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Publication numberUS3785657 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 15, 1974
Filing dateFeb 7, 1972
Priority dateNov 22, 1971
Publication numberUS 3785657 A, US 3785657A, US-A-3785657, US3785657 A, US3785657A
InventorsB Moller
Original AssigneeB Moller
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Golf club swing training device
US 3785657 A
Abstract
There is disclosed a golf exercising device incorporating a flywheel providing resistance to downswing movement of a simulated golf club. The flywheel also acts to store energy thereby providing a realistic pull on the simulated golf club at the top of the backswing and providing self-powered follow-through movement of the simulated golf club. In one embodiment of the invention, a tachometer is operatively connected to the flywheel to provide a visual indication of how hard the golf club is being swung. Another embodiment of the invention incorporates a gear unit for increasing speed of the flywheel relative to the golf club handle. Another embodiment provides a gear ratio selector for the gear unit to change the relative speeds of the flywheel and the golf club handle.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Moller [111 3,785,657 [4 Jan. 15, 1974 GOLF CLUB SWING TRAINING DEVICE [21] Appl. No.: 223,937

Related US. Application Data [63] Continuation-impart of Ser. No. 201,222, Nov. 22, 1971, Pat. No. 3,738,661, which is a continuation of Ser. No. 53,535, July 9, 1970, abandoned.

ENERGY STORAGE CAPACITY= 2|5 AT 7ORPM 3,444,729 5/1969 Shobert 273/191 R Primary ExaminerGeorge J. Marlo Attorney-G. Turner Moller [5 7 ABSTRACT There is disclosed a golf exercising device incorporating a flywheel providing resistance to downswing movement of a simulated golf club. The flywheel also acts to store energy thereby providing a realistic pull on the simulated golf club at the top of the backswing and providing self-powered follow-through movement of the simulated golf club. In one embodiment of the invention, a tachometer is operatively connected to the flywheel to provide a visual indication of how hard the golf club is being swung. Another embodiment of the invention incorporates a gear unit for increasing speed of the flywheel relative to the golf club handle. Another embodiment provides a gear ratio selector for the gear unit to change the relative speeds of the flywheel and the golf club handle.

11 Claims, Drawing Figures PATENTEB JAN 1 SW74 SHEH 1 9? L155 ENERGY STORAGE GEAR RATIO SELECTOR GOLF CLUB SWING TRAINING DEVICE This application is a continuation-in-part of application Ser. No. 201,222, filed Nov. 22, 1971, entitled GOLF EXERCISING DEVICE, now patent No. 3,738,661, which is a continuation of application Ser. No. 53,535, filed July 9, 1970 now abandoned.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION As explained in the aforementioned application, golf exercising devices incorporating brakes are known in the prior art, for example US. Pat. Nos. 2,472,065 and 3,462,156. In these devices, the movement of the golf club is restrained by a friction brake at least during the downswing part of the golfers swing, to provide an exercising function.

To applicants knowledge, the prior art has failed to suggest the use ofa flywheel as a restraining means during the downswing part of the golfers swing. The use of a flywheel rather than a mechanical or hydraulic brake introduces a high degree of simplicity, freedom from wear and freedom from maladjustment.

US. Pat. No. 2,299,781 suggests the provision of a counterweight to counterbalance part of the weight of the golf club supporting mechanism. This indicates that the mass of rotating parts has heretofore been considered a liability rather than an asset. Since the counterweight proposed in this patent counterbalances part of the weight of the golf club supporting mechanism, it will be apparent that the counterweight does not restrain movement of the golf club but instead aids in movement of the golf club.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION It is an object of this invention to provide a golf exercising device characterized by simplicity, freedom from wear and freedom from maladjustment.

Another object of the invention is to provide a golf exercising device incorporating therein a flywheel for restraining movement of a simulated golf club atleast during the downswing part of the golfers swing while lending realism in the use of the device, particularly at the top of the backswing and during the followthrough.

In summary, one aspect of this invention comprises a golf exercising device for constraining movement of a handle moved by an exercising golfer in an arcuate swing path comprising a bracket for attachment to a support, a member mounted on the bracket for rotation about an axis pointed generally toward the golfer, an arm carried by the rotatable member for transmitting movement ofa handle into rotation of the member, and a handle carried by the arm for grasping by the golfer, and means operatively connected to the rotatable member for restraining rotation thereof during at least the downswing part of the golfers swing including flywheel means having an energy storage capacity of at least foot pounds at maximum rotational arm speeds less than 70 revolutions per minute.

In summary, another aspect of this invention comprises a golf exercising device includinga handle for grasping by an individual; means mounting the handle for movement in an arcuate simulated golf club swing path; and means operatively connected to the handle for restraining movement thereof during at least the downswing part of the swing path including flywheel means and means for rotating the flywheel means faster than the handle.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a partial cross sectional view illustrating a simplified embodiment of this invention;

FIG. 2 is a side elevational view of a slightly more complicated embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 3 is a side elevational view, certain parts being broken away for clarity of illustration, illustrating another embodiment of the invention in use;

FIG. 4 is a front partially schematic view illustrating the backswing portion of the golfers swing;

FIG. 5 is a view similar to FIG. 4 illustrating the downswing and follow-through portions of the golfers swing; and

FIG. 6 is a simplified view of another embodiment of the invention incorporating a tachometer.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring to FIG. 1, there is illustrated a golf exercising device 10 of the simplest type. The device 10 comprises as major components a bracket 12, a shaft 14 mounted on the bracket 12 for rotation about an axis 16, flywheel means 18 secured to the shaft 14, an arm 20 affixed to the shaft 14 and a golf club handle 22 rotatably mounted to the arm 20.

The bracket 12 may be of any convenient type and is illustrated as comprising a first plate 24 secured by suitable bolts 26 to a wall or support 28 and a second plate 30 generally downwardly inclined with respect to the wall 28. Suitable gussets 32 or the like may be provided as desired. Extending upwardly from the second plate 30 are a pair of bearing blocks 34, 36 which rotatable mount the shaft 14 about the axis 16. As will be more fully apparent hereinafter, the axis 16 points generally toward the exercising golfer and preferably is angled toward the left side of a right-handled golfer or toward the right side of a left-handed golfer. .ln other words, the axis I6 is downwardly inclined tothe horizontal and angled toward the leading side of the golfer to promote an inside-out swing.

The flywheel means 18 includes a flywheel member 38 affixed to the shaft 14 by a conventional spline 40. The flywheel means 18 also includes the shaft 14, the arm 20 and the handle 22 which are the remaining rotating parts in the golf exercising device 10. The

flywheel means 18 should. have the capacity of absorbing at least l5 foot pounds of energy at reasonable rotational speeds necessary in exercising while simulating a golf swing. In the device of FIG. 1, the flywheel effect of the shaft 14, the arm 20 and the handle 22 is negligible compared to the flywheel effect of the flywheel 38 which has an outer diameter of about 14 inches. Assuming that the center of inertia 42 of the flywheel 38 is approximately 6 inches from the axis 16, the flywheel 38 would have to weigh about 8.7 pounds at a maximum rotational speed of 200 revolutions per minute. In the device of FIG. 1, the handle 22 would have to be rotated at 200 revolutions per minute which is greater than desirable. To provide an energy absorption capacity of 15 foot pounds at a more realistic maximum rotational speed of revolutions per minute, the flywheel 38 would have to weigh about 70 pounds.

For men exercisers, it is desirable that the flywheel means 18 be capable of absorbing a substantially greater amount of energy than foot pounds. Experimentation has revealed that a preferred energy absorption capacity is at least in the range of 5075 foot pounds and preferably is in the order of about 100 foot pounds. To provide a preferred energy absorption capacity of 100 foot pounds at a desirable maximum rotational speed of 70 revolutions per minute, a 14 inch outer diameter flywheel would have to weigh about 450 pounds. To provide the preferred energy absorption capacity at a maximum rotational speed of 70 revolutions per minute, a 26 inch outer diameter flywheel would have to weigh about 1 15 pounds. For women, and especially for children, the preferred energy absorption capacity of the flywheel should be substantially less. It will be more fully apparent as the description proceeds that the embodiments of FIGS. 2 and 3, because of the excessive size and mass of the flywheel of FIG. 1, are more practicable when greater flywheel effects are desired.

The arm is connected to the shaft 14 by an adapter 44. The handle 22 is rotatably mounted, about the axis thereof, to the arm 20. The arm 20, the adapter 44 and the handle 22 are more fully disclosed in either of the aforementioned applications to which reference is made for a more complete description.

In use, the individual exercising with the device 10 grasps the handle 22 and swings the handle in a normal golf swing. The inertia of the flywheel l8 ensures that the swing is smooth and without jerks. By using the device 10, the individual not only obtains a substantial exercise but also conditions his muscles to swing in a smooth fashion. Since the inertia of the flywheel means 18 preferably is substantially greater than that of a conventional golf club, an individual using the device 10 becomes accustomed to the comparitively heavier feel in much the same manner that a batter in baseball becomes accustomed to a weighted bat. When the individual plays golf, his clubs will feel light and the individuals hands will be stronger and quicker.

Referring to FIG. 2, there is disclosed a golf exercising device 50 comprising another embodiment of the invention. The exercising device 50 comprises as major components a bracket 52, a shaft 54 mounted on the bracket 52 for rotation about an axis 56, flywheel means 58 operatively connected to the shaft 54, an arm 60 affixed to the shaft 54 and a golf club handle 62 rotatably mounted to the arm 60.

The bracket 52 may be of any convenient type and is illustrated as comprising a first plate 64 secured by suitable bolts 66 to a wall or support 68 and a second plate 70 generally downwardly inclined with respect to the wall 68. Extending downwardly from the second plate 70 are a pair of bearing blocks 72, 74 which mount the shaft 54 for rotation about the axis 56. As in the embodiment of FIG. 1, the axis 56 points generally toward the golfer and preferably toward the leading side of the individual.

The flywheel means 58 includes a flywheel 76, an operative connection 78 between the flywheel 76 and the shaft 54, the shaft 54, the arm 60 and the handle 62. As will be apparent from an inspection of FIGS. 1 and 2, the major difference between the exercising devices 10, 50 resides in the operative connection between the respective flywheels 38, 76 and the respective shafts 14, 54. The operative connection 78 includes a shaft 80 fixed to the flywheel 76 and mounted for rotation by a pair of suitable bearing blocks 82, 84, a small gear 86 affixed to the shaft and a large gear 88 affixed to the shaft 54. The ratio between the gears 88, 86 is preferably quite large to reduce the mass of the flywheel 76 while retaining a comparable energy absorption capacity. Although a gear arrangement of any desired type may be utilized in the embodiment of FIG. 2, the simple two gear arrangement ordinarily has a gear ratio of about 5:] and practically has a maximum ratio of about l0: 1. It will be appreciated that the gears 86, 88 act as flywheels to the extent determined by the inertia thereof while the shafts 54, 80, the arm 60 and the handle 62 have negligible inertia. One skilled in the art can easily determine the desired size of the flywheel 76 to give the flywheel means 58 the desired energy absorption capacity.

To illustrate the effect of the overdrive gear unit between the handle 62 and the flywheel 76 which has an outer diameter of about 9 inches, it may be assumed that the gear ratio is 10:], the maximum rotational speed of the handle 62 is 70 revolutions/minute, the inertia of the gears 86, 88 is negligible, the center of inertia of the flywheel 76 is 4 inches from the axis of the shaft 80, and a minimum energy absorption capacity of about 100 foot pounds under similar conditions, the flywheel 76 would necessarily weigh about 10.7 pounds. It will accordingly be apparent that the provision of the overdrive gear unit 86, 88 between the handle 62 and the flywheel 76 allows the weight and size of the flywheel 76 to be materially reduced while retaining all of the remaining features of the invention.

As in the embodiment of FIG. 1, the arm 60 includes an adapter 90 for attachment to the shaft 54. The handle 62 is rotatably mounted, about the axis thereof, to the arm 60. The arm 60, the adapter 90 and the handle 62 are more fully disclosed in either of the aforementioned applications, to which reference is made for a more complete description.

In use, the device 50 is substantially the same as the device 10.

Referring to FIG. 3, there is illustrated a preferred golf exercising device in accordance with the principles of this invention. The device comprises as major components a bracket 102, a shaft 104 mounted on the bracket 102 for rotation about an axis 106, flywheel means 108 operatively connected to the shaft 104, an arm 110 affixed to the shaft 104 and a golf club handle 112 rotatably mounted on the arm 110.

The bracket 102 may be of any convenient type and is illustrated as comprising a first plate 114 secured by suitable bolts 116 to a wall or support 1 18 and a second plate 120 generally downwardly inclined with respect to the wall 118.

Mounted on the second plate 120 by a suitable spacer 122 is a housing 124 having bearings therein for rotatably mounting the shaft 104 about the axis 106. Positioned in the housing 124 is a flywheel 126 comprising part of the flywheel means 108. The flywheel 126 is secured to a shaft 128 mounted for rotation by suitable bearings 130 in the housing 124. Operatively connecting the shaft 104 and the shaft 128 is a gear unit 132 positioned in the front part of the housing 124. A conventional gear box of this type typically includes an electric motor, an input shaft operatively connected to the motor, a gear reduction unit and an output shaft. To adapt this conventional type gear box for incorporation into the golf exercising device 100, the electric motor is removed, a flywheel is attached to the input shaft and the arm 110 is attached to the output shaft. It will be apparent that the output shaft of the conventional gear box has been converted into the input shaft of the exercising device. Accordingly, instead of acting as a gear reduction unit, the gear box acts as an overdrive unit.

In one model constructed in accordance with FIG. 3, the shaft 104, the housing 124, the shaft 128, the bearings 130, the gear unit 132 and the spacer 122 comprise a modified 1/10 horsepower electric gearmotor manufactured by the Dayton Company. In this unit, the ratio between the driving and driven shafts is 602l. Using this particular ratio, the flywheel 126 rotates 60 times faster than the shaft 104. In this model, the flywheel 126 comprised a 2-pound, 4 inch outer diameter aluminum flywheel. It is evident that a gear box comprising two or more input-output ratios can be used to advantage in adapting one exercising device to be used by men, women and children golfers.

The arm 110 is connected to the shaft 104 by an adapter 134. The handle 112 is rotatably mounted, about the axis thereof, to the arm 110. The arm 110, the adapter 134 and the handle 112 are more fully disclosed in either of the aforementioned applications to which reference is made for a more complete description.

As in the embodiments of FIGS. l and 2, the handle 112, the arm 110, the shaft 104 and the gear unit 132 comprise part of the flywheel means 108 and contribute something toward the flywheel effect. As contrasted to the embodiment of FIG. 2, the gearing in the gear unit 132 is of relatively light weight and is not believed to contribute appreciably to the flywheel effect. The center of inertia of the flywheel in the model constructed in accordance with FIG. 3 is about 1% inches from the axis of rotation. Exercising with the model reveals that the handle 112 can be swung smoothly at a maximum rotational speed of about 70 revolutions per minute. The energy stored in the flywheel 126 is thus about 100 foot pounds.

By utilizing a flywheel having a relatively large energy absorption capacity, the handle 112 must be swung rather smoothly since the flywheel 126 prevents abrupt acceleration and deacceleration of the shaft 104. Thus the flywheel 126 makes it necessary to apply force and movement smoothly and without jerks to the handle 112 thereby helping in the development of a smooth, natural and fluid swing. It will also be evident that repeated usage of the device 110 will train the golf ers muscles to swing in a smooth fashion. Since the golf club handle of the device of this invention is substantially harder to swing than a conventional golf club, the person exercising becomes accustomed to an apparently heavier club much like a batter in baseball becomes accustomed to a bat having a weight thereon. When the exerciser uses a conventional golf club, after having developed the proper muscles with the exercising device of this invention, he is able to swing a golf club at a greater speed and in a better controlled are.

FIG. 4 schematically illustrates the forces during the backswing portion of the golfers swing while utilizing the exercising device 10. The solid line position of the arm and the handle 22 illustrates the starting position while the arrow 136 illustrates the force application path of the golfer on the arm 20 during the backswing. The arrow 138 illustrates the movement of the flywheel 38. As the arm 20 reaches the dotted line position, illustrating the top of the backswing, the flywheel 38 tends to continue rotation thereby providing a tug or pull on the arm 20, illustrated by the arrow 140, and giving the exerciser the same feeling he gets at the top of the backswing with a golf club.

Referringto FIG. 5, the forces during the downswing and follow-through movement of the exercising device 10 is schematically illustrated. The arrow 142 illustrates the downswing force application and movement of the arm 20 as powered by the exercising golfer. The arrow 144 illustrates the rotation of the flywheel 38 as energy is stored therein. The line 146 illustrates the end of the downswing force or the golfer-powered stroke while the arrow 148 illustrates the follow-through movement of the arm 20 as powered to a substantial degree by the energy stored in the flywheel 38. The arrow 150 illustrates the rotation of the flywheel 38 during the follow-through movement when the energy stored in the flywheel 38, during movement in the arc illustrated by the arrow 144, is delivered to the arm 20 and club handle 24. This gives the exerciser the same feel that he would get after a golf club has hit a ball and the club momentum pulls his hands and arms through the follow-through arc.

Referring to FIG. 6, there is illustrated an important additional feature of the invention. FIG. 6 comprises a partial schematic view of the golf exercising device 100 incorporating basically a tachometer 152. The tachometer 152 is illustrated as of the magnetic-mechanical type including a pulley 154 affixed to the shaft 128, a belt 156 connecting the pulley 154 to a second pulley 158 which drives a shaft 160 connected to a tachometer mechanism residing in a housing 162. The tachometer 152 includes a pointer 164 and indicia 166 which are perferably calibrated in terms of distance or some other parameter indicating how far the golf ball would be hit or how hard the golf club is being swung. It will accordingly be seen that the tachometer 152 includes means for sensing the rotational rate of the flywheel 126 and means responsive to the sensing means for displaying a value proportional to the rotational rate.

It will be apparent to those skilled in the art that the tachometer 152 may be of any suitable type, for example an electrical tachometer having a sensor and a remote display. The tachometer 152 is desirably positioned several feet below the housing 124 so that the golfer may view the tachometer 152 while keeping his head in the normal position during the swing.

I claim;

1. A golf exercising device for constraining movement of a handle moved by an exercising individual in an arcuate swing path comprising a bracket for attachment to a support;

a member mounted on the bracket for rotation about an axis pointed generally toward the golfer;

an arm carried by the rotatable member for movement through the arcuate swing path to transmit movement of the handle into rotation of the member;

a handle carried by the arm for grasping by the individual; and

means operatively connected to the rotatable member for restraining rotation thereof during at least the downswing part of the individuals swing including means having an energy storage capacity of at least 15 foot pounds at maximum rotational arm speeds less than 70 revolutions per minute, the last mentioned means including a flywheel member.

2. The golf exercising device of claim 1 wherein the last mentioned means includes the rotatable member, the arm and the handle.

3. The golf exercising device of claim 1 wherein the restraining means includes means operatively connected between the arm and the flywheel member for rotating the flywheel member faster than the arm.

4. The golf exercising device of claim 3 wherein the speed ratio between the flywheel member and the arm is not less than 5:1.

5. The golf exercising device of claim 3 further comprising means for varying the speed of the flywheel member relative to the arm.

6. The golf exercising device of claim 3 wherein the last mentioned means comprises gears, the gears also comprising part of the means having an energy storage capacity.

7. The golf exercising device of claim 1 further comprising means for sensing the rotational speed of the flywheel member and means responsive to the sensing means for displaying a value proportional to the sensed rotational speed.

8. The golf exercising device of claim 1 wherein the restraining means includes means connecting the flywheel member to the arm throughout the path of movement thereof for restraining rotation of the member during the backswing and downswing parts of the individuals swing.

9. A golf exercising device for constraining movement of a handle moved by an exercising individual in an arcuate swing path comprising a handle for grasping by an individual; means mounting the handle for movement in an arcuate simulated golf club swing path about an axis pointed generally toward the individual; and

means operatively connected to the handle for restraining movement thereof during at least the downswing part of the swing path including a flywheel member and means for rotating the flywheel member faster than the handle.

10. The golf exercising device of claim 8 wherein the flywheel member provides an energy storage capacity in excess of 15 foot pounds at maximum rotational arm speeds less than revolutions per minute.

11. The golf exercising device of claim 9 wherein the restraining means includes means connecting the flywheel member to the handle throughout the path of movement thereof for restraining movement of the handle during the backswing part of the individuals swing.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1983920 *Jan 6, 1932Dec 11, 1934Robert W HigginsGolf swing device
US2737432 *Sep 11, 1952Mar 6, 1956Jenks George M TroutmanGolf practice apparatus
US3429571 *Dec 8, 1966Feb 25, 1969Roy Abel JrProgrammed swing training device
US3444729 *Oct 21, 1966May 20, 1969Samuel M ShobertGolf club swinging apparatus
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5242344 *Oct 31, 1990Sep 7, 1993Hundley Kenneth WLimb movement exercising and training apparatus
US7976444 *May 30, 2008Jul 12, 2011Matthew BinnsShoulder rehabilitation and exercise device
US8070657Feb 2, 2007Dec 6, 2011Andrew Robert LoachExercise machine
US8251879 *Jun 6, 2011Aug 28, 2012Matthew BinnsShoulder rehabilitation and exercise device
US20060003858 *Dec 29, 2004Jan 5, 2006Alibozek Timothy WBatting aid to measure swing power
US20080300511 *May 30, 2008Dec 4, 2008Matthew BinnsShoulder rehabilitation and exercise device
US20090036276 *Feb 2, 2007Feb 5, 2009Andrew Robert LoachExercise machine
US20110230800 *Sep 22, 2011Matthew BinnsShoulder rehabilitation and exercise device
WO2007099283A2 *Feb 2, 2007Sep 7, 2007Andrew Robert LoachImproved exercise machine
WO2007099283A3 *Feb 2, 2007Feb 7, 2008Andrew Robert LoachImproved exercise machine
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/229, 482/44, 482/903
International ClassificationA63B69/36, A63B21/22, A63B21/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63B21/225, Y10S482/903, A63B69/365, A63B21/15
European ClassificationA63B69/36D4M2, A63B21/15