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Publication numberUS3785638 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 15, 1974
Filing dateAug 31, 1971
Priority dateJan 26, 1970
Publication numberUS 3785638 A, US 3785638A, US-A-3785638, US3785638 A, US3785638A
InventorsBeazley A
Original AssigneeFarah Mfg Co Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fabric pickup and transfer device
US 3785638 A
Abstract
A pick-up and transfer device is provided which holds fabric workpieces in a stacked relationship, separates and picks up the workpieces individually by means of an adhesive tape, if needed in an inverted face-up or face-down relationship, transfers the workpieces from a lower position to an upper position, and advances the individual workpieces to subsequent garment forming devices.
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United States Patent 1191 Beazley 51 Jan. 15, 1974 [5 FABRIC PICKUP AND TRANSFER DEVICE 1,888,194 11/1932 Broadmeyer 271/27 2,767,982 10/1956 Noon 271/27 X [75] invent Aubrey Beazley P 3,079,145 2/1963 Grosnickle eta1..... 271/62 R 73 Assignee; F h Manufacturing Company 3,369,803 2/ 1968 Walton et a1. 271/39 X hm El Paso Tex. 3,572,686 3 1971 Day 271/27 3,580,564 5/1971 Boynton et a1. 271/33 [22] Filed: Aug. 31, 1971 21 A 1 N 2 176,606 Primary Examiner-Evon C. Blunk 1 pp 0 Assistant Examiner-Bruce H. Stoner, Jr.

Related Application Data Attorney-Henry W. Koster et a1. [63] Continuation-impart of Ser. No. 5,809, Jan. 26,

1970, Pat. No. 3,611,957. ABSTRACT 52 11.8. c1 271/33, 271/97, 271/118, A P p and transfer device is Provided which holds 271 [15 5 fabric workpieces in a stacked relationship, separates 511 1m. 01 B65h 3/20 and picks p the workpieces n i i lly y mean of [58] Field of Search 271/33, 27, 28, DIG. 2, an adhesive tape, if needed in an inverted '"P I 271 2 R, 39 3 4Q face-down relationship, transfers the workpieces from a lower position to an upper position, and advances 5 R f r n Cited the individual workpieces to subsequent garment UNITED STATES PATENTS formmg 552,122 12/1895 Goodbar 271/33 6 Claims, 11 Drawing Figures minim 15 mm 3,785,638

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1 FABRIC PICKUP AND TRANSFER DEVICE This application is a continuation-in-part of copending application Ser. No. 5,809 filed on Jan. 26, 1970 and now U. S. Pat. No. 3,611,957 issued on Oct. 12, 1971.

This invention relates to an apparatus for picking up and transferring fabric workpieces, and more particularly, to an apparatus with an adhesive tape pick up which contacts a workpiece at a lower position by adhesion to the tape and rotates about a horizontal axis to transfer the workpiece from a lower position to an upper position.

In the production of garments, such as mens pants, almost endlessly repetitive sewing operations are required for a competitive manufacture of these garments. Thus, for example, in the manufacture of pants, the back pockets of pants are fashioned from a pocket blank which undergoes a number of manufacturing steps until it is incorporated into the finished pants article. During the manufacturing process, there is a need to transfer the pocket blanks from one position to another. For example, as illustrated in the aboveidentified patent there is the need to transfer each pocket blank individually from a lower pocket blank supply to an upper pocket blank feeding means so that each blank may be processed separately.

Several problems must be met in properly supplying fabric workpieces to a garment forming machine. For example, fabric workpieces often tend to stick together. The prior devices for separating and transferring fabric workpieces, however, share a common disadvantage of overcomplexity for the functions performed. The present invention, however, provides a simple and uncomplicated means for pick up, transfer and advancement of fabric workpieces.

In accordance with the present invention, a novel pick up and transfer device is provided which holds fabric workpieces in a stacked relationship, separates and picks up the workpieces individually, transfers the workpieces from a lower position to an upper position and advances the individual workpieces to subsequent garment forming devices. Thus, an adhesive tape is provided which extends over guide means on a rotatable unit of the device and this tape is advanced by means of properly provided gear train from one reel on the device to another so that a fresh portion of the tape is used for each pick up and transfer. A workpiece is brought into contact with the tape by means of a workpiece support table which raises all the stacked workpieces until the top workpiece contacts the tape. After contact is made, air jets are utilized to aid in separating the top workpiece from the adjacent workpiece in the stack as the stack is lowered. The tape, thus holding a single workpiece, is rotated about a horizontal axis to bring the workpiece to an upper position. During this transfer, air jets are used to aid in holding the workpiece against the transfer device. The combination of adhesive pickup properly formed support surface for the workpiece, and the use of air jets provides a reliable method of workpiece separation and insures that contact between the workpiece and transfer device continues until the workpiece is separated from the transfer device by a puller wheel at the upper position.

IN THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 shows an isometric view of a pocket blank forming machine utilizing the unique pick up and transfer device of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is an isometric view of the single ply pick up and transfer device of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 shows a section 33 of the single ply pick up and transfer device of FIG. 2;

FIG. 3a, 3b and 3c show the transfer device in three positions in the transfer sequence of a single fabric ply;

FIG. 4 is a side view of the single ply pick up and transfer device with associated mechanism, air tubes and switch means as well as a stack of work plies;

FIG. 5 is a partial front view in section illustrating the pick up and transfer device mechanism associated with the advance and pick up of an adhesive tape used as the fabric pick up means;

FIG. 6 is a section view on lines 6-6 of FIG. 5 illustrating the gearing associated with the pick up means;

FIG. 7 is a top view of the pick up and transfer device of FIG. 2 with the means associated with adhesive tape pick up of the fabric ply removed; and,

FIG. 8 is an electrical control circuit for the single ply pick up and transfer device.

A complete pocket forming machine is shown in FIG. l. The functions and operational sequence of this machine are fully described in the previously identified copending application. The functions essentially consist of simultaneously feeding a pocket blank from a transfer device 40 toward asewing machine unit 130 and feeding a facing patch from a twist pick-up device 29 toward a mating device 100. The mating device places and facing patch on the pocket blank whereupon the patch and blank are sewn together by sewing unit 130. Thereafter, the work blank with facing patch attached is removed from the sewing machine area by a rake device 180. Next, the pocket blank is conveyed to a patch facing folder device 200 and thereafter sent through a pocket blank sideedge folding and pressing device 250. After the edge of the pocket blank has been folded, the pocket blank is conveyed to a pocket folder device 330 which folds the pocket blank over itself. At this point, the folded pocket blank is removed from the machine by a stacking device 370. The portion of this pocket blank forming machine comprising the transfer device 40 will now be described in greater detail.

Device 40, shown in FIGS. 2 through 7, includes a workpiece support table 41 which holds a stack 72 of die cut or otherwise cut fabric workpieces. Support table 41 is supported by racks 42 which are driven vertically by pinions 43 mounted on shaft 76 driven by motor 46. The racks 42 are guided and held from lateral movement by rack guides 44, i.e., low friction roller bearings. When motor 46 is activated, it rotates shaft 76 thereby lifting table 41 upwardly. This upward movement is assisted by a spring 45 which is attached to the lower end of one rack 42. The upward motion continues until the top workpiece on stack 72 contacts a tape 49.

Tape 49 is held in a single ply pickup and transfer unit 47 which is rotated in a clockwise direction (as viewed in FIGS. 3a-3c3c) by a motor 48. The housing 59 of transfer unit 47 is rigidly attached to a sleeve 50. Sleeve 50 is fitted over an inner, fixed shaft 51 having a worm gear 53 attached at one end. Worm gear 53 is mated to a gear 54 which extends through a cut-out portion 52 of sleeve 50 and is rotatably held in housing 59. As sleeve 50 is rotated relative to shaft 51, gear 54 follows worm gear 53 and thereby rotates. Gear 54 is fixedly attached to a pinion gear 55 which drives a tape take-up reel gear 56 which is supported in housing 59 by a shaft 56a. A tape take-up reel 56b is connected at the end of shaft 56a opposite gear 56. As gear 56 is driven during the rotation of housing 59, tape 49 is advanced from a tape supply reel 57 over the guide roller 58 and onto a tape receiving or take-up reel 56b. Suitable tape advance may be obtained by appropriately gearing the worm gear 53, and take-up or tape receiving reel drive gears; gear 54, pinion gear 55, and take-up reel gear 56. It has been found that a tape advance of 1/32 inch per revolution is sufficient to expose a fresh portion of tape 49 capable of securing a workpiece.

The take-up reel 56b and the tape supply reel 57 are placed on the opposite side of housing 59 from the take-up reel drive gear 56, as shown in FIG. 6. The take-up reel 56b, gears 54, 55, 56 and the supply reel 57 are carried by shafts which are attached to housing 59 and thereby fixedly interconnected to sleeve 50. FIGS. and 6 illustrate the relative locations of the previously descirbed gears and reels.

As shown in FIG. 2, an extension of sleeve 50 also carries a stop cam 78, an up air blast cam 79, a puller cam 80 and a side air blast cam (the last cam is not shown but is similar to the others).

Upon rotation of sleeve 50, the appropriately placed cams activate corresponding switches which include, a stop cam switch 81, an up blast cam switch 82, a puller cam switch 83 and a side air blast cam switch (not shown). The pick-up and transfer unit is enshrouded on one side thereof, i.e., on the side which carries the workpiece, with a sheet metal workpiece guide 60.

A pick-up and transfer unit motor 48 is carried in an outwardly extending frame 40a. Activation of motor 48 causes unit 47 to transfer a workpiece of the upper position where the blank is placed over a stripper plate 69, having a notched tappered leading edge. A double rib puller wheel 61, located above stripper plate 69, is activated by a puller cam 80 and switch 83 (as further explained in the discussion pertaining to the electrical control means) through a puller wheel solenoid valve activated pneumatic cylinder 95. The puller wheel 61 then engages the workpiece thereby removing it from contact with tape 49 extending around a tape head roller 58.

Puller wheel 61 is carried on a shaft 89 which extends between two fulcrum arms 63. The fulcrum arms are pivotally attached at one end thereof to a shaft 85a and are driven constantly by a puller wheel belt 84 which extends between two pulleys 84a and 84b. Pulley 84b is attached to an extension ofa shaft carrying one of the conveyor rollers 66. Engagement of the puller wheel 61 with the workpiece is facilitated by a puller wheel spring 64 which urges the puller wheel 61 is caused by extension of the rod from cylinder 95. By appropriately gearing pulleys 84a and 84b, the speed of the puller wheel 61 may be selected to provide suitable disengagement of the workpiece from tape 49.

The operating cycle of the workpiece transfer device is initiated when motor 46 raises table 41 until the workpiece stack contacts tape 49. The upward motion of table 41 and stack 72 continues until the stack touches a foot plate 73 having a foot plate joint 74 attached to a fulcrum arm 75. Fulcrum arm 75 thereby pivots and actuates an up-limit microswitch which causes the travel direction of table 41 to be reversed thereby lowering stack 72.

The downward movement of table 41 is arrested when microswitch 71 is engaged by fulcrum arm which is now activated by the weight of the freely suspended foot plate 73. As previously mentioned, the stack is driven by motor 46 through shaft 76 and pinions 43. In FIG. 4, the housing which carries the rack guides 44 and motor 46 is identified as 77.

When up-limit microswitch 70 is activated, a solenoid valve is also activated to direct a side air blast through a side air blast tube 89b affixed between portions of housing 77. Activation of the solenoid valve is caused by the rotation of the side air blast cam (not shown) with respect to the side air blast cam switch (not shown) which are affixed to the rotating portion of the shaft 50. The duration of side air blast can be adjusted by appropriate electrical control means. The workpiece is prevented from being blown away or blown out of position because foot plate 73 still rests against the top of stack 72 when the air blast tube 89b is activated. However, the air blast does help in partially separating the individual workpiece which has been contacted by the tape 49. As previously mentioned, as soon as the up-limit microswitch 70 is activated by the fulcrum arm 75, the table 41 continues downwardly and the top limit microswitch 71 becomes activated. Activation of microswitch 71, through the electrical means, also deactivates the side air blast solenoid valve. However, table 41 may continue to move downwardly if suitable electrical delay is used in operating pick-up motor 46.

At this point, a single workpiece is now attached to the tape pick-up at pick-up head roller 58 and thus the tape 49 carries the workpiece as unit 47 rotates, upwardly. The step-by-step pick-up sequence is illustrated in FIGS. 3a to 3c. Although a single ply may be attached to tape 49, it is possible that two workpieces may still adhere to each other and be picked up together by tape 49. A short air pulse called a delayed air blast is employed in order to ensure that no additional workpieces are picked up. This air blast is effected through a nozzle 68 and is directed along the length of the workpiece, thus separating the two workpieces should the same be stuck together. The separated workpiece then settles down on the top of stack 72 to be ready for pick up again.

The delayed air blast may be keyed to the side blast nozzle cam switch 91 with appropriate delay elements. Nozzle 68 on the holding frame 86 may be adjusted in height by moving the nozzle within the slots 86a provided on the end member 86b of frame 86.

In addition to nozzle 68, an up air blast tube 67 may consist of a plurality of tubes or an individual nozzle placed on end member 86b of frame 86 to reduce the wrinkling of the workpiece as it is being pulled over the sheet metal guide 60. The up air blast is continued while the workpiece transfer device rotates through about from its pick-up position. The purpose of the up air blast is to form a drooping front edge of the single workpiece by urging the blank against the sheet metal guide 60. As the tape 49 carries the workpiece from the pick-up position, a stripper plate 69 having a notched out portion 69a, cooperates with a puller wheel 61 to strip the workpiece from its contact with tape 49.

The pullerwheel 61 stays in the down position until enough of the workpiece has been advanced onto the conveyor rollers 66 such that the friction of the conveyor roller 66 is sufficient to transport the workpiece without further assistance from the puller wheel 61. It should be noted that although puller wheel 61 has been described as being raised by cylinder 95 and lowered by spring 64, cylinder 95 also can be a double acting pneumatic cylinder which is activated in both upward and downward direction by solenoid valve 62.

A side guide plate 660 is placed over the rollers 66 at an angle slightly askewed to the direction perpendicular to the axis of rotation of rollers 66 so as to cause the rollers 66 to urge and guide the workpiece into a proper position on the sewing table.

Unit 47 continues to rotate clockwise until it reaches its bottom position whereat a new cycle can begin. A side guide 87 for table 41 is also provided to appropriately constrain the stacked workpieces as the table 41 moves up and down.

The conveyor rollers 66 are housed in a housing 93; and are appropriately driven by chains or intergeared and driven by a motor from a power take off gear conventionally known in the art. Motors 46 and 48 are motors which exhibit instant stopping characteristics. These motors are freely available in the trade.

In reference to FIGS. 2 and 7 manual tape feed means are provided for manually winding tape 49 onto tape take-up reel 56b. During normal operation, a latch rod holder 96 engages a plunger latch wheel 96a at the end of crank 97 in such a manner as to prevent the fixed shaft 51 from rotating. When it is desired to feed the tape 49 manually, such as when installing a new reel of tape or when feeding the same around the head roller 58 and onto the take-up reel 56b, the small plunger latch wheel 96a is pulled out of the latch rod holder 96 against the restoring force of spring 96b and the crank 97 is rotated by hand. Shaft 51, which is fixedly held by the crank 97, then rotates turning worm gear 53 which drives gear 54 whithout rotating the housing 59, (whereas normally, the worm gear 54 is driven around the worm 53). A control panel, which houses the electrical and pneumatic control devices associated with the single ply pick-up and transfer device, is identified by 94.

ELECTRICAL CONTROL MEANS The electrical control circuit for the single ply workpiece pickup and transfer device 40 described above is illustrated as 800 in FIG. 8. The manner in which control circuit 800 operates will now be explained by describing what happens at each step in its operating cycle.

Initial Conditions Prior to Start of Operating Cycle Standard alternating current is applied to AC power terminal 803 and ground terminal 802. 26 volts DC is applied between DC power terminal 801 and ground terminal 802. The following conditions exist:

1. The stack holder table 41 is in a down position, causing down limit switch 71, and up limit switch 70, to assume the respective positions shown.

2. Relays 804, 805, 806, 807, 808, and 809 are deenergized.

3. Diodes 820 and 830, of first delay circuit 810 and second delay circuit 811, respectively, are grounded through relay 806. This places both delay circuits in a hold mode as follows:

5 a. Capacitors 821 and 831 are by-passed to ground through diodes 820 and 830, respectively. b. Zener diodes 825 and 835 are thus nonconductive. c. Transistors 827 and 837 are biased into nonconduction by resistors 826 and 836, respectively.

Start of Operating Cycle The operating cycle is initiated by completing the ground path to start terminal 812. This is accomplished through the output terminal of another electrical control circuit, as described in the aforementioned copending application.

This provides a ground path for the coil of relay 804, causing it to energize and latch through the up-limit microswitch 70. The following then occurs:

1. The up winding of motor 46 is energized through relay 804, causing the stack holder table 41 to travel up. As the stack 72 rises, down limit switch 71 is mechanically actuated, causing it to assume its respective position.

2. Transistor 844, which is normally biased into nonconduction by diode 843, is caused to conduct momentarily by a drive pulse through the pulse network composed of resistor 840, capacitor 841 and resistor 842. This momentarily energizes relay 805, which is the emitter path of transistor 844.

3. Workpiece transfer motor 48 is momentarily energized through relay 805. The momentary rotation of workpiece transfer motor 48 mechanically actuates stop cam switch 81, causing it to close, thereby energizing workpiece transfer motor 48.

4. After V2 revolution of workpiece transfer motor 48, puller cam switch 83 is momentarily mechanically actuated causing it to momentarily close. Puller solenoid valve 62a is thereby momentarily energized, causing the workpiece ply to be transferred away.

5. After one revolution of workpiece transfer motor 48, stop cam switch 81 is mechanically actuated causing it to open, thereby deenergizing workpiece transfer motor 48.

Stack Contacts Tape gized through relay 806, causing the stack to travel down.

b. Transistor 853, normally biased into nonconduction by resistor 852, is driven into conduction through resistor 840 and 851, and relay 806. 0. Side air blast solenoid valve 89a, in the collector path of transistor 853, is energized.

d. Diodes 820 and 830, of first delay circuit 810 and second delay circuit 811, respectively, are ungrounded. Both delay circuits remain in hold conditions, pending actuation of down limit switch 71, which will provide DC voltage to the delay circuits.

Stacks Downward Travel Actuates Down Limit Switch As the stack travels down, the down limit switch 71 is mechanically actuated, causing it to assume its respective position, with the following results:

1. Side air blast solenood voave 80a is de-energized.

Diode 819 prevents transistor 853 from being damaged by the back e.m.f. generated when side air blast solenoid valve 89a is de-energized.

2. 26 volts DC is applied to resistors 824 and 834, of first delay circuit 810 and second delay circuit 811, respectively. This causes both delay circuits to be energized as follows:

a. Resistor 824, variable resistor 823, capacitor 821 and resistor 822 form a first series RC circuit. Resistor 834, variable resistor 833, capacitor 831 and resistor 832 form a second series RC circuit. 26 volts DC is applied to both series RC circuits through down limit switch 71.

b. Capacitors 821 and 831 charge at rates which are adjustable by variable resistors 823 and 833, respectively. Component values are selected so that the time constant of the first series RC circuit is shorter than the time constant of the second RC circuit, thereby causing capacitor 821 to charge faster than capacitor 831.

End of First Delay Interval After a period of time, corresponding to that required for capacitor 821 to charge until the voltage at the junction of capacitor 821 and zener diode 825 equals the zener voltage of zener diode 825, first delay circuit 810 switches as follows:

1. Zener diode 825 conducts, providing base drive to transistor 827.

2. Transistor 827 assumes a conducting state causing relay 807, in its collector path, to energize with the following results:

a. Capacitor 815, which was previously charged through resistor 816, is connected to the coil of relay 808. This momentarily energizes relay 808.

b. Delayed air blast solenoid valve 68a is momentarily energized through relay 808, producing the delayed air blast referred to hereinbefore. Capacitor 813 and resistor 814 form an arc suppressing circuit to protect the contacts of relay 808.

End of Second Timing lnterval After a period of time, corresponding to the time required for capacitor 831 to charge until the voltage at the junction of capacitor 831 and zener diode 835 equals the zener voltage of zener diode 835, second delay circuit 811 switches as follows:

l. Zener diode 835 condudts, providing base drive to transistor 837.

2. Transistor 837 assumes a conducting state causing relay 809, in its collector path, to energize.

3. The ground path to the coil of relay 806 through relay 809 is opened, causing relay 806 to deenergize.

4. Diodes 820 and 830, of first delay circuit 810 and second delay circuit 811, respectively, are grounded. This causes both delay circuits to reset as follows:

a. Capacitors 821 and 831 discharge through diodes 820 and 830, respectively.

b. Zener diodes 825 and 835 thus return to their non-conducting states.

c. Having no base drive, transistors 827 and 837 return to their non-conducting states, causing relays 807 and 809 to de-energize. Diodes 817 and 818 prevent transistors 827 and 837, respectively, from being damaged by the back e.m.f. generated when relays 807 and 809 de-energize.

All circuits have thus returned to their initial conditions, marking the completion of one operating cycle of the workpiece blank pickup and transfer.

What is claimed is:

1. An apparatus for providing individual work pieces comprising, means for holding a stack of work pieces in a supply position including means for raising and lowering said holding means, rotatable transfer means positioned above said holding means for transferring said work piece from a surface down position to a surface up position including adhesive means for adhesive contact with a work piece operatively interconnected with said transfer means, said adhesive means comprising an adhesive tape and said transfer means comprising, a housing pivotally supported about a horizontal axis, a plurality of reels for supporting and receiving said adhesive tape rotatably supported on said housing, means for guiding said adhesive tape to a periphery of said transfer means, and means for advancing said adhesive-tape between said reels;

means for directing a first blast of air along the sides of said holding means and towards the uppermost work piece on said stack and means for directing a second blast of air towards the uppermost work piece on said stack adjacent said adhesive means to insure separation of said uppermost work piece from the next piece in the stack;

means for rotating said transfer means about a horizontal axis, means for supporting a work piece on said transfer means, and means for disengaging a work piece from adhesive contact with said adhesive means.

2. An apparatus as described in claim 1 including means for controlling and cycling said apparatus.

3. An apparatus as described in claim 1 and wherein said means for holding a stack of workpieces comprises a vertically positionable table, and wherein said means for raising and lowering said holding means comprises, at least one rack attached to said table, an intermediate gear mated to each rack, and reversible driving means for rotating said intermediate gear.

4. An apparatus as described in claim 1 and wherein said means for disengaging a workpiece from adhesive contact with said adhesive means comprises, a plate having a tapered edge and having a notch on said tapered edge, a puller wheel vertically positionable adjacent said notch, and means for positioning said puller wheel.

5. An apparatus for providing individual work pieces comprising, means for holding a stack of work pieces in a supply position including means for raising and lowering said holding means, rotatable transfer means positioned above said holding means including adhesive means for adhesive contact with a work piece operatively interconnected with said transfer means, means for rotating said transfer means about a horizontal axis, means for supporting a work piece on said transfer means, means for disengaging a work piece from adhesive contact with said adhesive means, and means for controlling and cycling said apparatus; said means for controlling and cycling said apparatus including an electrical circuit which comprises:

a. means for sensing a raised position of said stack of work pieces;

b. means, responsive to said means for sensing a raised position, for directing a blast of air towards the sides of said holding means and towards the uppermost work piece on said stack;

0. means for energizing said means for rotating said transfer means responsive to said means for sensing a raised position;

d. means for energizing said means for lowering said holding means operatively interconnected to said means for sensing a raised position;

e. means for sensing a lowered position of said stack of work pieces;

f. first delay means operatively interconnected to said means for sensing a lowered position;

g. means, operatively interconnected with said first delay means, for directing a blast of air towards the top of the stack along the side thereof adjacent said adhesive means;

h. means for activating said means for disengaging a work piece operatively interconnected to said means for rotating;

i. means for energizing said means for raising said holding means operatively interconnected to said means for sensing a lowered position; and

j. second delay means operatively interconnected to said means for sensing a lowered position for returning said electrical circuit to its initial conditions.

6. An apparatus for furnishing workpieces comprising:

a. a frame;

b. a vertically-movable workpiece supply table slidably mounted on a lower portion of said frame, said supply table having a plurality of vertically positioned racks attached thereto;

c. a supply table drive motor having an extended drive shaft, said drive shaft having a plurality of pinion gears mounted thereon in engagement with said racks;

d. a horizontal tubular shaft rotatably mounted on said frame above said supply table, including drive means for rotating said tubular shaft about its longitudinal axis;

e. a housing rigidly attached to said tubular shaft, said housing having an adhesive tape'supply reel, an adhesive tape receiving reel and an adhesive tape guide roller rotatably mounted thereon in mutual planar relationship, and said guide roller positioned at the periphery of said housing;

f. an inner shaft rotatably mounted within said tubular shaft and extending therefrom, said inner shaft having a worm gear at one end thereof and a crank at the other end thereof;

g. a manually releasable latch mounted on said housing and engagable with said crank;

h. a first reel drive gear axially connected to said adhesive tape receiving reel;

i. a second reel drive gear rotatably mounted on said housing and interconnected to said first gear;

j. a third reel drive gear axially connected to said second gear and interconnected to said worm gear on said inner shaft;

k. a workpiece stripper plate attached to said frame above said tubular shaft and said housing, said stripper plate having a beveled edge and a notch in said beveled edge;

I. a rotatable puller wheel pivotally mounted on said frame above said stripper plate;

rn. conveyor means for advancing a workpiece away from said stripper plate and for driving said puller wheel;

n. means for controlling and cycling said apparatus;

0. a workpiece supply position sensor positioned above said supply table including a fulcrum arm having a suspended plate attached to one end thereof, and two microswitches vertically positioned on alternate sides of the other end of said fulcrum arm, said microswitches operatively interconnected to said'means for controlling and cycling said apparatus;

p. at least one side air blast jet horizontally mounted on said frame and directed toward said supply table, said side air blast jet operatively interconnected to said means for controlling and cycling said apparatus;

q. at least one up air blast jet mounted on said frame and directed toward said housing, said up air blast jet operatively interconnected to said means for controlling and cycling said apparatus;

. a pneumatic cylinder attached to said frame and having a vertically positioned piston rod interconmeans for controlling and cycling said apparatus.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification271/33, 271/118, 271/97, 271/155
International ClassificationB65H3/00, B65H3/20
Cooperative ClassificationB65H3/20
European ClassificationB65H3/20
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Aug 8, 1990ASAssignment
Owner name: CONGRESS FINANCIAL CORPORATION (SOUTHWEST), TEXAS
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:FARAH INCORPORATED;REEL/FRAME:005401/0609
Effective date: 19900801