Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3785149 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 15, 1974
Filing dateJun 8, 1972
Priority dateJun 8, 1972
Publication numberUS 3785149 A, US 3785149A, US-A-3785149, US3785149 A, US3785149A
InventorsTimmerman H
Original AssigneeSpecialty Prod Dev Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method for filling a bag with water vapor and carbon dioxide gas
US 3785149 A
Abstract
A deflagration composition yielding a gas comprising principally carbon dioxide and water vapor comprises a substantially homogeneous mixture of citric acid powder in the range of from about 25 to 37 percent by weight and an oxidizer powder selected from the group consisting of potassium chlorate, potassium perchlorate, sodium chlorate, and sodium perchlorate. This composition may be used adjacent a coolant powder comprising up to about 40 percent by weight of potassium chlorate and an endothermic decomposition coolant having a thermal decomposition product selected from the class consisting of carbon dioxide and water.
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States atettt Timmerman 1 1 Jan. 15, 197 3 METHOD FOR FILLING A BAG WITH 3,663,035 5/1972 Norton 102/39 x WATER VAPOR AND CARBON DIOXIDE 3,674,059 7/1972 Stephenson 102/39 X GAS 3,676,234 7/1972 Schwoyer 149/44 X 3,690,695 9/1972 Jones 102/39 X [75] Inventor: Hubert G. Timmerman, Manhattan 9 95 9/19 Sc neiter et al- 80/150 AB Beach, C lif 3,711,115 1 1973 Lohr 102/39 x [73] ASSlgnee gzi gglg fixg gz glft g ggg Primary Examiner-Stephen J. Lechert, Jr.

Ohio Att0rneyRobert L. Parker et a1.

[22] Filed: June 8, 1972 [57] ABSTRACT [2]] Appl. No.: 261,041

A deflagration composition yielding a gas comprising principally carbon dioxide and water vapor comprises [52] 60/205 149/831 280/150 a substantially homogeneous mixture of citric acid 102/39 powder in the range of from about 25 to 37 percent by [51 It ll. Cl C0611 5/00 weight and an oxidizer powder selected from the [58] Field of Search 280/150 AB; 141/10; group Consisting of potassium Chlorate potassium pep 102/39; 252/5, 6, 7; 149/83; 6 chlorate, sodium chlorate, and sodium perchlorate. This composition may be used adjacent a coolant [56] References cued powder comprising up to about 40 percent by weight UNlTED STATES PATENTS of potassium chlorate and an endothermic decomposi- 3533359 1 1970 Teague et a] 2 0 150 AB tion coolant having a thermal decomposition product 3,618,980 11/1971 Leising et a1 102/39 X selected from the class consisting of carbon dioxide 3,618,981 11/1971 Leising et a]. 280/150 AB and water, 3,647,393 3/1972 Leising et a]v 1 102/39 X 3,653,684 4/1972 Plumer 280/150 AB 9 Claims, 1 Drawing Figure METHOD FOR [FILLING A BAG WITH WATER VAPOR AND CARBON DIOXIDE GAS BACKGROUND This application is an improvement on developments described and claimed in copending U.S. Pat. application Ser. No. 167,943, entitled Gas Generator Composition and Method, by Hubert G. Timmerman and Vincent Catanzarite. The teachings of this patent application are hereby incorporated by reference.

Governmental requirements for automobile passenger restraint systems include an inflatable bag that momentarily and temporarily restrains a passenger during the critical instant of a collision impact. For safe and successful use the bag must be inflated in a very short time, and thereafter deflated to release the passenger. The gas used to inflate the bag must be cool enough to avoid damage to the bag and injury to the passenger. For similar reasons, it is important that hot particles do not reach the interior of the bag. The gases used must have a low toxicity, and for this reason, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, sulphur compounds, and the like are undesirable. It is therefore desirable to provide compositions that burn to produce a large volume of relatively cool non-toxic gas in a very short time interval for inflating a gas bag.

The composition must be sufficiently stable to sustain the temperature, vibration, and other environmental characteristics of an automobile for a prolonged period. A specified screening test requires, for example, that the composition be maintained at 250F for 100 hours without any degradation of performance. Such severe requirements effectively eliminate from consideration many otherwise apparently suitable materials.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Thus, in practice of this invention according to a presently preferred embodiment, there is provided a non-toxic gas generating composition comprising an organic acid powder selected from the group consisting of citric acid in the range of from about 25 to 37 percent by weight, tartaric acid in the range of from about 20 to 42 percent by weight, tartronic acid in the range of from about 25 to 49.5 percent by weight, and malonic acid in the range of from about 20 to 36.7 percent by weight; and a balance of an oxidizer powder selected from the group consisting of potassium chlorate, potassium perchlorate, sodium chlorate, and sodium perchlorate.

DRAWING These and other features and advantages of the present invention will be appreciated as the same becomes better understood by reference to the following detailed description of presently preferred embodiments when considered in connection with the accompanying drawing, which comprises a cross section of a gas generator cartridge employing a composition embodying principles of this invention.

DESCRIPTION FIG. 1 illustrates in longitudinal cross section a typical gas generator cartridge charged with a composition embodying principles of this invention. As illustrated in this presently preferred embodiment, a steel housing forms a gas generator cartridge which can be threaded into ahousing (not shown) or other suitable arrangement for conveying generated gases to an inflatable bag. The gas generator cartridge is open at its threaded end to permit generated gases to escape freely therefrom. If desired, a frangible or fusible protective diaphragm may be provided over the open end of the cartridge. At its closed end, the cartridge is provided with a conventional bridge wire initiator I1 and is threaded into a central opening. The initiator 11 is a conventional item wherein a bridge wire (not shown) is heated by an electric current when it is desired to initiate the gas generating reaction.

Packed into the housing 10in a layer adjacent the initiator lll is a body of propellant 12 described in greater detail hereinafter. In a typical embodiment, the layer 12 may comprise about 10 grams of propellant. Adjacent the first propellant layer 12 is an 18 gram layer of coolant 13, described in greater detail hereinafter. After the coolant layer 13, another propellant layer 14, containing five grams of propellant like that in the first layer 12, is packed on top. Finally, an eight gram layer 15 of coolant is provided over the propellant layer 14. The coolant 15 is preferably substantially the same as the first coolant layer 13. The propellant and coolant layers are preferably powders pressed in place at a pressure of less than about 5,000 psi.

The two propellant layers 12 and 14 are formed of a mixture of organic acid fuel powder and an oxidizer powder. The organic acid is in the form of a powder having a maximum average particle size less than about 15 microns. The oxidizer powder preferably has an average particle size less than about 25 microns and is selected from the class consisting of potassium chlorate, potassium perchlorate, sodium chlorate, and sodium perchlorate. If the particle size of the organic acid is too large, the effective surface area for reaction is reduced, and the rate of reaction may not be sufficient for producing gases fast enough for inflation of an air bag in an automobile passenger restraint system. The particle size of the oxidizer powder is preferably less than about 25 microns so that the reaction rate with the fuel is rapid, and the reaction is complete. If the particle size of the oxidizer is greater than about 25 microns, unreacted particles may be ejected with the gaseous reaction products.

It is particularly preferred that the oxidizer have an average particle size less than about 15 microns, and the organic acid have an average particle size less than about 5 microns in order to obtain a'very rapid reaction therebetween. Preferably, the particle size of the oxidizer and organic acid are about the same, that is, they do not differ from each other more than about percent so that thorough and intimate mixture of the particles is obtained without substantial segregation. Segregation of the organic acid and the oxidizer powder may lead to erratic burning or yield an incomplete reaction.

The preferred composition of propellant comprises about 32 percent by weight of citric acid and 68 percent by weight of potassium chlorate. The stoichiometric reaction between citric acid and potassium chlorate is C H Q, 3KClO 6C0 4H2O+ 3KCl and the stoichiometric proportion is 34 percent by weight of citric acid to 66 percent by weight of potassium chlorate. Thus, it will be seen that the preferred composition is 2 percent by weight rich in oxidizer as compared to the stoichiometric proportion. This composition has proved eminently successful in reducing the carbon monoxide level in the resultant gases to a very low value. This composition is preferred since it provides an optimum combination of low toxicity, cool gases, high reliability, rapid and reproducible burning rate, long term stability at 250F without degradation of performance, and low cost. The problem of rapidly, reliably, and safely inflating an automobile passenger restraint bag is severe, and limited variation in the preferred composition has been found. The requirement that the materials be aged together at 250F for 100 hours is severe and effectively eliminates most candidate materials. The required low carbon monoxide level and the requirement that gas temperatures into the bag be less than about 135F further reduce possible candidate compositions.

Citric acid is advantageous since it produces a substantial volume of gas with a relatively low heat of combustion. Thus, for example, to produce equal molar quantities of gas, combustion of citric acid produces only 81 percent as much heat as combustion of sucrose. For this reason, the temperature of gas reaching the passenger restraint bag can be lower.

Some variation in the quantity of citric acid is acceptable in compositions suitable for inflating an automobile passenger restraint bag. Thus, the citric acid concentration can be as low as about 25 percent by weight and still produce a commercially acceptable embodiment. Preferably, the citric acid proportion does not drop below about 25 percent by weight since lower proportions have an undesirably low total gas output. The principal proportion of gas produced by reaction of the citric acid and oxidizer derives from the citric.

acid, and undue reductions in its proportion requires an increased total quantity of propellant to provide sufficient gas for an automobile passenger restraint system.

Similarly, the citric acid proportion may be increased up to about 37 percent by weight in a commercially acceptable embodiment. If the citric acid is increased above about 37 percent by weight, the carbon monoxide level in the resultant gases increases unacceptably.

A few other organic acid powders may be used in practice of this invention including tartaric acid, tartronic acid and malonic acid. Tartaric acid which has the formula C H O reacts stoichiometricly with one and two-thirds mole of potassium chlorate to produce carbon dioxide, water vapor and potassium chloride. The stoichiometric proportion is 42 percent by weight of tartaric acid and 58 percent by weight of the oxidizer. The proportion may be decreased to about percent by weight of organic acid and 80 percent oxidizer powder with acceptable performance in a gas generator for inflation of an automotive passenger restraint bag. Preferably, such a mixture is about 5 percent below stoichiometry for the organic acid and correspondingly rich in the oxidizer for suppressing carbon monoxide formation.

Tartronic acid reacts stoichiometricly with one mole of potassium chlorate to produce carbon dioxide, water vapor and potassium chloride. The stoichiometric proportion is about 49.5v percent organic acid and 50.5 percent oxidizer. The proportion of tartronic acid may be reduced to about percent by weight with the oxidizer being present at about 75 percent by weight. Preferably, the composition is about 5 percent rich in oxidizer and correspondingly deficient in fuel for production of an excess of oxygen and suppression of carbon monoxide formation.

The stoichiometric reaction between malonic acid and potassium chlorate requires one and one-third moles of potassium chlorate for production of carbon dioxide and water vapor. This corresponds to about 36.7 percent by weight of the malonic acid and 63.3 percent by weight of the oxidizer. This proportion may be varied to about 20 percent by weight of malonic acid and percent by weight of oxidizer powder. Preferably, the composition is about 5 percent above stoichiometry in the oxidizer and about 5 percent deficient below stoichiometry for the organic acid.

It is particularly preferred to employ potassium chlorate as the oxidizing powder since the products of reaction include potassium chloride at a sufficiently high temperature that it is molten or possibly in vapor form. Such potassium chloride principally deposits in cooler portions of a gas generator system and while so doing, entraps particles which might otherwise reach the inflatable bag. Although potassium chlorate is more sensitive than potassium perchlorate in propellant compositions, no significant safety hazards associated with its use have been identified. If such sensitivity is a problem in some applications, potassium perchlorate may be used as the oxidizer powder within principles of this invention. Potassium perchlorate is not as effective as potassium chlorate in removing hot particles from the gas stream since its melting point is about 250C higher than the potassium chlorate. When potassium chlorate is used, it appears that a glassy layer forms on cooler surfaces (not shown) in the fluid passages leading from the gas generator cartridge to the inflatable bag. This glassy coating effectively traps particles from the gas generator cartridge and prevents them from reaching the inflatable bag. The sodium salts may be used but appear less capable of removing hot particles than the potassium salts.

Although the composition of the propellant has been stated as percent fuel and oxidizer, it should be understood that some dilution with endothermic decomposition coolant or the like can be employed. The present requirement for passenger restraint systems has a maximum carbon monoxide level of 750 ppm in the inflating gas. it has been found that up to about 5 percent by weight dilution of the propellant with zinc carbonate remains within that limit. If a higher level of carbon monoxide is acceptable, somewhat greater dilution can be used, for example, as high as about 25 percent. It is, therefore, to be understood that the proportions of fuel and oxidizer stated in the compositions are relative to each other and up to about 5 percent of other materials may be present in the mixture.

The coolant layers 13 and 15 are preferably a mixture in the range of from about 20 to 60 percent by weight of potassium chlorate and about 40 to 80 percent by weight of zinc carbonate, both of which materials endothermically decompose when the propellant is ignited, thereby producing a substantial volume of oxygen and carbon dioxide and cooling the gases from the propellant. The presence of potassium chlorate in the coolant produces substantial quantities of potassium chloride which, as mentioned hereinabove, forms a glassy deposit on the cooler walls, thereby trapping particles of zinc oxide and the like ejected from the coolant. The resultant high concentration of oxygen in the gas from the gas generator is a bonus that helps reduce toxicity and assure complete reaction of the organic acid. Some variation in the proportion of potassium chlorate in the coolant can be employed in practice of this invention. Thus, for example, if desired the potassium chlorate can be as high as about 90 percent by weight without substantially changing effectiveness of the gas generation. Similarly, potassium chlorate can be reduced to zero if desired; however, the beneficial oxygen is concomitantly decreased and the entrapment of zinc oxide powders partially sacrificed.

If desired, potassium perchlorate can be substituted for potassium chlorate in the coolant with some decrease in the formation of a glassy deposit within the gas generator, and hence less efficacious sweeping of hot particles from the gases. Similarly sodium chlorate and sodium perchlorate may be used.

Substitution for zinc carbonate can also be provided in the coolant, although this is a preferred material. Other suitable materials may be selected from the group consisting of magnesium carbonate, manganese carbonate, barium carbonate, calcium carbonate, potassium bicarbonate, hydrated magnesium carbonate, hydrated zirconium oxide, borax, and barium oxide octahydrate. If it is acceptable to have a caustic hydroxide as a possible reaction product, sodium carbonate and sodium bicarbonate are suitable coolants. The sodium oxides remaining from decomposition of sodium carbonate and sodium bicarbonate may combine with potassium chloride to form a slag that remains in the gas generator and causes no harm in the gas bag.

A variety of compositions have been tested for suitability for practice of this invention. Some of these tests have been in the nature of screening tests where the composition was burned and the reaction observed without utilizing the gases generated. Rate and completeness of reaction are observed in unconfined burning. Experience shows that compositions burning in the same manner as successful compositions in the unconfined screening tests will perform satisfactorily in bag inflation tests. Other compositions were placed in a confined gas generator and the gases used for inflating a fabric bag. The following compositions were tested in these manners:

. tartaric acid, 80% potassium chlorate tartaric acid, 70% potassium chlorate 38% tartaric acid, 62% potassium chlorate 42% tartaric acid, 58% potassium chlorate 46.5% tartaric acid, 53.5% potassium perchlorate 45% tartaric acid, potassium perchlorate 26.6% tartaric acid, 55.4% potassium chlorate, 18% zinc carbonate 8. 22.8% tartaric acid, 53.2% potassium chlorate, 24% zinc carbonate 9. 49.5% tartronic acid, 50.5% potassium chlorate 10. 36.7% malonic acid, 63.3% potassium chlorate 11. 34.3% citric acid, 66.7% potassium chlorate 12. 32% citric acid, 68% potassium chlorate 13. 25% citric acid, 75% potassium chlorate What is claimed is:

l. A method for inflating a gas bag comprising the steps of:

igniting a mixture consisting essentially of an organic acid powder selected from the group consisting of citric acid in the range of from about 25 to 37 percent by weight, tartaric acid in the range of from about 20 to 42 percent by weight, tartronic acid in the range of from about 25 to 49.5 percent by weight, and malonic acid in the range of from about 20 to 36.7 percent by weight, and an oxidizing powder selected from the class consisting of potassium chlorate, potassium perchlorate, sodium chlorate and sodium perchlorate; and

directing water vapor and carbon dioxide gas from the igniting step into a gas bag.

2. A method as defined in claim 1 further comprising suppressing formation of carbon monoxide by providing oxidizing powder in the mixture in a proportion about 5 percent higher than the stoichiometric proportion that produces substantially entirely carbon dioxide and water vapor as gaseous reaction products.

3. A method as defined in claim 2 further comprising the steps of:

cooling the products of the ignition reaction by contacting the reaction products with an endothermic decomposition coolant powder that decomposes to produce a gaseous decomposition product selected from the class consisting of carbon dioxide, oxygen and water vapor; and

directing the carbon dioxide, oxygen or water vapor from the cooling step into the gas bag.

4. A method for inflating a gas bag comprising the steps of:

igniting a mixture of citric acid in a proportion of from about 25 to 37 percent by weight and an oxidizing powder selected from the class consisting of potassium chlorate, potassium perchlorate, sodium chlorate, and sodium perchlorate; and

directing water vapor and carbon dioxide gas from the igniting step into a gas bag.

5. A method as defined in claim 4 wherein the oxidizer powder is potassium chlorate.

6. A method as defined in claim 10 further comprising the steps of:

cooling the products of the ignition reaction by contacting the reaction products with an endothermic decomposition coolant powder that decomposes to produce a gaseous decomposition product selected from the class consisting of carbon dioxide, oxygen, and water vapor; and

directing the carbon dioxide, oxygen or water vapor from the cooling step into the gas bag.

7. A method as defined in claim 6 wherein the coolant powder comprises up to about percent of potassium chlorate and a powder selected from the class consisting of magnesium carbonate, manganese carbonate, zinc carbonate, barium carbonate, calcium carbonate, potassium bicarbonate, hydrated magnesium carbonate, hydrated zirconium oxide, borax, and barium oxide octahydrate.

8. A method as defined in claim 6 wherein the coolant powder comprises up to about 60 percent by weight of potassium chlorate and a balance of zinc carbonate.

9. A method as defined in claim 6 wherein the cooling step is conducted partly remote from the igniting step by separating the mixture of citric acid and oxidizer powder from the coolant powder.

a a a UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE A CERTIFICATE OF ceEcTIoN January 15 1974 Patent No. 3 ,785 149 Dated Inventor s) Hubert G Timmerman It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Column 6, line 38, claim 6, "claim 10" should read ---Claim 4--.

Signed and sealed this 21st day of May 1974.

(SEAL) Attest:

EDWARD M.FLETCHER,JR. C. MARSHALL] DANN Attesting Officer Commissioner of Patents (5/69) s UNITED STATES PA TENT OFFICE A CERTIFICATE CORRECTION Patent No. r 3,785 ,149 Dated January 15 1974 InventorKs Hubert G. Timer-man It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Column 6 line 38, claim 6, "claim 10" should read ---Claim 4--.

Signed and sealed this 2l st day of May 1974.

(SEAL) Attes t:

EDWARD M.FLETCHER,-JR. C. MARSHALL DANN A ttesting Officer I Commissioner of Patents

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3532359 *Jul 22, 1968Oct 6, 1970Chrysler CorpInflatable device
US3618980 *Oct 31, 1969Nov 9, 1971Chrysler CorpTrap for nongaseous matter
US3618981 *Oct 31, 1969Nov 9, 1971Chrysler CorpInflatable device
US3647393 *May 11, 1970Mar 7, 1972Chrysler CorpGas-generating apparatus
US3653684 *Jun 18, 1970Apr 4, 1972Gen Motors CorpPressure vessel valve assembly
US3663035 *Jan 27, 1970May 16, 1972Ensign Bickford CoSelf-contained passenger restraining system
US3674059 *Oct 19, 1970Jul 4, 1972Allied ChemMethod and apparatus for filling vehicle gas bags
US3676234 *Dec 9, 1969Jul 11, 1972Commercial Solvents CorpExplosive slurry having constant detonation velocity over a wide temperature range
US3690695 *Aug 14, 1970Sep 12, 1972Jones Sr John LPersonnel restraint system for vehicular occupants
US3692495 *Jun 19, 1970Sep 19, 1972Thiokol Chemical CorpGas generator
US3711115 *Nov 24, 1970Jan 16, 1973Allied ChemPyrotechnic gas generator
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3865660 *Mar 12, 1973Feb 11, 1975Thiokol Chemical CorpNon-toxic, non-corrosive, odorless gas generating composition
US3964255 *Oct 17, 1973Jun 22, 1976Specialty Products Development CorporationMethod of inflating an automobile passenger restraint bag
US4128996 *Dec 5, 1977Dec 12, 1978Allied Chemical CorporationChlorite containing pyrotechnic composition and method of inflating an inflatable automobile safety restraint
US4152891 *Oct 11, 1977May 8, 1979Allied Chemical CorporationPyrotechnic composition and method of inflating an inflatable automobile safety restraint
US5401340 *Jan 10, 1994Mar 28, 1995Thiokol CorporationBorohydride fuels in gas generant compositions
US5429691 *Jan 5, 1994Jul 4, 1995Thiokol CorporationThermite compositions for use as gas generants comprising basic metal carbonates and/or basic metal nitrates
US5439537 *Aug 10, 1993Aug 8, 1995Thiokol CorporationThermite compositions for use as gas generants
US5486248 *May 31, 1994Jan 23, 1996Morton International, Inc.Extrudable gas generant for hybrid air bag inflation system
US5500059 *May 9, 1995Mar 19, 1996Thiokol CorporationAnhydrous 5-aminotetrazole gas generant compositions and methods of preparation
US5501823 *Dec 3, 1993Mar 26, 1996Thiokol CorporationPreparation of anhydrous tetrazole gas generant compositions
US5538278 *Jun 14, 1994Jul 23, 1996Ad Astram Enterprises, Inc.Ignition train apparatus for hybrid airbag inflators
US5567905 *Jan 30, 1996Oct 22, 1996Morton International, Inc.Gas generant compositions containing D 1-tartaric acid
US5586783 *Feb 23, 1995Dec 24, 1996Temic Bayern-Chemie Airbag GmbhHybrid gas generator for filling a gas bag
US5592812 *Feb 9, 1996Jan 14, 1997Thiokol CorporationMetal complexes for use as gas generants
US5670740 *Oct 6, 1995Sep 23, 1997Morton International, Inc.Heterogeneous gas generant charges
US5673935 *Jun 7, 1995Oct 7, 1997Thiokol CorporationMetal complexes for use as gas generants
US5682014 *Aug 2, 1993Oct 28, 1997Thiokol CorporationBitetrazoleamine gas generant compositions
US5725699 *Jul 26, 1995Mar 10, 1998Thiokol CorporationMetal complexes for use as gas generants
US5735118 *Aug 16, 1996Apr 7, 1998Thiokol CorporationUsing metal complex compositions as gas generants
US5738371 *Feb 16, 1996Apr 14, 1998Ad Astam Scientific, L.L.C.Hybrid airbag inflator
US6051158 *Jul 30, 1998Apr 18, 2000Autoliv Asp, Inc.Treatment of airbag inflation gases
US6076468 *Mar 26, 1998Jun 20, 2000Atlantic Research CorporationSolid propellant/water type hybrid gas generator
US6095559 *Jul 23, 1998Aug 1, 2000Autoliv Asp, Inc.Chemical cooling of airbag inflation gases
US6481746Nov 7, 1996Nov 19, 2002Alliant Techsystems Inc.Metal hydrazine complexes for use as gas generants
US6558487 *Jul 24, 2001May 6, 2003The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The ArmySmoke generating compositions and methods of making the same
US6685223 *Feb 5, 2001Feb 3, 2004Automotive Systems Laboratory, Inc.Airbag release aid
US6969435Feb 18, 1998Nov 29, 2005Alliant Techsystems Inc.Metal complexes for use as gas generants
US7134690Jan 22, 2004Nov 14, 2006Automotive Systems Laboratories, Inc.Airbag release aid
US7959749 *Jun 14, 2011Tk Holdings, Inc.Gas generating composition
US8784585Jun 30, 2006Jul 22, 2014Tk Holdings Inc.Autoignition compositions
US9046327Sep 29, 2008Jun 2, 2015Tk Holdings Inc.Gas generator
US9073512Jul 23, 2013Jul 7, 2015Tk Holdings Inc.Gas generating system with gas generant cushion
US9199886Dec 4, 2009Dec 1, 2015Orbital Atk, Inc.Metal complexes for use as gas generants
US20040150201 *Jan 22, 2004Aug 5, 2004Takasi FurusawaAirbag release aid
US20050067074 *Jul 15, 2004Mar 31, 2005Hinshaw Jerald C.Metal complexes for use as gas generants
US20060220362 *Mar 30, 2006Oct 5, 2006Hordos Deborah LGas generator
US20070034307 *Jul 31, 2006Feb 15, 2007Hordos Deborah LAutoignition/booster composition
US20070044675 *Aug 31, 2005Mar 1, 2007Burns Sean PAutoignition compositions
US20070084532 *Oct 2, 2006Apr 19, 2007Burns Sean PGas generant
US20070113940 *Jun 30, 2006May 24, 2007Burns Sean PAutoignition compositions
US20070169863 *Jan 19, 2007Jul 26, 2007Hordos Deborah LAutoignition main gas generant
US20070175553 *Jan 31, 2007Aug 2, 2007Burns Sean PGas Generating composition
US20080149232 *Dec 17, 2007Jun 26, 2008Jason NewellGas generant compositions
US20080271825 *Jul 7, 2008Nov 6, 2008Halpin Jeffrey WGas generant
US20090008003 *Jul 2, 2008Jan 8, 2009Burns Sean PGas generant
US20090102171 *Sep 29, 2008Apr 23, 2009Hordos Deborah LGas generator
US20100084060 *Apr 8, 2010Alliant Techsystems Inc.Metal complexes for use as gas generants
US20100326575 *Jan 29, 2007Dec 30, 2010Miller Cory GSynthesis of 2-nitroimino-5-nitrohexahydro-1,3,5-triazine
EP0691317A2 *Jun 9, 1995Jan 10, 1996TEMIC Bayern-Chemie Airbag GmbHNon-azide gas generant formulations
EP0763511A2 *Sep 5, 1996Mar 19, 1997Morton International, Inc.Igniter compositions for non-azide gas generants
EP0779260A2Dec 12, 1996Jun 18, 1997Morton International, Inc.Fuel compositions for use in hybrid inflators containing stored oxidizing gas
EP0787702A1Jan 30, 1997Aug 6, 1997Morton International, Inc.Gas generant compositions containing d,l-tartaric acid
WO1995034448A1 *Jun 12, 1995Dec 21, 1995Ad Astram Enterprises, Inc.Improved ignition train apparatus for hybrid airbag inflators
WO1998018661A1Oct 15, 1997May 7, 1998Atlantic Research CorporationAutoignition propellant containing superfine iron oxide and method of lowering the autoignition temperature of an igniter
WO2000006424A1 *Jul 27, 1999Feb 10, 2000Autoliv Asp, Inc.Treatment of airbag inflation gases
WO2001056833A2 *Feb 5, 2001Aug 9, 2001Automotive Systems Laboratory, Inc.Airbag release aid
WO2001056833A3 *Feb 5, 2001Sep 4, 2003Automotive Systems LabAirbag release aid
Classifications
U.S. Classification60/205, 149/83, 102/531, 422/164, 280/741
International ClassificationC06B29/00, B60R21/264, B60R21/26, C06D5/00, C06B29/04, C06D5/06
Cooperative ClassificationC06D5/06, C06B29/04, B60R2021/2648, B60R21/2644
European ClassificationC06B29/04, C06D5/06, B60R21/264C
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jul 23, 1990ASAssignment
Owner name: HBB LIMITED PARTNERSHIP, 2300 SHERIDAN RD., HIGHLA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:LYNCH, ROBERT W.;REEL/FRAME:005552/0258
Owner name: HBB LIMITED PARTNERSHIP, ILLINOIS
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:GALLO, MICHELE;REEL/FRAME:005383/0612
Effective date: 19900428
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:CALABRIA, JOSEPH;REEL/FRAME:005383/0545
Effective date: 19900426
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:CATANZARITE, VINCENT;REEL/FRAME:005383/0560
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:GIATTINO, LOUIS R.;REEL/FRAME:005383/0511
Effective date: 19900430
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:TIMMERMAN, HUBERT;REEL/FRAME:005383/0549
Effective date: 19900427
Jul 23, 1990AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: HBB LIMITED PARTNERSHIP, 2300 SHERIDAN RD., HIGHLA
Effective date: 19900430
Owner name: LYNCH, ROBERT W.
Feb 6, 1990ASAssignment
Owner name: FIRST WISCONSIN NATIONAL BANK OF MILWAUKEE, WISCON
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:SPECIALTY PRODUCTS DEVELEOPMENT CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:005236/0946
Effective date: 19900118
Owner name: HBB LIMITED PARTNERSHIP, AN ILLINOIS LIMITED PARTN
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:FIRST WISCONSIN NATIONAL BANK OF MILWAUKEE;REEL/FRAME:005236/0949
Effective date: 19900119
Feb 6, 1990AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: FIRST WISCONSIN NATIONAL BANK OF MILWAUKEE
Owner name: HBB LIMITED PARTNERSHIP, 2300 SHERIDAN ROAD, HIGHL
Effective date: 19900119