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Publication numberUS3785483 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 15, 1974
Filing dateJun 9, 1972
Priority dateJun 9, 1972
Publication numberUS 3785483 A, US 3785483A, US-A-3785483, US3785483 A, US3785483A
InventorsSillay R
Original AssigneeCelanese Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Stable fiber package comprising overlying wraps of a fibrous tape
US 3785483 A
Abstract
An improved fiber package is provided wherein a dry fibrous tape is wound upon a rigid support and each overlying wrap is separated from the previous wrap by an interlay. The interlay employed in the formation of the improved fiber package possesses a stiff backing and a resilient contact surface which engages the fibrous tape having a corrugated configuration consisting of a plurality of parallel ridges substantially coextensive with the length of the interlay. The fibrous tape preferably is composed of a carbonaceous fibrous material (e.g. a graphitic carbon fibrous material). The fiber package possesses enchanced stability, and is resistant to telescoping. The fibrous tape may be conveniently stored within and unreeled from the package in the absence of fiber damage.
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United States Patent [191 Sillay Jan. 15, 1974 STABLE FIBER PACKAGE COMPRISING OVERLYING WRAPS OF A FIBROUS TAPE [75] Inventor: Roy S. Sillay, Cumberland, Md.

[73] Assignee: Celanese Corporation, New York,

[22] Filed: June 9, 1972 [21] App]. N0.: 261,462

Primary Examiner-Leonard Summer [57] ABSTRACT An improved fiber package is provided wherein a dry fibrous tape is wound upon a rigid support and each overlying wrap is separated from the previous wrap by an interlay. The interlay employed in the formation of the improved fiber package possesses a stiff backing and a resilient contact surface which engages the fibrous tape having a corrugated configuration consisting of a plurality of parallel ridges substantially coextensive with the length of the interlay. The fibrous tape preferably is composed of a carbonaceous fibrous material (e.g. a graphitic carbon fibrous material). The fiber package possesses enchanced stability, and is resistant to telescoping. The fibrous tape may be conveniently stored within and unreeled from the package in the absence of fiber damage.

15 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures STABLE FIBER PACKAGE COMPRISING OVERLYING WRAPS OF A FIBROUS TAPE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION In many areas of fiber technology fiber packages of a dry fibrous tape are handled and utilized.

For instance, in recent years fiber reinforced composite structures have achieved increasing acceptance. More specifically, polymer fibers as well as numerous inorganic fibrous materials, such as glass fibers, carbon fibers, boron fibers, silicon carbide fibers, aluminum silicate fibers, metallic fibers (e.g. stainless steel fibers), etc., have been incorporated in various matrix materials to provide reinforcement, and to produce composite articles. The matrix material has commonly been a thermoplastic or a thermosetting resinous material. Also, in some instances, metals have served as the matrix material.

As the fiber reinforced composite technology has de veloped, increasing demands have been presented for fibrous reinforcement in tape form having an appreciable length. Such relatively long lengths of fibrous material find particular use in filament winding composite formation techniques. In order to store and transport such long lengths of fibrous material prior to composite formation, it has proven convenient to wind the same upon a support, such as a bobbin or reel to form a fiber package.

However, difficulties have commonly arisen with respect to the quality of the fiber packages. For instance,

- it is important that substantially uniform tension be maintained across the width of the dry tape while present within the package so that it can be uniformly unwound from the package and passed directly to a tapelaying machine where it is resin impreganted and subse quently formed into a composite article. Paper interlays have been utilized in an attempt to separate adjoining wraps and to thereby attempt to maintain uniform tension across a given wrap within the package. There has been a marked tendency, however, for the contents of the package to telescope upon handling if the above objectiveis achieved particularly if formed of .a fiber tape possessing natural lubricity, such as graphitic carbon. Also, there has been a tendency for the filaments within the fibrous material to be damaged at those locations where fiber cross-overs occur within the package.

An improved fiber package is claimed in commonly assigned U.S. Ser. No. 124,077, filed Mar. 15, 1971 of Michael J. Ram and Thomas K. Reynolds entitled Improved Fiber Package Comprising Overlying Wraps of a Fibrous Tape, issued as U.S. Pat. No. 3,732,974 on May 15, 1973.

It is an object of the invention to provide an improved fiber package comprising a continuous length of a dry tape of a fibrous material wound upon a rigid support.

It is an object of the invention to provide a fiber package of enhanced stability wherein a continuous length of a dry tape of an inorganic fibrous material is wound upon a rigid support.

It is an object of the invention to provide an improved fiber package comprising a continuous length of a dry tape ofa carbonaceous fibrous material wound upon a rigid support.

It is an object of the invention to provide a fiber package which is resistant to telescoping wherein a continuous length of a dry tape of a fibrous material is wound upon a rigid support.

It is another object of the invention to provide an improved fiber package wherein substantially uniform tension is maintained across a tape ofa fibrous material which is wound upon a rigid support.

It is another object of the invention to provide a stable package of a tape of a fibrous material wherein the single filament properties of the fibers present therein are substantially unimpaired.

It is a further object of the invention to provide a fiber package wherein a fibrous tape component thereof may be removed therefrom in the absence of substantial damage or loss of stability.

These and other objects, as well as the scope, nature, and utilization of the invention will be apparent from the following detailed description and appended claims.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION It has been found that in a fiber package comprising (a) a rigid support means, (b) a continuous length of a dry tape of a fibrous material wound in a plurality of overlying wraps about the support means, and (c) a continuous length of an interlay provided in a contiguous arrangement to the tape capable of eliminating contact between adjacent overlying wraps of the tape; that improved results are achieved if a continuous length of an interlay is provided having a stiff backing and a resilient tape contact surface adjacent one side of the stiff backing having a corrugated configuration comprising a plurality of parallel ridges substantially coextensive with the length ofthe interlay, with the stiff backing being capable of preventing substantial transverse deformation of the interlay within the package and the resilient corrugated tape contact surface being capable of substantially non-deleterious engagement with the tape to form a package of increased stability.

The package of the present invention is particularly suited for handling tapes of dry carbonaceous fibers (e.g. graphitic carbon fibers).

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a fiber package in accordance with the present invention wherein a graphitic carbon tape is being wound in a plurality of overlying wraps upon a flanged bobbin.

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary perspective view greatly enlarged of a preferred interlay for use in forming a fiber package in accordance with the present invention wherein the backing thereof is Kraft paper and the resilient corrugated tape contact surface thereof is tissue paper.

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary perspective view greatly enlarged ofa preferred interlay for use in forming a fiber package in accordance with the present invention wherein the backing thereof is Kraft paper and the resilient corrugated tape contact surface thereof is polyurethane foam.

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary perspective view greatly enlarged of the interlay of FIG. 2 showing a tape comprising a plurality of substantially parallel continuous multifilament yarn bundles of a carbonaceous fibrous material disposed thereon.

DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS The nature of the rigid support upon which the dry tape of a fibrous material is wound to form the fiber package of the present invention may be varied widely. Illustrative examples of preferred supports are bobbins, reels, spools, etc. In a particularly preferred embodiment the rigid support is a flanged bobbin or reel which is provided with a central opening capable of receiving an expandable chuck positioned upon the terminus of a variably controlled rotating shaft. The flanges of such a bobbin may be either permanently fixed or removable. For instance, frictionally engaging transparent flanges may be provided upon the bobbin while the tape is being wound upon the package which are subsequently replaced by conventional flanges once the package is formed. Such transparent flanges enable the operator to readily observe the progress of the tape winding while forming the package. The tape and interlay (described hereafter) may be initially secured to the rigid support (e.g. to its transverse axis) by any convenient technique, such as by use of an adhesive tape, glue, etc., or by an integral clamp provided upon the support.

The dry tape of fibrous material which is provided within the package of the present invention is in the form of a ribbon having an appreciable length, a substantially uniform width, and a substantially uniform thickness. The term dry tape is used herein to define a tape which has not previously undergone resin impregnation (i.e. preimpregnation) wherein a substantial portion ofa resin which is to ultimately serve as the matrix of a composite article is adhering thereto. Accordingly, the surfaces of the tape are non-tacky when wound in the package. The tapes may, however, optionally be coated with a solid dry non-tacky coating (e.g., a dry resin coating) designed to serve as a finish, size, surface modifier, etc. The width and thickness of the tape are not critical provided the tape is flexible and may be wound in overlying wraps upon a support. Tape widths commonly range from about 0.5 to 8 inches, or more, and tape thicknesses commonly range from about .003 to 0.10 inch. The length of the tape is largely governed by the capacity of the rigid support upon which the tape is wound.

The fibrous tapes may be composed of organic or inorganic fibrous materials and may be formed by conventional techniques which will be apparent to those skilled in the art. The tapes are commonly formed from fibrous materials utilized in the formation of fiber rein-' forced composites. For instance, the fibrous material may be a carbonaceous fibrous material which contains at least about 90 per cent carbon by weight (preferably at least about 95 per cent carbon by weight). such carbonaceous fibrous materials may be formed from either amorphous carbon or graphitic carbon. The particularly preferred inorganic fibrous material is a carbonaceous fibrous material which contains at least about 95 per cent carbon by weight and exhibits a predominantly graphitic X-ray diffraction diffraction pattern. Other representative inorganic fibrous tapes are those formed from glass fiber, boron carbide fiber, silicon carbide fiber, aluminum silicate fiber, and metallic fiber (e.g. stainless steel fiber). Representative organic fibrous tapes include those formed from acrylic polymers, polyolefins, polyesters, polyamides, cellulosics, etc.

In a preferred embodiment the fibrous tapes comprise a plurality of adjoining substantially parallel multifilament yarn bundles substantially coextensive with the length of the tape. Such bundles may optionally possess a twist to improve their handling characteristics, e.g. a twist of about 0.1 to 5 tpi (turns per inch). If desired, a transverse weft pick may be interlaced with the yarn bundles to produce a woven tape of enhanced lateral integrity. Preferred tapes are disclosed in commonly assigned U. S. Ser. No. 112,189 filed Feb. 3, 1971, of Kenneth S. Burns, George R. Ferment. and Roger C. Waugh entitled Improved Process for the Production of Carbonaceous Tapes which is herein incorporated by reference. Alternatively, the tapes may consist simply of substantially parallel contiguous fiber bundles in ribbon form which include no transverse interlacement. Also, the tapes may be provided as a multifilament flat tow, or in other woven or non-woven fibrous assemblages.

The continuous length of an interlay employed in the package of the invention possesses a stiff backing and a resilient tape contact surface secured to one side of the stiff backing having a corrugated configuration comprising a plurality of parallel ridges substantially coextensive with the length of the interlay. Situated between each pair of adjoining resilient ridges is an elongated groove or valley substantially coextensive with the length of the interlay. The stiff backing is capable of preventing substantial transverse deformation of the interlay within the package, and the resilient corrugated tape contact surface is capable of a substantially non-deleterious cushioning engagement with the tape to form a package of increased stability which is resistant to telescoping. Since the interlay substantially resists transverse deformation or deflection within the package, differential tensions along the length of the tape and across the tape are effectively avoided which result if a portion of the tape is allowed to settle to a non-uniform degree into the interior of the package. The maintenance of uniform tension within a tape package is of prime importance if the tape is to ultimately serve as an organic polymeric fibrous precursor tape which is converted to a carbonaceous fibrous material in a thermal conversion process wherein tension is controlled. Also, if the tape within the package is to be ultimately utilized in a filament winding composite formation technique (e.g. following resin impregnation), uniform tension within the tape influences the quality of the ultimate product. For instance, in areas where relatively low tension is exerted upon a tape roping of adjoining fiber bundles, or separation of adjoining fiber bundles may occur. Additionally, damage resulting to the tape at fiber cross-over points while wound within the package is substantially eliminated since the tape is in contact with the resilient surface of the interlay.

The interlay is at least as wide as the fibrous tape, and the interlay is preferably provided in a slightly wider width than the tape, e.g. the intelay is 0.1 to 0.5 inch, or more, wider than the tape.

The backing of the interlay comprises at least one sheet ofa relatively stiff stock material which possesses sufficient longitudinal flexibility to undergo smooth winding upon the rigid support. For instance, the backing may be conveniently formed from stiff paper; plastic sheeting such as cellulose acetate, polyethylene, etc; or metal sheeting such as aluminum foil, etc. A particularly preferred backing is Kraft paper of about 20 to weight. The thickness of the backing is influenced by the relative stiffness of the material selected. Commonly interlay backings are selected having a thickness of about 0.001 to 0.004 inch.

The corrugated resilient tape contact surface of the interlay may be formed from a variety of materials. I]- lustrative contact surfaces include soft resilient paper, and soft resilient resinous materials. An example of a soft resilient paper is tissue paper. An example of a soft resinous material is a resilient solid foam, such as a polyurethane foam, and the like. The lateral width of each resilient ridge present in the contact surface is commonly about 0.1 to 0.5 inch. The maximum thickness of the soft corrugated contact surface can be varied, and commonly the contact surface has a thickness of about 0.002 to 0.08 inch at each ridge, and a thickness at the groove area of about one fifth to three fifths of that of the adjacent ridge area. The lateral width of each groove present in the contact surface is commonly about one fifth to four fifths of that of each ridge present in the contact surface. The soft resilient nature of the corrugated contact surface eliminates sliding or telescoping of a tape which is wound in a package adjacent the interlay.

The corrugated resilient contact surface of the interlay is integrally bonded to one surface of the backing which simplifies handling during package formation. For instance, the corrugated resilient contact surface may be caused to adhere to one side of the backing by means of an adhesive, or through the use of heat bonding when the resilient contact surface is a resinous material. Additionally, embossing techniques may be utilized to form an integral interlay having the desired resilient alternating ridge and groove configuration.

With reference to FIG. 1 a fiber package 1 in accordance with the present invention is shown during its formation. A flanged bobbin serves as the rigid support. The bobin flanges 2 and 4 have a diameter of 12 inches, and are positioned upon a transverse axis 6 having a diameter of 6 inches. The flanges 2 and 4 are spaced 3.5 inches apart. A central opening 8 is provided within the center of transverse axis 6 and is engaged by a rotating expandable chuck (not shown). The interlay has a width of 3.5 inches and consists of resilient corrugated tape contact surface 14 and stiff backing 16, and is discussed below in connection with FIG. 2. The dry fibrous tape 12 has a width of 3 inches and consists of 300 substantially parallel multifilament carbonaceous yarn bundles each having a twist of 0.5 tpi. Each bundle consists of about 400 continuous filaments having a denier per filament of about 0.7. The tape consists of in excess of 99 per cent carbon by weight and exhibits a predominantly graphitic X-ray diffraction pattern. As the interlay l0 and tape 12 are wrapped upon the support in overlying the superimposed wraps a stable package is formed in the absence of fiber damage.

With reference to FIG. 2 the interlay consists of a stiff backing 20 of 30 weight Kraft paper having a thickness about 0.002 inch, and a resilient contact surface 22 bonded thereto consisting of corrugated tissue paper having a maximum ridge thickness 24 of about 0.02 inch and a minimum groove thickness 26 of about 0.008 inch.

With refernece to FIG. 3 the interlay consists of a stiff backing 30 of 30 weight Kraft paper, having a thickness of about 0.002 inch and a resilient corrugated contact surface of polyurethane foam 32 having a maximum ridge thickness 34 of about 0.02 inch and a minimum groove thickness 36 of about 0.008 inch. The corrugated foam contact surface is caused to adhere to the inner core 30 by means of flame lamination.

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of the interlay of FIG. 2 showing a tape comprising a plurality of substantially parallel continuous multifilament yarn bundles 12 of a carbonaceous fibrous material disposed thereon.

Although the invention has been described with preferred embodiments, it is to be understood that variations and modifications may be resorted to as will be apparent to those skilled in the art. Such variations and modifications are to be considered within the purview and scope of the claims appended hereto.

I claim:

ll. In a fiber package comprising (a) a rigid support means, (b) a continuous length of a dry tape of a fbrous material wound in a plurality of overlying wraps about said support means, and (c) a continuous length of an interlay provided in a contiguous arrangement to said tape capable of eliminating contact between adjacent overlying wraps of said tape; the improvement of providing in said package a continuous length of an interlay having a stiff backing and a resilient tape contact surface provided adjacent one side of said stiff backing having a preformed corrugated configuration comprising a plurality of parallel ridges substantially coextensive with the length of said interlay, with said stiff backing being capable of preventing substantial transverse deformation of said interlay within said package and said resilient corrugated tape contact surface being capable of substantially non-deleterious engagement with said tape to form a package of increased stability.

2. A fiber package in accordance with claim 1 wherein said support means a is a flanged bobbin.

3. A fiber package in accordance with claim 1 wherein said continuous length of dry tape b comprises a plurality of substantially parallel continuous multifilament yarn bundles substantially coextensive with the length of said tape.

4. A fiber package in accordance with claim 3 wherein said yarn bundles include a twist of about 0.1 to 5 tpi.

5. A fiber package in accordance with claim 1 wherein said continuous length of dry tape b is a multifilament tow.

6. A fiber package in accordance with claim 1 wherein said fibrous material of said dry tape b is a carbonaceous fibrous material which contains at least about per cent carbon by weight.

7. A fiber package in accordance with claim 1 wherein said dry tape of fibrous material b is a carbonaceous fibrous material which contains at least about per cent carbon by weight and exhibits a predominantly graphitic X-ray diffraction pattern.

8. A fiber package in accordance with claim 1 wherein said interlay c comprises a backing of stiff paper and a resilient corrugated tape contact surface of tissue paper.

9. A fiber package in accordance with claim 1 wherein said interlay c comprises a backing of stiff paper and a resilient corrugated tape contact surface of resilient solid foam.

10. In a fiber package comprising a a rigid support means, b a continuous length of a dry tape comprising a plurality of substantially parallel continuous multifilament yarn bundles of a carbonaceous fibrous material which contains at least about 90 per cent carbon by weight substantially coextensive with the length of said tape wound in a plurality of overlying wraps about said support means, and c a continuous length of an interlay provided in a contiguous arrangement to said tape capable of eliminating contact between adjacent overlying wraps of said tape; the improvement of providing in said package a continuous length on an interlay having a stiff backing a resilient tape contact surface provided adjacent one side of said stiff backing having a preformed corrugated configuration comprising a plurality of parallel ridges substantially coextensive with the length of said interlay, with said stiff backing being capable of preventing substantial transverse deformation of said interlay within said package and said resilient corrugated tape contact surface being capable of substantially non-deleterious engagement with said tape to form a package of increased stability.

11. A fiber package in accordance with claim 10 wherein said dry tape b is of a carbonaceous fibrous material which contains at least about per cent carbon by weight and exhibits a predominantly graphitic X-ray diffraction pattern.

12. A fiber package in accordance with claim 10 wherein said yarn bundles include a twist of about 0.1 to 5 tpi.

13. A fiber package in accordance with claim 10 wherein said continuous length of dry tape b is a multifilament tow.

14. A fiber package in accordance with claim 10 wherein said interlay c comprises a backing of stiff paper and a resilient corrugated tape contact surface of tissue paper.

15. A fiber package in accordance with claim 10 wherein said interlay c comprises a backing of stiff paper and a resilient corrugated tape contact surface of resilient solid foam.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1781797 *Mar 22, 1927Nov 18, 1930Harrison R WilliamsProcess of making packing material and product
US3390762 *May 22, 1967Jul 2, 1968Canadian IndMethod of winding thermoplastic resin sheeting into rolls and rolls obtained thereby
US3732974 *Mar 15, 1971May 15, 1973Celanese CorpFiber package comprising overlying wraps of a fibrous tape
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5749537 *Nov 7, 1995May 12, 1998Lydall, Inc.Method of wrapping cryogenic insulation around an inner cryogenic tank
US6543711 *Apr 9, 2001Apr 8, 2003Nitto Denko CorporationDamper continuous feeding body
US7121720 *Jul 14, 2003Oct 17, 2006Braun GmbhProtective cap for infrared radiation thermometer
US20110233320 *Nov 13, 2009Sep 29, 2011Jx Nippon Mining & Metals CorporationMethod of winding up copper foil or copper clad laminate
WO1997017149A1 *Nov 4, 1996May 15, 1997Lydall IncMethod of wrapping cryogenic insulation around an inner cryogenic tank
Classifications
U.S. Classification242/160.4, 206/417, 242/530.2, 242/160.3, 206/412
International ClassificationB65D85/67, B65D85/672
Cooperative ClassificationB65D85/672
European ClassificationB65D85/672
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jan 2, 1987ASAssignment
Owner name: BASF AKTIENGESELLSCHAFT, D-6700 LUDWIGSHAFEN, GERM
Owner name: SUBJECT TO AGREEMENT RECITED SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:BASF STRUCTURAL MATERIALS INC.;REEL/FRAME:004718/0001
Effective date: 19860108
May 23, 1986ASAssignment
Owner name: INMONT CORPORATION
Free format text: MERGER;ASSIGNORS:NARMCO MATERIALS, INC.;QUANTUM, INCORPORATED;CCF, INC.;REEL/FRAME:004580/0870
Effective date: 19860417
Apr 10, 1986ASAssignment
Owner name: BASF STRUCTURAL MATERIALS, INC., 1501 STEELE CREEK
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:INMONT CORPORATION, A CORP. OF DE.;REEL/FRAME:004540/0948
Effective date: 19851231
Jun 10, 1985ASAssignment
Owner name: CCF, INC.,
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:CELANESE CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:004413/0650
Effective date: 19850510