 *Jun 9, 1980Feb 5, 1981American Cyanamid CoPressure sealing process
WO2002006575A1 *Jul 11, 2001Jan 24, 2002Rolf MachatschkeMethod and device for continuously treating synthetic fibers in a heat exchange chamber
WO2004022825A1 *Aug 13, 2003Mar 18, 2004Mueller-Probandt SteffenMethod and device for providing heat exchangers supplied with liquids with a heat exchanging medium
Classifications
U.S. Classification68/5.00E, 34/242
International ClassificationD02J13/00, D06B23/16
Cooperative ClassificationD06B23/16
European ClassificationD06B23/16