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Publication numberUS3784133 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 8, 1974
Filing dateJan 19, 1972
Priority dateJan 19, 1972
Publication numberUS 3784133 A, US 3784133A, US-A-3784133, US3784133 A, US3784133A
InventorsHill V, Mcdowell J, Southam E
Original AssigneeLindsay Wire Weaving Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Seam for woven paper making fabrics
US 3784133 A
Abstract
A seam for joining opposite ends of a woven fabric to form a loop or belt suitable for various uses in connection with paper making machines. The seam is formed by using weft strands from the woven fabric for seam wefts. Weft strands on each end of the woven fabric are removed to leave warp pickets which are then interwoven with the seam wefts to form the seam, whereby the pattern of the weave across the seam is the same as that in the body of the fabric. The ends of successive warp strands are terminated over different seam wefts in a pattern which includes at least a six-warp sequence. The ends of adjacent warp strands terminate in spaced rows of seam wefts in a repeated sequence with a plurality of seam wefts between adjacent rows. The spacing and direction of the respective warp terminations are such as to achieve suitable seam strength and a reduced tendency to mark the paper sheet formed on the belt.
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United States Patent [191 Hill, Jr. et a1.

[ SEAM FOR WOVEN PAPER MAKING FABRICS [75] Inventors: Vernon J. Hill, Jr., Chagrin Falls;

Earl A. Southam, Cleveland Heights, both of Ohio; John R. McDowell, Knoxville, Tenn.

[73] Assignee: The Lindsay Wire Weaving Company, Cleveland, Ohio [22] Filed: Jan. 19, 1972 [21] Appl. N0.: 219,050

[451 Jan. 8, 1974 Primary Examiner Richard .1. l-lerbst Att0rneyTeare, Teare & Sammon [5 7 ABSTRACT A seam for joining opposite ends of a woven fabric to form a loop or belt suitable for various uses in connection with paper making machines. The seam is formed by using weft strands from the woven fabric for seam wefts. Weft strands on each end of the woven fabric are removed to leave warp pickets which are then interwoven with the seam wefts to form the seam, whereby the pattern of the weave across the seam is the same as that in the body of the fabric. The ends of successive warp strands are terminated over different seam wefts in a pattern which includes at least a sixwarp sequence. The ends of adjacent warp strands terminate in spaced rows of seam wefts in a repeated sequence with a plurality of seam wefts between adjacent rows. The spacing and direction of the respective warp terminations are such as to achieve suitable seam strength and a reduced tendency to mark the paper sheet formed on the belt.

2 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures PATENTED JAN 74 BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field This invention relates to a seam for fabric woven of metal or plastic warps and wefts or a combination of the two in which the warps terminate along a band of seam wefts in a predetermined pattern.

2. Desription of the Prior Art Fabrics used for paper making such as the paper forming belt on a Fourdrinier machine, or covers on press rolls of a paper making machine, are often woven as a length of fabric with metal and/or plastic warps and wefts and the opposite ends of the fabric are then joined along a seam to form an endless belt or loop. Various forms of seams have been illustrated in US. Pats. No. 3,366,355 and No. 3,552,691. The making of a seam by butt-welding the warp ends or by adhesively connecting the warp ends has not been found to develop adequate strength and tend to mark the paper sheet produced. Other methods, such as sewing or lacing are disadvantageous in that an irregularity is usually formed in the belt, as a consequence of which objectionable irregularities occur in the resulting paper sheet.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to an improvement in a seam construction by utilizing at least a six-warp sequence in a repeated pattern wherein all of the corresponding warp ends of a sequence terminate at a common seam weft. Thus, the seam has spaced rows wherein all of the warp ends on a first warp of each sequence terminate on a common row adjacent one edge of the seam, and all of the warp ends on the sixth warp of each sequence terminate on a common row adjacent the opposite edge of the seam. The intervening warp ends are spaced in rows lying between the first and sixth rows and such rows are so related to the warp ends of the sequence, that the distance between the warp ends on any two adjacent warp strands comprises at least two of the rows throughout the sequence, with the additional provision that the warp ends on the intermediate strands terminate in rows which are located in a prearranged direction with respect to the first and last rows respectively. Such arrangement results in the attainment of a seam which has a high tensile strength.

An object of the present invention is to provide a new seam construction for use in woven metal or plastic fabrics, as employed in paper making which utilizes at least a six-warp pattern, wherein the warp ends of the respective warp strands in a sequence are so positioned with reference to each other, that maximum resistance to distortion during use will be attained.

A further object of the invention is that if distortion or warp-end wear should occur, the relative location of the warp ends is such as to minimize the detrimental effeet on the performance of the seam and belt.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 illustrates in perspective view a Fourdrinier belt formed of woven fabric and illustrates the belt as being mounted upon supporting rolls on the paper making machine;

FIG. 2 is a longitudinal sectional view on an enlarged scale showing a portion ofthe belt adjacent the seam;

FIG. 3 illustrates an embodiment of the seam construction of the present invention in a six-warp pattern; and

FIG. 4 illustrates an embodiment of the seam construction of the present invention and shows a seam utilizing an eight-warp pattern.

DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENT FIG. 1 illustrates typical use of a seam construction embodying the present invention. It shows an endless belt as may be used as the paper making surface on a Fourdrinier machine. The belt is formed from a length of woven fabric having its opposite ends joined along a seam l1, and is shown as being mounted upon rolls 12 and 13, respectively, the latter of which may comprise the driving roll. The arrows 14 and 15 indicate the direction of movement of the upper and lower reaches respectively of the belt while in operation on a machine.

The body of the fabric comprises warp strands which extend in the direction of the arrow 14 in FIG. 1, which are interwoven with weft strands which extend transversely of the belt and at a right angle to the direction of the arrow 14. The fabric is woven so as to have a length greater than that required for the finished belt.

Subsequent processing may occur. For example, in the case of an all plastic belt, it may be stretched and heat-set so as to control the shape of the warp and weft knuckle configuration and to impart desirable characteristics to the finished product.

Prior to making the seam described herein, the belt is trimmed to a desired length which is greater than the length it will be after seaming. Woven wefts are removed from each end of the belt for a desired distance to provide warp end extensions necessary to the construction of the article claimed. These warp extensions are termed pickets. Elements that are woven wefts in the belt become seam wefts in the construction of the article claimed.

The seam wefts are then placed between the ends of the fabric and the opposing warp pickets are interwoven with the seam wefts so as to maintain the same pattern of weave across the seam as that which existed in the body of the fabric. During such weaving operation the opposing warp ends are brought out within the seam area adjacent the same seam weft and the excess portion of each warp picket is cut off. As shown, for example, in FIG. 2, the warp pickets 18 and 19 on opposite ends of the same warp strand are terminated at 20 and 21, respectively, adjacent the same seam weft 22.

FIG. 3 shows, on an enlarged scale, the seam area 16 after the seam wefts have been interwoven with the warp pickets. In such illustration the seam wefts extend from left to right and the warp strands extend from top to bottom. The various rows of seam wefts, adjacent which the warp ends of the respective warp strands are terminated, are indicated at A to F, respectively, wherein an X at the junction of the warp strands with the seam wefts indicate the locations at which the warp ends of the respective warp strands are located with reference to each other.

In FIG. 3, the upper edge of the seam is in the region designated and the lower edge of the seam is in the region designated 26. Commencing with the first warp strand 30, the warp ends terminate on row A at after the pickets have been interwoven with the seam wefts, as shown in FIG. 2. Similarly, the warp ends for the second warp strand 31 are indicated at 41 on row C. The

pattern in FIG. 3 is shown as a six-warp pattern, hence the warp-end terminations for the third warp strand 32 occur at 42 on row E; the warp ends for the fourth warp strand 33 occur at 43 on row B; the warp ends for the fifth warp strand 34 occur at 44 on row D, while the warp ends for the sixth warp strand 35 occur at 45 on row F. The pattern is then repeated so that the warp ends for the first warp strand 36 on the second pattern terminate at row A and are indicated at 46.

The foregoing seam pattern shows that the location of the warp ends for the second warp strand 31 skip the row B and are at row C. Similarly, the location of the warp ends for the warp strand 32 skip row D and are at row E. Such rows are positioned in the direction toward row F with respect to row A. The direction is then changed so that the location of the warp ends for In the foregoing arrangement there are five warp strands between any two warp end terminations on the samerow. Additionally, the spacing in a warp-wise direction on adjacent warp strands is at least two rows. In practice, assuming that about 60 seam wefts extend between rows A and F, then by spacing the rows A to F as nearly equal as possible, there will be at least 23 or 2 4 seam wefts between the warp termination on adjacent warp strands. The net results of the arrangement is that the load on the seam during use is distributed more uniformly over the same area.

The present invention is applicable for various forms of weave patterns, that illustrated in FIG. 2 being a semi-twill weave where the warp strand passes over one weft strand and then under two in succession. The invention is also applicable for use in what is termed in the art as a four-harness satin weave, as is illustrated, for example, in FIG. 4, wherein the pattern extends across eight-warp strands and has the warp ends terminating in eight rows. In such figure, the rows are indicated as .I to respectively, while the beginning of a new pattern would occur on warp strand 58. Additionally, in FIG. 4, the warp end terminations occur progressively on row 1, L, N, P, K, M, O and Q. As the pattern is repeated, the warp ends for warp strand 58 terminate at row J so that seven-warp strands lie between adjacent warp terminations on the same row. As shown in FIG. 4, the seam may have about 80 seam wefts, and again the spacing between rows of seam wefts should be as nearly equal as possible. In this arrangement, the location of warp ends again skip at least one row and extend generally in the direction of the row 0 for for the second, third and fourth warp strands, then back to row K in the direction of the first row and then back toward the row Q for the remaining three warp terminations.

The foregoing seam construction enables the weave pattern in the body of the fabric to be continued across the seam and at the same time enables a seam to be made which will provide adequate strength and reduced seam marking tendency for fabrics which are woven of synthetic material, such as nylon or Trevira. The seam is also suitable for use where some of the strands are made of metal and others in the same fabric are made of synthetic materials.

it has been woven and which have been interwoven with warp-ends projecting from each end of the fabric so as to maintain across the seam the same weave pattern as that of the woven fabric,

said seam having a first edge portion adjacent one end of the fabric and having a second edge portion adjacent the other end of the fabric,

said warp-ends being arranged in a six-warp sequence wherein the ends of the adjacent warp strands terminate in spaced rows of seam-wefts designated as first to sixth row respectively, in a repeated sequence, and there being a plurality of seam-wefts between adjacent rows,

both of the warp ends of the first warp strand in each sequence terminating in the first row adjacent one edge portion of the seam,

both of the warp ends of the last warp strand in each sequence terminating in the sixth row adjacent the other edge portion of the seam,

all of the intermediate warp ends in each sequence terminating in rows two to five,

the distance between the warp ends on adjacent warp strands comprising at least two of said rows throughout the sequence,

the spacing of the warp ends on adjacent warp strands progressively throughout the sequence being as follows:

the warp ends on the second warp strand are spaced two rows from said first row and in the direction of the sixth row,

the warp ends on the third warp strand are spaced two rows from the warp ends on the second warp strand and in the direction of the sixth row,

the warp ends on the fourth warp strand are spaced three rows from the warp ends on the third warp strand and in the direction of the first row,

the warp ends on the fifth warp strand are spaced two rows from the warp ends on the fourth warp strand and in the direction of the sixth row, and

the warp ends on the sixth warp strand are spaced two rows from the warp ends on the fifth warp strand and in the direction of the sixth row.

2. In a length of woven fabric having its ends joined by a seam to form a loop, said length of fabric comprising spaced warps interwoven with spaced wefts (hereinafter referred to as woven-wefts) in a selected repeated pattern and said woven-wefts being crimped during the weaving of the fabric to have knuckles in which fabric the warps and woven-wefts are metal or plastic, the combination wherein:

the seam comprises a plurality of seam-wefts which have been removed from the length of fabric after it has been woven, and which have been interwoven with warp ends projecting from each end of the fabric, so as to maintain across the seam the same weave pattern as that of the woven fabric,

said seam having a first edge portion adjacent one end of the fabric and having a second edge portion adjacent the other end of the fabric,

said warp ends being arranged in an eight-warp sequence wherein the ends of the adjacent warp strands terminate in spaced rows of seam-wefts designated as first to eighth row respectively in a repeated sequence, and there being a plurality of seam wefts between adjacent rows,

both of the warp ends on the first warp strand in each sequence terminating in the first row adjacent one edge portion of the seam,

both of the warp ends on the last warp strand in each sequence terminating in the eighth row adjacent the other edge portion of the seam,

all of the intermediate warp ends in each sequence terminating in rows two to seven,

the distance between the warp ends on adjacent warp strands comprising at least two of said rows throughout the sequence,

and the spacing of the warp ends on adjacent warp strands progressively throughout the sequence being as follows:

the warp ends on the second warp strand are spaced two rows from said first row and in the direction of the eighth row,

the warp ends on the third warp strand are spaced two rows from the warp ends on the second warp strand and in the direction of the eighth row,

the warp ends on the fourth warp strand are spaced two rows from the warp ends on the third warp strand and in the direction of the eighth row,

the warp ends on the fifth warp strand are spaced five rows from the warp ends on the fourth warp strand and in the direction of the first row,

the warp ends on the sixth warp strand are spaced two rows from the warp ends on the fifth warp strand and in the direction of the eighth row,

the warp ends on the seventh warp strand are spaced two rows from the warp ends on the sixth warp strand and in the direction of the eighth row, and

the warp ends on the eighth warp strand are spaced two rows from the warp ends on the seventh warp strand and in the direction of the eighth row.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3335986 *Sep 1, 1965Aug 15, 1967Fabric Res LabHand laced seams
US3366355 *Oct 13, 1965Jan 30, 1968Appleton Wire Works CorpSeam for woven metal or plastic fabric for papermaking machines
US3552691 *Dec 18, 1967Jan 5, 1971Appleton Wire Works CorpSeam for woven papermaking fabrics
US3596858 *May 2, 1969Aug 3, 1971Appleton Wire Works CorpFourdrinier seam
US3700194 *Aug 18, 1971Oct 24, 1972Jwi LtdSeam for woven fabric
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4771814 *Apr 13, 1987Sep 20, 1988Niagara Lockport Industries, Inc.Seam for multilayer papermaking fabric and method of making same
US7005038 *Oct 4, 2002Feb 28, 2006National Wire Fabric, Inc.Belt-machine combination
US20100181247 *Jan 15, 2010Jul 22, 2010Frank EsserDewatering belt for flue gas desulphurisation installations, of a single-layered fabric belt
Classifications
U.S. Classification245/10
International ClassificationB21F33/00
Cooperative ClassificationB21F33/007
European ClassificationB21F33/00D