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Publication numberUS3784046 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 8, 1974
Filing dateApr 19, 1972
Priority dateApr 19, 1972
Publication numberUS 3784046 A, US 3784046A, US-A-3784046, US3784046 A, US3784046A
InventorsCata N
Original AssigneeCata N
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Prefected case
US 3784046 A
Abstract
A case or receptacle for cigarettes, change or as a purse itself, for example, and having opposed casing parts freely pivoted at a lower extremity without linking elements, but by eyelets disposed in an aperture formed partially in one casing part and partially in the other casing part, which parts are held together by opposing pairs of pincer springs which also serve to establish stable open and closed positions of the casing parts. The bottom of the case is closed by an element which is removably secured in notches along the outer edges of the casing parts and allows the free opening and closing of the case while retaining its contents securely.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [1 1 Cata [4 Jan. 8, 1974 PREFECTED CASE [21] Appl. No.: 245,429

[52] US. Cl. 220/35, 206/41 B [51] Int. Cl B65d 43/15, B65d 51/10 [58] Field of Search 206/41 B, 41 A;

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,907,107 5/1933 Hiering 206/41 B FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 363,186 8/1962 Switzerland 220/35 Primary ExaminerGeorge T. Hall Attomey-John W. Malley et al.

[5 7] ABSTRACT A case or receptacle for cigarettes, change or as a purse itself, for example, and having opposed casing parts freely pivoted at a lower extremity without linking elements, but by eyelets disposed in an aperture formed partially in one casing part and partially in the other casing part, which parts are held together by opposing pairs of pincer springs which also serve to establish stable open and closed positions of the casing parts. The bottom of the case is closed by an element which is removably secured in notches along the outer edges of the casing parts and allows the free opening and closing of the case while retaining its contents securely.

9 Claims, 10 Drawing Figures PATENTEUMN 81914 3,784,046

SHEEI 1 [IF 3 PATENTEB JAN 81974 SHEET 3 [1F 3 FIGS FIGS

PREFECTED CASE This invention is directed to a perfected case which is generally of parallelepiped shape, and which may be used for any number of different applications such as a purse or change purse, cigarette case and the like.

The case of the present invention presents many advantageous characteristics compared with cases in the prior art. In the past, such cases have generally not had the ability to be readily opened to a stable position, while at the same time having parts readily assembled without hinges or the like pivoting the parts between open and closed positions. In addition, prior art cases have not had the ability to retain their contents when opened without some sort of bottom that is integral with the casing sides.

It is, therefore, an object of the present invention to overcome the foregoing disadvantages or prior casings, and to provide a case which has opposing casing parts that may be opened and closed in stable positions by virtue of pincer springs. In addition, an object of this invention is to provide those casing parts with pivot point cutouts for eyelets so that the casing parts may be freely joined by the simple supporting of both parts with an eyelet and without necessity of linking elements other than the pincer springs which hold the parts together as well as establish the stable open and closed positions.

It is further an object of this invention to provide a lower cover or closing element which has some resilient characteristic in its side walls which are joined to the upper casing parts by grooves and inturned edges disposed therein.

Still further objects and advantages of this invention will become more apparent upon considering the following detailed descriptions thereof, in conjunction with the illustrative drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a case shown in its closed position;

FIG. 2 is a vertical section, approximately midway of the FIG. 1 case looking rightward therein, with the lower cover or closing element detached;

FIG. 2A is a vertical section of the lower closing element corresponding to the FIG. 2 section;

FIG. 3 is a right side elevational view of FIG. 2;

FIG. 3A is a side elevational view of the lower closing element of FIG. 2A;

FIG. 4 is a transverse sectional view looking downward along the line IV-IV of FIG. 2 with the upper pincer spring removed;

FIG. 5 is a side elevational view of the complete case in closed position, partially cut away;

FIG. 6 is a vertical section view taken substantially along the lines VI-Vl of FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 is an elevational left end view of the closed case shown in FIG. 5; and

FIG. 8 is a transverse sectional view of the FIG. 5 closed case taken substantially along the lines VIII- -VIII thereof.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION As presented in the exemplary illustration shown in the drawings, in which like numbers are employed in the different figures for the same parts, a case according to the present invention includes two opposing casing parts 1 and 2, which are substantially of the same size and together with the lower closing element 11 form a case which generally is of parallelepiped shape. The case is opened by means of relatively pulling the two casing parts 1 and 2 in opposite directions and closed by relatively pushing them back together.

As shown, casing parts 1 and 2 have respective main front or outside walls or faces 1' and 2' at right angles to which are respective top walls or faces 3 and 4 and two opposite side walls 5 for casing l, with casing 2 having similar opposite side walls 6. Each set of side walls connects, preferably integrally to the main outside walls 1' and 2' and also to respective top walls 3 and 4. Casing parts 1 and 2 may be made of metal or plastic, for example.

The two casing parts 1 and 2 are pivoted relative to one another by means of an eyelet or rivet 7 on one side and 8 on the other side. As is apparent from the drawings, eyelets 7 and 8 are at a relatively low level considering the overall height of the case, and form pivot points about which the casing parts 1 and 2 are pivoted from a closed position such as shown in FIG. 1 to an open position such as shown in FIG. 2. Eyelets 7 and 8 are respectively disposed in semi-circular cutout portions 18 formed at the pivot points in each pair of the inner edges of adjacent sides 5 and 6. The casing parts 1 and 2 are held together on eyelets 7 and 8 by two pairs of pincer springs 9 and 10. As noted in the drawings, these springs are both of vee-shape, with the upper spring 9 being an inverted vee so that the pair of springs 9 and 10 are opposed to each other. There is a similar pair of pincer springs on each side of the case with each pair being inside the case adjacent the respective side walls 5 and 6. The outer ends of each of the pair of pincer springs 9 and 10 are turned outwardly and back onto the side walls to form hooks secured by notch means such as the respective notches 21 and 22. That is, the adjacent outer ends of one pair of springs 9 and 10 hook into one notch 21 in the outer edge of a side wall 5, while the opposite pair of adjacent outer ends of the same pair of springs hooks into notch 22 in the outer edge of the opposing aligned side wall 6.

As will be noted in various figures of the drawing, for example FIG. 2, the inner edges of side walls 5 and 6 extend from the top walls 3 and 4 downward parallel to the outside main walls 1' and 2', but just to the pivot points for eyelets 7 and 8. From there downward, the inner edges of side walls 5 and 6 are cut back in a straight line forming angled edges 19 and 20. These edges 19 and 20 form an acute angel relative to the outside edges of side walls 5 and 6, and operate against each other to function as stops to limit the amount the casings 1 and 2 may be pivoted open as shown in FIG. 2.

Besides holding the two casing parts 1 and 2 together, the two pairs of pincer springs 9 and 10 serve an important function of causing casing parts to be stable in either an open or closed position. That is, as shown in FIGS. 1, 6 and 7 for example, the case is closed and remains stable in a closed position because of pincer springs 9 and 10. In the closed position, the inner edges of top walls 3 and 4 are in abutment, as are the adjacent aligned pairs of side walls 5 and 6. These inner edges of casings 1 and 2 preferably include respective rims 16 and 17. Rim 16 extends continuously from the pivot point for eyelet 7 up the adjacent side wall 5, across the top wall 3 and down the other side wall 5 to the pivot point for the opposite eyelet 8. In like manner, rim 17 forms the inner abutting edge for casing 2 by extending 3 continuously from the pivot point for eyelet 7 up the adjacent side wall 6, across top wall 4 and down the opposite side wall 6 to the opposite pivot point for eyelet 8. In the closed position of the case, rims 16 and 17 completely abut.

n the other hand, when casings l and 2 are relatively pulled apart so that the lower angled edge stops l9 and 20 come into abutment, pincer springs 9 and 10 hold the case in that open position such as shown in FIG. 2. In other words, the case is stable in either of its opened or closed positions by virtue of the action of springs 9 and 10, and the casing parts 1 and 2 are unstable in any intermediate position. That is, once the casing parts are relatively moved with a little manual pull from their closed stable position, or a little manual push from their open stable position, springs 9 and 10 tend to urge the casing parts to the opposite stable position and then maintain the casing parts in that new position.

As particularly shown in FIGS. 2 and 3, preferably the outside main walls 1' and 2 extend downwardly only to a level just above the pivot points for eyelets 7 and 8. However, the bottom of the case is closed by a cover in the form of lower casing element 11 which has two upright walls 12 and 12 with respective inturned hooks 14 and 15 at each corner in the upper edge of each wall. The lower casing element 11 is removeably secured to the upper casings 1 and 2 by the insertion l. A case of generally parallelepiped shape for en- 7 closing something and bieng operable and closeable,

of hooks l4 and 15 into respective notches 23 and 24 in side walls 5 and 6. At right angles to the upright walls 12 and 12', and disposed at opposite ends of the bottom of closing element 11, are end walls 13 and 13' shown in FIGS. 2A and 5-7. It will be particularly noted that ends walls 13 and 13' are not connected to but separated from upright walls 12 and 12', thereby giving these upright walls the opportunity to move inward and outward with notches 23 and 24 as the case is closed and opened. In other words, the lower casing element 11 is made of material so that upright walls 12 and 12 have some resiliency and can consequently move outward when the casing parts are opened to their FIG. 2 position and will spring back to their normal vertical position shown therefor in FIG. 2A when the casing parts 1 and 2 are closed as in FIGS. 6 and 7, for example. The lower casing element 11 may be attached to the case initially by either spreading upright wals l2 and 12' manually and positioning them so that their hooks l4 and 15 will drop into notches 23 and 24 of both pairs of side walls 5 and 6, or alternatively, it may be possible to slide the lower closing element 11 into those notches from either end of the case.

From the foreging description, it becomes apparent that the objects of this invention have been implemented, and in particular, that the two casings l and 2 are joined free by the pivoting eyelets 7 and 8 without the necessity of any linking elements except pincer springs 9 and 10 which supply the triple functions of not only holding the casing parts together, but establishing stable open and closed positions therefor.

While this invention has been described in detail in a given embodiment, it is of course apparent that variations may be made thereto within the scope of the appended claims, and hence, limitation to the described embodiment is not intended except as specified in the claims.

What is claimed is:

comprising:

two opposing casing parts substantially of the same size,

each casing part having a main outside wall with opposed side walls and a top wall, the side and top walls of each casing part being disposed substantially at right angles to the respective main wall and having edges respectively directed toward the like opposing edges of the side and top walls of the opposing casing part, the said opposing edges of the side walls extending substantially parallel to their respective main outside wall from their top downward to a point relatively close to the bottom ends of said side walls,

each of said opposing edges being angled outwardly from said point downward toward the said bottom end of the respective side wall to form angled edge stops,

means for pivoting said casing parts relative to each other about the said points in the said opposing edges of both side walls with the respective side and top walls of opposing casing parts in alignment, and

means including at least one pair of opposed pincer springs each having outer ends secured respectively to the casing parts adjacent the level of said points, for biasingly determining for said casing parts not only a closed stable position in which there is abutment of said opposing edges of the side walls from said pivot points upward to the top thereof, but also an open stable position in which there is abutment of adjacent ones said angled edge stops,

wherein said main outside wall of each of said casing parts extends from said top wall downwardly to a level just above said pivot points, and

wherein said case includes a lower closing element having a bottom and connected thereto at opposite edges two resilient upright walls,

there being means for removeably securing said upright walls to said casing parts respectively so that said lower closing element stays secured during the opening and closing of said casing parts and said upright walls effectively operate as an extension of said main outside walls to the bottom of said case.

2. A case as in claim 1 wherein each of said side and top wall edges of each of said opposing casing parts includes a rim extending continuously along said side and top walls, said rims of the opposing casing parts being in abutment when the casing parts are in said closed stable position.

3. A case as in claim 1 wherein said pivoting means includes at each of said pivot points a respective eyelet disposed in an aperture formed by a substantially semicircular cutout in each of said opposing edges at said pivot points.

4. A case as in claim 1 wherein each of said opposed pincer springs is generally of vee-shape and one is inverted relative to the other, said outer ends of said pincer springs being secured to aligned side walls of the opposing casing parts by notch means in said aligned side walls.

5. A case as in claim 1 wherein said means for removeably securing said upright walls to said casing parts includes notch means in the outer edges of said side walls adjacent the level of said pivot points and inturned hooks in the upper edge at the outer ends of each of said upright walls for receipt by said notch means.

6. A case as in claim 1 wherein said lower closing element includes opposing end walls secured to opposite ends of the bottom of said closing element and upwardly extending in a separated manner from said upright walls to allow said upright walls to move resiliently inwardly and outwardly with the closing and opening of said casing parts.

7. A case of generally parallelepiped shape for enclosing something and being operable and closeable, comprising:

two opposing casing parts substantially of the same size,

each casing part having a main outside wall with opposed side walls and a top wall, the side and top walls of each casing part being disposed substantially at right angles to the respective main wall and having edges respectively directed toward the like opposing edges of the side and top walls of the opposing casing part, the said opposing edges of the side walls extending substantially parallel to their respective main outside wall from their top downward to a point relatively close to the bottom ends of said side walls,

each of said opposing edges being angled outwardly from said point downward toward the said bottom end of the respective side wall to form angled edge stops,

means for pivoting said casing parts relative to each other about the siad points in the said opposing edges of both side walls with the respective side and top walls of opposing casing parts in alignment, said pivoting means including at each of said pivot points a respective eyelet disposed in an aperture formed by a substantially semi-circular cutout in each of said opposing edges at said pivot points, means including two pairs of opposed pincer springs for biasingly determining for said casing parts not only a closed stable position in which there is abutment of said opposing edges of the side walls from said pivot points upward to the top thereof, but also an open stable position in which there is abutment LII of adjacent ones said angled edge stops,

each of said opposed pincer springs having outer ends and being generally of vee-shape with one spring of each pair being inverted relative to the other spring in the same pair, said pairs of springs being disposed inside said casing parts adjacent the aligned side walls respectively with the said outer ends of each pair of said pincer springs being secured respectively to the adjacent aligned side walls by notch means in the outer edges of those adjacent aligned side walls,

said main outside wall of each of said casing parts extending from said top wall downwardly to a level just above said pivot points, and

a lower closing element having a bottom and connected thereto at opposite edges two resilient upright walls, there being means for removeably securing said upright walls to said casing parts respectively so that said lower closing element stays secured during the opening and closing of said casing parts and said upright walls effectively operate as an extension of said main outside walls to the bottom of said case.

8. A case as in claim 7 wherein each of said side and top wall edges of each of said opposing casing parts includes a rim extending continuously along said side and top walls, said rims of the opposing casing parts being in abutment when the casing parts are in said closed stable position.

9. A case as in claim 8 where:

said means for removeably securing said upright walls to said casing parts includes notch means in the outer edges of said side walls adjacent the level of said pivot points and inturned hooks in the upper edge at the outer ends of each of said upright walls for receipt by said notch means, and

said lower closing element includes opposing end walls secured to opposite ends of the bottom of said closing element and upwardly extend in a separated manner from said upright walls to allow said upright walls to move resiliently inwardly and outwardly with the closing and opening of said casing parts.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1907107 *Oct 21, 1930May 2, 1933Mergott J E CoCigarette package holder
CH363186A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4681216 *Jun 10, 1986Jul 21, 1987Steven W. HewittDisplay case for fragrance bottles, jewelry, or the like, and hinge used therein
US4684016 *Jun 10, 1986Aug 4, 1987Steven W. HewittDisplay case for fragrance bottles, jewelry, or the like
US4749098 *Aug 21, 1987Jun 7, 1988Ketcham & Mcdougall, Inc.File card container
US6039174 *Nov 2, 1998Mar 21, 2000Rogers; GrahamContainer
US6415915 *May 21, 2001Jul 9, 2002Morris GrossmanEyeglass case stand
US7635342 *Jun 1, 2004Dec 22, 2009Stereotaxis, Inc.System and methods for medical device advancement and rotation
US8114032 *Dec 21, 2009Feb 14, 2012Stereotaxis, Inc.Systems and methods for medical device advancement and rotation
DE2943740A1 *Oct 30, 1979May 7, 1981Draegerwerk AgMoulded package for ten ampoules - consists of two half shells sealed together with shorter dividing sheet folded between
EP0951847A2 *Sep 16, 1998Oct 27, 1999Graham RogersA container
Classifications
U.S. Classification220/826, 206/261
International ClassificationA45C11/00, A45C11/24
Cooperative ClassificationA45C11/24
European ClassificationA45C11/24