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Publication numberUS3784204 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 8, 1974
Filing dateNov 10, 1971
Priority dateNov 10, 1971
Publication numberUS 3784204 A, US 3784204A, US-A-3784204, US3784204 A, US3784204A
InventorsFelber J
Original AssigneeFelber J, Szabo B
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Hockey puck
US 3784204 A
Abstract
An improved hockey puck having spherical rollers mounted and retained in depressions formed on each face of the puck during the molding of the puck. The depressions on one face are laterally offset with respect to the depressions on the other face so as to obtain accurately dimensioned depressions after the molding operation.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1191 Felber Jan. 8, 1974 I HOCKEY PUCK 3,350,252 10/1967 Twickler 273/010. 4 [75] Inventor: Julius Felber, Montreal, Quebec, FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS Canada 27,284 12/1908 Great Britain 273/126 R [73] Assignees: Julius Felber; Bela Szabo, Montreal,

Quebec, Canada [22] Filed: Nov. 10, 1971 211 App]. No.: 197,264

[52] US. Cl 273/128 R [51] Int. Cl A63b 71/00 [58] Field of Search 273/128, 126, l B

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,727,744 12/1955 Watson 273/128 R 2,494,929 1/1950 Colaluea 273/128 R Primary Examiner-Richard C. Pinkham Assistant Examiner-Theatrice Brown AttorneyAlan Swabey ABSTRACT An improved hockey puck having spherical rollers mounted and retained in depressions formed on each face of the puck during the molding of the puck. The depressions on one face are laterally offset with respect to the depressions on the other face so as to obtain accurately dimensioned depressions after the molding operation.

8 Claims, 3 Drawing Figures HOCKEY PUCK BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION l. Field of the Invention This invention relates to an improved hockey puck having roller means so it can be more easily used for playing on other surfaces in addition to ice.

The invention is more particularly directed toward an improved hockey puck having spherical rollers mounted in each face of the puck, the rollers in one face located in different areas relative'to the location of the rollers in the opposite face.

2. Description of the Prior Art The mounting of rollers in hockey pucks is known. However, it has been difficult to provide mountings for spherical rollers in a molded puck which are dimensionally accurate. Directly forming socket mountings during the molding of a puck usually results in mountings for spherical rollers which are out of round, thus causing binding of the rollers fitted in the sockets. In order to properly mount and retain the rollers to obtain a suitable rolling action, special mounting frames have been employed as shown in Canadian Pat. No. 527,738, issued .Iuly l7, I956, Andrew C. Watson,inventor, for example. The mounting frame is molded within the puck, and the rigid sockets, for receiving the balls, remain dimensionally accurate during molding thereby ensuring a proper rolling action. The frame,

however, is quite expensive and increases the cost of manufacturing the puck.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Applicant has discovered that the roller mountings may be formed directly in the puck during molding without distortion and without the necessity of using a rigid frame, provided the roller mountings on the opposed faces are located in a certain manner with respect to each other. The improved puck is simple and inexpensive to manufacture while still retaining good rolling properties.

The invention is particularly directed toward a hockey puck comprising a circular disk of moldable, slightly resilient material, a first set of depressions formed in one circular face of the disk, a second set of depressions formed in the other circular face of the disk, each depression having a truncated, spherical shape, a spherical roller mounted and retained in each depression with a minor portion thereof extending out of the depression, each depression of the first set on the one face, if projected to the other face along a line parallel to an axis joining the centers of the circular faces, being laterally offset from the depressions of the second set.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS The invention will now be described in detail having reference to the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a schematic view of the improved hockey puck;

FIG. 2 is a plan elevation view showing the positions of the rollers in both faces; and

FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view taken along line 3--3 of FIG. 2.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS The hockey puck comprises a cylindrical disk 1 made out of moldable, slightly resilient, material. The material can be a suitable polymer, such as polyethylene. A first set 3 of depressions 5 is formed in one face 7 of the puck during molding while a second set 9 of depressions 11 is formed in the other face 13 of the puck during molding. Each depression 5, 11 preferably has a truncated spherical shape, as shown in FIG. 3. Mounted in each depression, after molding, is a spherical ball 15 so that a minor portion of the ball projects from the depression. Each depression is sized to provide an annular edge or lip 17 which serves to retain the ball 15 within the depression. The balls are inserted into the depressions under pressure, the lips 17 expanding slightly to permit the balls to pass into the depressions and then returning to their original shape to retain the balls in the depressions.

The first and second sets 3, 9 of depressions are each arranged in a circle with th'edepressions in each circle substantially equally spaced from one another. Preferably, each depression 5, 11 is located the same radial distance R from a central axis joining the centers of the circular faces 7, 13 together.

Each depression 5 of one set 3, if projected from its face 7 to the opposite face 13 along a line parallel to the axis joining the centers of the circular faces, is laterally offset from the depressions I1 in the other face 13. Preferably, as shown in FIG. 2, each depression 5 of the first set 3 is offset circularly to a position where it lies substantially midway between two'adjacent depressions of the second set 9. 7

Each set 3, 9 of depressions is preferably located adjacent the edge or side wall 23 of the circular disk 1 to provide stability. It is preferred to mount six balls 15 on each face although more or less can be used.

It is essential to have the depressions 5 of one set 3 laterally offset from the depressions ll of the other set 9. This ensures that the truncated spherical shape of each depression is substantially retained after molding.

If, as has been normally done, each depression of one set 3 was axially aligned with a respective depression on the second set 9, stresses would be set up during the molding of the depressions. These stresses would, after molding, be relieved, and result in the depressions assuming a non-spherical shape.

It has been found that the shape of each depression is better retained after molding-if a central, circular, shallow recess 25, 27 is formed in each face 7, 13 of the puck during molding. The recesses 25, 27 result in the formation of a thin central web 29 and annular surfaces 31, 33. The circular rows of depressions of each set 3, 9 are preferably located midway between the inner and outer radius R, R of each annular surface. This results in a further reduction in stresses set up during the molding operation. The recesses 25, 27 also result in less material being required to mold the puck and also reduce the time required to mold the puck since the molded puck can be cooled and removed from the mold more rapidly. Each recess 25, 27 preferably has a depth equal to the depth of the depressions.

I claim:

1. A hockey puck comprising a circular disk of moldable, slightly resilient, material, a first set of depressions formed in one circular face of the disk, a second set of depressions formed in the other circular face of the disk, each depression having'a truncated spherical shape, a spherical roller mounted and retained in each depression with a minor portion thereof extending from the depression, each depression of the first set on the one face, if projected to the other face along a line parallel to an axis'joining the centers of the circular faces, being laterally offset from the depressions on the other face.

2. A hockey puck as claimed in claim 1, wherein each depression of each set is located substantially the same radial distance from the axis joining the centers of the circular faces.

3. A hockey puck as claimed in claim 2, wherein each depression of the first set is laterally offset to a position midway between adjacent depressions of the second set.

4. A hockey puck as claimed in claim 2, wherein the depressions in each set are substantially equally spaced from one another.

5. A hockey puck as claimed in claim 2, wherein the depressions are adjacent a side edge of the disk joining the first and second faces.

6. A hockey puck as claimed in claim 5, wherein a central, circular recess is formed in each circular face of the disk.

7. A hockey puck as claimed in claim 6, wherein each depression is radially positioned substantially midway between the radius of the recesses and the radius of the faces.

8. A hockey puck as claimed in claim 2, wherein the hockey puck is molded from polyethylene:

Patent Citations
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US2727744 *Jun 11, 1954Dec 20, 1955Watson Andrew CHockey pucks
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4000900 *Jan 10, 1975Jan 4, 1977Cyrill George LehmannCue-game and sliding disk for same
US4111419 *Jul 26, 1976Sep 5, 1978Pellegrino Peter PPractice hockey puck
US4408761 *Sep 2, 1981Oct 11, 1983Mcallister (Sports Games) LimitedGame and game devices
US4793769 *Mar 3, 1988Dec 27, 1988Michael DolanHockey puck
US5149096 *Nov 5, 1991Sep 22, 1992Keating Michael DHockey puck
US5184820 *Nov 30, 1988Feb 9, 1993Keating Michael DHockey puck
US5240251 *Dec 12, 1991Aug 31, 1993Easton SportsSliding street hockey puck
US5275410 *Sep 22, 1992Jan 4, 1994Bellehumeur Alex RPuck for use on a non-ice surface
US5284343 *Apr 17, 1992Feb 8, 1994Bigornia Boniface GPractice hockey puck
US5288072 *Feb 24, 1993Feb 22, 1994Hsieh Wen SenHockey puck
US5482274 *Sep 6, 1994Jan 9, 1996Bellehumeur; Alex R.Roller hockey puck with recessed runners
US5518238 *Jul 13, 1995May 21, 1996Primal Products, Inc.Street hockey puck
US5531442 *Dec 29, 1994Jul 2, 1996Sun Hockey, Inc.Hockey puck with integral rollers and method of assembly
US5568923 *Dec 18, 1995Oct 29, 1996Kahn; Jon B.Roller hockey puck
US5597161 *Jan 24, 1996Jan 28, 1997Bellehumeur; Alex R.Puck for use on a non-ice surface
US5697858 *Aug 9, 1995Dec 16, 1997Lekavich; Carl W.Game puck and method for construction thereof
US5733213 *Apr 7, 1997Mar 31, 1998Colarusso; MichaelRoller hockey puck and method of making the same
US5816964 *Apr 14, 1997Oct 6, 1998Ainslie; RossPuck for playing of hockey and hockey-like games on a variety of playing surfaces
US5816965 *Jun 26, 1997Oct 6, 1998Kotler; DanielHockey puck
US5855528 *Jul 12, 1996Jan 5, 1999Aiello; Jeffrey A.Hockey puck
US5928096 *Jan 23, 1997Jul 27, 1999Boardman; Craig W.Ground effect hockey puck
US6010418 *Dec 15, 1997Jan 4, 2000Lekavich; CarlGame puck with improved glider pin
US6217468Oct 4, 1999Apr 17, 2001Daryn GoodwinHockey puck with outer shock absorbing enclosure and spaced apart multiple inner core segments
US6277042Jan 4, 2000Aug 21, 2001Carl LekavichGame puck with improved glider pin
US6440018 *Jul 3, 2001Aug 27, 2002Carl LekavichGame puck with improved glider pin
US6585552Aug 17, 2001Jul 1, 2003Lawrence A. HusetCircular flying disc toy
US6595823Sep 30, 2002Jul 22, 2003Lawrence A. HusetCircular flying disk toy
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US6638188Apr 17, 2001Oct 28, 2003Arthur KleinpellPractice hockey puck
US6893367Jun 12, 2003May 17, 2005Patrick R. NudoHockey puck with aerodynamic pins
US7104906Sep 21, 2004Sep 12, 2006Michael ColemanAerodynamically augmented hockey puck
US7207909 *May 25, 2005Apr 24, 2007Samuel ChenDimpled air hockey puck
US7276001May 15, 2006Oct 2, 2007Assb Holding CompanyAerodynamically augmented hockey puck
US8657710Jun 20, 2012Feb 25, 2014Steven Michael PonaUniversal hockey puck
US8944435 *Aug 3, 2012Feb 3, 2015Justin KolbTable/parlour football
US20030157863 *Feb 12, 2003Aug 21, 2003Lawrence HusetCircular flying disk toy
US20050064967 *Sep 21, 2004Mar 24, 2005Assb Holding CompanyAerodynamically augmented hockey puck
US20060205545 *May 15, 2006Sep 14, 2006Assb Holding CompanyAerodynamically augmented hockey puck
US20060267273 *May 25, 2005Nov 30, 2006Samuel ChenDimpled air hockey puck
US20130032997 *Feb 7, 2013Justin KolbTable/Parlour Football
US20130154191 *Jul 26, 2011Jun 20, 2013Laporte HoldingTarget to be launched into the air for archery training
USRE38187 *Jan 24, 2002Jul 15, 2003Alex R. BellehumeurPuck for use on a non-ice surface
WO1993020910A1 *Mar 20, 1993Oct 28, 1993Bigornia Boniface GPractice hockey puck
WO1994006523A1 *Sep 16, 1993Mar 31, 1994Bellehumeur Alex RPuck for use on a non-ice surface
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/588
International ClassificationA63B67/14
Cooperative ClassificationA63B67/14, A63B2067/146
European ClassificationA63B67/14