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Publication numberUS3786233 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 15, 1974
Filing dateAug 18, 1972
Priority dateAug 18, 1972
Publication numberUS 3786233 A, US 3786233A, US-A-3786233, US3786233 A, US3786233A
InventorsBrehm J, Bumpus W
Original AssigneeFasco Industries
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Infrared heater and ventilator unit
US 3786233 A
Abstract
An infrared heater-ventilator unit comprises a housing adapted to be mounted in the ceiling of a room with the front of the housing substantially flush with the ceiling. Two infrared lamps are mounted on the front side of a strap that extends transversely across the housing. A motor and fan are mounted on the rear of the strap. The unit is wired so that one or both lamps may be illuminated by closing separate manually-operable switches. A normally-open thermostatic switch closes, if the temperature in the unit reaches a predetermined level, to actuate the motor to drive the fan to draw air into the housing through a front opening and vent it through a rear opening. If the temperature in the unit exceeds this level a normally-closed thermostatic switch opens to break the circuit to the lamps and motor. A separate manually-operable switch permits closing the circuit to the motor to drive the fan, if it is only desired to ventilate the room.
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United States Patent [191 Bumpus et al.

' Jam-15, 1974- 1 INFRARED HEATER AND VENTILATOR 3,163.366 12/1964 Schruith $131.] 240/47 x 2,9l9,338 12/1959 Covault et al. 219/376 X UNIT I [75] Inventors: gigfkgifigtiigfig? Brehm Primary Examiner-Anthony Bartis 'Att0rneyB. Edward Shlesinger et al. [73] Assignee: Fasco lndustries, lnc., Rochester,

a I [57 ABSTRACT [22] Filed? 7 An infrared heater-ventilatoruiiit comprisesa housing 21 1 231,7 adapted to be mounted in the ceiling of a room with the front of the housing substantially flush with the ceiling. Two infrared lamps are mounted on the front [52] 219/343 98/40DL 219/220 side of a strap that extends transversely across the 21-9/342 219/352 219/358' 240/2 240/47 housing. A motor and fan are mounted on the rear of [51'] 'f Cl H05) 1/02 FZIV 29/00 F24f 7/00 the strap. The unit is wired so that one or both lamps [58] Field of Search 219/220, 339, 342,v may be illuminatedv by closing Separate manua|1y 3 operable switches. A normally-open thermostatic 363, 370, 369; 240/2-V 47, 78 78 H? switch closes, if the temperature in the unit reaches 'a' 98/40 DL predetermined level, to actuate the motor to drive the fan to draw air into the housing through a front op'en- [56] References C'ted ing and vent it through a rear opening. lfthetempera- UNITED STATES PATENTS ture in the unit exceeds this level a normally-closed 3,692,977 9 1972 Duh el er a1, 21 X thermostatic switch opens to break the circuit to the 2,614,202 10/1952 Jordan 219/358 X lamps and motor. A separate manually-operable 3.63 .306 972 Bumpus 219/343 X switch permits closing the circuit to the motor to drive 3375.316 '2/1959 Ford i 219/361 X the fan, if it is only desired to ventilate the room. 2,800,563 7/1957 Browne et al.. 219/342 X 3.068.341 12/1962 Ortiz et a1 219/220 6 Claims, 3 Drawing Figures fl/azmosmr 2a r/mzmsmr I5 32 26 34 FAN M070? Q 20 24 48 /NF?fl/?ED 3411/0 321m LAMP ,0

INFRARED HEATER AND VENTILATOR UNIT The present invention relates to combination heaterventilators. and more particularly to an infrared heaterventilator unit of the type adapted to be mounted in the ceiling or wall of a bathroom.

In known infrared heater-ventilator units, heating is effected by one or more infrared lamps and a circulating fan for blowing air across the lamps into the room; and ventilation has been achieved by sucking air from the room. With known construct-ions, separate motors are required to drive the blower which blows air over the lamps into the room, and for sucking air from the room to achieve ventilation. The blower also functions to circulate air inside the housing of the unit to provide cooling action when internal temperatures in the unit reach the maximum safely allowed.

A primary object of the present invention is to provide a combination heater-ventilator unit requiring only one motor, and eliminating a separate motor for the blower, but still providing the needed cooling action of circulating air to keep the internal housing temperature at a safe degree.

Another object of the invention is to provide an improved unit of the character described with which the infrared heating lamp or lamps and the ventilator can be used separately and may be in operation either when the lamp or lamps are on, or are off.

Other objects of the invention will be apparent hereinafter from the specification and from the recital of the appended claims, particularly when read in conjunction with the accompanying drawing.

The objects of the invention have been achieved by employing in a heater-ventilator unit of the type described, a single motor both for driving a fan for cool-. ing the infrared heating lamps, and for ventilating the room in which the unit is mounted. At least two thermostats are mounted in the housing of the unit for automatically and selectively operating the fan, when the infrared lamps are energized. One thermostat controls the fan motor only, and the other controls both the fan motor and the lamps, and functions as a back-up control incase the first thermostat malfunctions.

In the drawing:

FIG. 1 is a vertical sectional view illustrating a combination heaterventilator unit built according to one embodiment of this invention; I

FlG. 2 is a wiring diagram illustrating one manner in which the unit may be wired for operation when one lamp is employed in the unit; and" FIG. 3 is a wiring diagram illustrating how the unit may be wired when two infrared lamps are employed in the unit.

Referring now to the drawing, denotes generally the housing for the unit. This may be oblong in cross section, and has four side walls 11, of which only three appear in the figure FIG. 1, and a top wall 12. The bottom of the housing is closed by a cover plate 14. Secured by angle brackets to opposed side walls of the housing is an elongate bar or strap 16. Fastened to the underside of this strap 16 are two conventional lamp sockets 18 for holding infrared lamps 20, which can be turned on or off by a suitably located wall switch 40 (FIG. 2). Openings 22 are provided in the cover plate 14 through which the lamps project.

The strap 16 is bent downwardly intermediate its ends, as shown clearly in FIG. 1 to provide a mounting for a conventional electric motor 24, which can be turned on or off, separatelyfrom the lamps by a suitably located wall switch 56 (FIG. 2). Secured to the armature shaft 26 of this motor is a conventional fan 28. An openi 30 in one wall 11 of the housing permits exhausting air from the housing.

Mounted on the strap 16 adjacent opposite sides of the housing are two thermostats 32 and 34, respectively.

The thermostat 34 controls operations of motor 24. When the temperature in the housing l0 rises above a predetermined degree the thermostat 34 operates to turn the motor 24 on to cause fan 28 to draw air through openings 22 to ventilate and cool the unit.

Referring now to FIG. 2, one way is shown in which the unit may be wired to accomplish its purpose. Power.

is supplied to the unit through the main lines L, and L which are connected to an alternating current power source. For heating the room inwhich the unit 10 is in: stalled, the manually-operated switch 40 is closed. When this is done, lamp 20 is connected to the power source, the circuit then being made from the line L through line 42, now-closed switch 40, line 44, thermostat 32, which is normally closed, line 46, line 48, lamp 20, line 50 and line L When only the lamp is on and the internal temperature in the housing 10 increases, the normally-open preset thermostat 34 will sense the rise in the tempera ture, and will be actuated, and close a circuit to the fan motor 24 from line L, through closed switch 40, line 44, thermostat 32, line 46,'now-closed thermostatic switch 34, line 52, line 54 to motor 24, and line 36 to line L This will cause the motor 24 to drive the fan 28 and suck air into the housing through the openings 22 in the cover 14, past the strap 16, and out the opening 30. This will provide air circulation to cool the interior of the housing. When the internal temperature of' the housing is lowered to a predetermined degree, the thermostat 34 will shift back to its open position toopen the circuit and turn the ventilator motor 24 off. On and Off cycling of the automatic fan delay thermostat 34 will continue as long as the lamp or lamps is or are On and produce excessive heat If for any reason the automatic fan delay thermostat 34 should fail, or become defective, the second normally-closed preset thermostat 32 in the circuit will sense the abnormal rise in the internal temperature of the housing and open automatically to switch off both the ventilator and the lamp circuits until the temperature in the housing cools to a predetermined degree. When this lower temperature is reached, the thermostat 32 will close again and energize the unit. The ON and OFF cycling of the lamps and ventilator motor by the second thermostat 32, acting as a limit control, will continue, thus giving the cue that service to the fan delay thermostat 34 is required.

When only ventilation of a room is desired, and not heating thereof, the switch-40 is opened, and the switch 56 is closed. Then the circuit is from the main line L, through the now-closed switch 56, the line 54, to the motor, and from the motor through the line 36 to main line L One way in which the unit may be wired where two lamps 20 are used, is shown in FIG. 3. Here switches 40, 40 control lamps 20. When one lamp is to be used, the switch 40 is closed. The circuit is then made from line L, through this switch, the lines 60 and 60 lefthand lamp 20 and through lines 62 and 63 and thermostatic switch 32 and line 64 to main line L This puts left-hand lamp 20 on. When only this single light is on the unit will dissipate its own heat. Therefore, the thermostat 34 and motor 24 arenot required to operate.

When full heat is desired the right-hand lamp 20, as well as the left-hand lamp, is put on. This is done by closing switch 40' which makes a circuit from line L, through line 60", right-hand lamp 20, and lines 62, 63 and thermostat 32 and line 64 to main line L If the unit heats up excessively with the two lights on, thermostat 34 shifts to closed position making a circuit from main line L through the switch blade 40, lines 60 and 66, now-closed thermostat 34, lines 68 and 70; motor 24, line 72, and line 64 to main line L If the thermostat 34 fails, and the unit continues to heat, the safety thermostat 32 opens, breaking the circuit to the fan motor 24 and to the lights, and will not close again until the unit has cooled down again. If the lamps and ventilator motor continue to cycle ON and OFF, it will be obvious that something is wrong, and that repair or replacement of thermostat 34 is required.

With the arrangement illustrated in FIG. 3, if ventilation only, as opposed to heating or the cooling of the unit is desired, thw switch 56 is closed. This closes a circuit from line L through switch 56, lines 68 and 70, motor 24, line 72, and line 64 to main line L While the invention has been described-in connection with specific embodiments thereof, it will be understood that it is capable of further modification; and this application is intended to cover any modifications of the invention that come within the scope of the invention, the disclosure, or the limits of the appended claims.

Having thus described our invention, what we claim l. A combination heater-ventilator unit, comprising a housing adapted to be mounted in a wall of a room with its front facing outward and having an opening in its front extending to the exterior of the housing, and an opening adjacent its rear,

a strap extending transversely across said housing intermediate its front and rear,

a lamp socket mounted on the front side of said strap and adapted to hold an infrared lamp in alignment with the first-named opening,

a fan disposed between said strap and the rear of said housing,

a motor mounted in said housing for driving said fan and a first electric circuit for supplying power only to said motor to drive said fan, and including a first manually operable switch for closing and opening said first circuit, and

a second circuit energizable independently of said first switch to supply power to said socket and selectively to said motor,

said second circuit including a second manually operable switch, a normally-open thermostatic switch responsive to the temperature within said housing and which closes automatically to connect said motor in said second circuit, when the temperature in said housing rises to a first predetermined level, and opens automatically when the temperature in said housing has been lowered to a predetermined degree, thereby to cause said fan to draw air into said housing through said first-named opening and to exhaust air through said second-named opening, when said thermostatic switch is closed, thereby to ventilate said housing.

2. A combination heater-ventilator unit according to claim 1, including a second, normally-closed thermostatic switch in said second circuit responsive to the temperature within said housing and operative, when the temperature in said housing rises above said first predetermined level, to open and deenergize said second circuit.

3. A combination heater-ventilator unit as claimed in claim 1, wherein said motor is mounted on to rear of said strap, and said fan is mounted on the armature shaft of said motor.

4. A combination heater-ventilator unit, comprising a housing adapted to be mounted in a wall of a room with its front facing outwardly and having an opening through its front extending to the exterior of said housing and an opening at its rear for venting the housing,

a strap extending transversely across said housing intermediate its front and rear,

two lamp sockets mounted on the front side of said strap and adapted to hold infrared lamps,

a fan disposed between said strap and the rear of said housing,

a motor mounted in said housing on the rear of said strap for driving said fan to draw air through said front opening and exhaust through said rear opening,

first electric circuit means for connecting said lamps .to an electric power source including two separate manually-operable switches operable independently of one another, electric conductors connecting said lamps with said two switches, respectively, a normally-closed thermostatic switch responsive to the temperature within said housing, and common conducting means for connecting each of said lamps through said thermostatic switch to said power source, and

second electric circuit means for supplying power from said source to said motor including a normally-open thermostatic switch responsive to the temperature within said housing for connecting said motor to one of said two separate manuallyoperable switches, and operative to close and energize said motor whenever said one switch is closed and the temperature in said housing exceeds a predetermined level.

5. A combination heater-ventilator unit as claimed in claim 4, having a third manually-operable switch for connecting said motor directly to said power source.

6. A combination heater-ventilator unit as claimed in claim 4, wherein said normally-closed thermostatic switch is adjusted to open at a temperature greater than said predetermined level.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2614202 *May 25, 1950Oct 14, 1952Otto Jordan PaulAir conditioning apparatus
US2800563 *Mar 1, 1954Jul 23, 1957Browne James HRadiant space heater
US2875316 *Dec 9, 1957Feb 24, 1959Emerson Pryne CompanyCombined heating and ventilating unit
US2919338 *Apr 1, 1958Dec 29, 1959Covault Darrell WElectric furnace
US3068341 *Mar 28, 1960Dec 11, 1962Grant CuthbertCeiling light heater
US3163366 *Jun 26, 1961Dec 29, 1964Mc Graw Edison CoControlled cooled gaseous discharge luminaire
US3636306 *Apr 23, 1970Jan 18, 1972Fasco IndustriesInfrared heater and ventilator unit
US3692977 *Dec 23, 1970Sep 19, 1972Panacon CorpCompact combination infra-red heating and ventilating unit
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3958100 *Jan 11, 1974May 18, 1976Ventrola Manufacturing CompanyMeans for preventing heat build-up in a wall-mounted room ventilator
US4191875 *Nov 10, 1977Mar 4, 1980Cunningham Ronald JFan speed control used in induction cooking apparatus
US4930054 *Dec 9, 1988May 29, 1990Nutone, Inc.Dual cone recessed lighting fixture
US5021932 *May 17, 1989Jun 4, 1991Fasco Industries, Inc.Safety device for combined ventilator/light unit
US5231690 *Mar 12, 1991Jul 27, 1993Ngk Insulators, Ltd.Wafer heaters for use in semiconductor-producing apparatus and heating units using such wafer heaters
US5490228 *Mar 23, 1993Feb 6, 1996Ngk Insulators, Ltd.Heating units for use in semiconductor-producing apparatuses and production thereof
US5922227 *Jun 11, 1996Jul 13, 1999Mcmurtrie; DallasPortable low wattage electric heater
US6003242 *Jan 9, 1998Dec 21, 1999Carley; Joseph C.Portable heater
US7133604Oct 20, 2005Nov 7, 2006Bergstein David MInfrared air heater with multiple light sources and reflective enclosure
US7267462 *Jun 9, 2005Sep 11, 2007Daniel Joseph CroninLight bar defogger
US7470043Sep 7, 2006Dec 30, 2008Hunter Fan CompanyVentilation fan and light
US7474842Aug 11, 2006Jan 6, 2009Bergstein David MThermal detonator with multiple light sources and reflective enclosure
US7500760Mar 4, 2007Mar 10, 2009Hunter Fan CompanyLight with heater
US7717775 *Jun 9, 2006May 18, 2010M+W Zander Holding AgFilter for suspended particles, especially for use in clean rooms
US7731816 *Feb 15, 2007Jun 8, 2010Ingersoll Machine Tools, Inc.System and method for heating carbon fiber using infrared radiation in a fiber placement machine
US7845831Apr 22, 2008Dec 7, 2010Hunter Fan CompanyLight with heater
US7914163May 14, 2008Mar 29, 2011Hunter Fan CompanyVentilation fan and light
US20130078902 *Sep 23, 2011Mar 28, 2013Chen-Yu ChungPendent Lamp Having An Air Conditioning Function
WO1980000485A1 *Aug 29, 1979Mar 20, 1980C VivianRadiant heating system using partitioned lighting plenums
WO2002097340A1 *Oct 12, 2001Dec 5, 2002Cheol-Hwan ChoFan-shaped far-infrared heater
Classifications
U.S. Classification392/416, 219/220, 454/338, 362/92, 454/293, 362/253
International ClassificationF24H3/04, H05B3/00
Cooperative ClassificationH05B3/008, F24H3/0411
European ClassificationF24H3/04B2, H05B3/00L2B
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jan 21, 1983AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: FASCO INDUSTRIES, INC., A CORP. OF NY
Owner name: HS DEECO, INC., A CORP. OF DE
Effective date: 19820830
Jan 21, 1983AS01Change of name
Owner name: FASCO INDUSTRIES, INC., 601 N. FEDERAL HWY., BOCA
Owner name: HS DEECO INC.
Effective date: 19820802
Jan 21, 1983ASAssignment
Owner name: FASCO INDUSTRIES, INC., 601 N. FEDERAL HWY., BOCA
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:HS DEECO INC.;REEL/FRAME:004094/0501
Effective date: 19820802
Owner name: HS DEECO, INC., A CORP. OF DE
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:FASCO INDUSTRIES, INC., A CORP. OF NY;REEL/FRAME:004094/0499
Effective date: 19820830
Owner name: HS DEECO, INC., A CORP. OF DE, STATELESS
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:FASCO INDUSTRIES, INC., A CORP. OF NY;REEL/FRAME:004094/0499