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Publication numberUS3786612 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 22, 1974
Filing dateNov 17, 1970
Priority dateNov 17, 1970
Publication numberUS 3786612 A, US 3786612A, US-A-3786612, US3786612 A, US3786612A
InventorsBaker W
Original AssigneeBaker W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Angle connectors for modular beam structures
US 3786612 A
Abstract
Angle connectors are provided for modular box beam building members. The connectors have two opposed pairs of substantially parallel support members, attached to and extending from a base member, one support member of each pair being disposed substantially in alignment with one support member of the opposite pair, and at an angle thereto corresponding to the angle of the connection to be made.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

[4 1 Jan. 22, 1974 United. States Patent Baker Keliehor 287/189 36 ANGLE CONNECTORS FOR MODULAR 3,357,727 12/1967 Finkenstein et al. BEAM'STRUCTURES 3,510,985 5/1970 3,272,582 9/1966 Anderson et a]. [76] Inventor: William H. Baker, 403 Loudonville 3 392 947 7 9 Rd., Albany, NY.

Nov. 17, 1970 Primary Examiner-Jordan Franklin [22] Filed:

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5 References Ci d support member of each pair being disposed substan- UNITED STATES PATENTS tially in alignment with one support member of the opposite pair, and at an angle thereto corresponding to the angle of the connection to be made.

287/l89.36 H Chill 287/189 36 H Goose......,........................ 287/54 A 5 Claims, 3 Drawing Figures 3,429,602 2/1969 Dirilgen..................... 3561801 2/1971 3,592,493 7/1971 ANGLE CONNECTORS FOR MODULAR BEAM STRUCTURES 'Efforts by the building industry to reduce costs and increase the speed. of building has led to the development of a variety of modular units'forconstruction of the various parts of a building. Basic units in modular building construction are the box beams which are used for the structural supports both of the sides and of the roof as well as the main parts of the building. These structural supports can be in a variety of configurations, but box beams are generally preferred because of their greater rigidity and strength, as .well as light weight. Moreover, they are susceptible of being prepared by extrusion techniques, which keep costs down.

The connection of modular box beam building members at the joints between the sides and roof of the building and at the peak of the roof presents special problems which are difficult to resolve. Since the box,

beam is essentially rectangular in cross-section,,it is not easy to fit such beamstogether in tight angled joints of sufficient rigidity, with all such joints precisely at the same angle, without considerable mechanical manipulation and fitting together at the building site. Hand fitting of joints runs costs construction costs of however, and is undesirable.

In accordance with the invention, angle connectors for modular box beam building members are provided, comprising two opposed pairs of substantially parallel support members, attached to and extending from a base member, preferably from opposite sides thereof. One support member of each pair and preferably both are substantially in alignment with one or both support members of the opposite pair,.and at an angle thereto corresponding to the angle of the connection to be made. The parallel support members are adapted to fit within the box beam support members, closely abutting the interior wall of opposite sides thereof, and the connectors can be attached to the box 'beam members, such as by nuts, rivets, bolts or other types of connection, to perfect the joint. The box beams can be fitted together by the connectors without modification of their ends to provide a closely abutting fit, but if a tight joint is desired, it is preferable to cut either or both of the aluminum box beam ends so that they are closely abutting from one side to the other of the connector. This is best done either by cutting one end of one beam at the connecting angle or, preferably by cutting the ends of both beams at the same half angle of the connecting angle, for an end-abutting fit. For a U- connection, the beams do not abut, and no fitting is.

necessary.

The support members can extend from the base member at any angle relative to each other, according to the connection to be made, ranging from or 180, i.e., a straight angle, to 360, i.e., in a U-connection, and at any acute or obtuse angle between these extremes. A peak angle is usually from 45 to 135, and an eave angle from 1 to 160, but these are merely illustrative and not the only angles that can be used.

The support members can take any desired configuration. They can, for example, be flat plates, corresponding in width to the interior width of the box beam at each side, for a tight press fit. While it is unnecessary to provide cross supports between the extending ends of the pairs of support members, sufficient support usually being provided by the base member, especially if the support members are short, cross-supports can of course be used for greater rigidity and to ensure a tight fit at the extending ends, against the inside wall of the box beam.

The support members can also be formed by box beams for greater strength, and if the interior of the box beam at its end is wholly unobstructed, the pairs of support members can be taken together as a box beam whose external dimensions are sufficiently small so that the box beam connector fits within the box beam building member. Other configurations will be apparent to those skilled in the art from this description.

The length of the support members, i.e., how far they extend from the base member, is determined by the dimensions of the box beam. A wide box beam requires a longer support member, for great strength and rigidity. The dimensions of the base member similarly are determined by the box beam. The base member must be strong enough to hold the support members rigidly together, after the joint has been completed.

The base member can be a single block or bar extending between the support members and rigidly attached thereto, or several such blocks or bars, in reinforcing relationship. If the box beams are wide, several base members may be desirable, and they can be reinforced by cross-struts therebetween, for greater rigidity, if desired.

The box beam and the connector can be provided with matching apertures along their overlapping lengths, to facilitate the attachment of one to the other with nuts, screws, bolts or rivets, without the necessity of drilling or hole-punching during the assembly of the units. A plurality of apertures should be provided to afford greater versatility in locating the final attachment over the length of the connector.

The connectors can be made of any material that provides sufficient strength and rigidity for the building structure. Usually the connectors will be made of metal, and especially metals that are capable of being shaped by casting or extrusion, such as aluminum or titanium alloys. They can also be made of steel, brass or bronze. Plastic connectors can be used, especially when the box beams themselves are of plastic material. In this case, the members would desirably be made of the same plastic material as the box beam. A variety of plastic materials can be used, such as polyamides, polyethylene, polypropylene, polystyrene, polytetrafluorethylene, polytrifluorochloroethylene, polycarbonate, polyesters, phenol-formaldehyde, ureaformaldehyde, and melamine-formaldehyde resins, and polyallyl resins.

Preferred embodiments of the invention are shown in the drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 represents an isometric view of one embodiment of peak connector in accordance with the invention, ready for installation in the ends of two box beams which are to be joined together as a peak or ridge connection.

FIG. 2 is a cross-section through the peak or ridge joint, after completion of the attachment of the beams to the connector, and

FIG. 3 represents an isometric view of an embodiment of eave connector in accordance with the invention, with two box beams in position to be connected in an eave connection.

The connector 1 shown in FIG. 1 has two opposed pairs of substantially parallel steel support members,

members 2, 3 constituting one pair, and members 4, 5 constituting another. Each member of these opposed pairs is actually part of a metal strip bent at 6, 7 at the ridge angle. A base member 8, which is made of a short steel block, has a conforming angle at the ends for reception of the interior face of the metal strips, and the strips are welded to the block. Each support member 2, 3, 4, 5 is provided with three rows of through apertures 9, ten apertures in each row.

The aluminum box beams 11, 12 are provided with a corresponding array of apertures 13 on each side which match with the apertures on the support members 2, 3, 4, 5 when the beams are fitted over the connector 1 into closely abutting end contact. It will be seen that the abutting edges 14, 15 of each beam are cut at an angle which is equal to one-half the angle between the opposed pairs of parallel support members of the connector.

Assembly of the box beams 11, 12 to the connector 1 is quite simple. The open ends of the box beams l1, 12 are pushed over the connector until their edges l4, 15 are abutting. Bolts, rivets or screws 16 are then inserted through the mating apertures 9, 13 to lock the two together. The resulting structure is extremely rigid. The uniformity of the connectors ensures that all of the ridge joints are at the same angle and in substantially the same position, thus making the roof peak construction very simple, indeed, to assemble.

The embodiment of connector 20 shown in FIG. 3 is in the form of two pairs of small box beams whose widths correspond to the interior widths of the aluminum box beams 23, 24 to be connected. Four box beam support members 25, 26, 27, 28 are fitted together at their ends by welding to the base member 29, at the angle of the peak or eave.

The abutting ends of these box beams are at one-half the eave angle, so that they are in reinforcing contact where they meet, at the base 29. The surfaces of the box beam support members 25, 26, 27, 28 to be attached to the inner sides of box beam building members are flat, and the mating edges 30, 31 of the aluminum box beam members 23, 24 to be attached are squared off, and then are cut at one-half the eave angle. The box beam support members each have three rows of apertures 21 matching corresponding arrays of apertures 22 on beams 23, 24.

Assembly of the eave connection is in the same manner as the ridge connection. The connector 20 is slid into the open ends of the box beams 23, 24 until the ends of the beams are abutting, and attached thereto by rivets, screws or bolts through the mating apertures 21, 22. The result is an extremely rigid connection.

The angle connectors of the invention are useful in connecting ridges or peaks of roofs and eaves, and also side walls of buildings, which meet at any desired angle. The connector can even be in a U-shape, to hold double rows of wall or roof or floor beams together. For right-angle side wall joints, the two opposed pairs of parallel support members will of course be at right angles, but otherwise the construction is the same as that shown in FIGS. 1 to 3. The connectors can also be used for fiat roof eave constructions, in which the support members are also substantially at right angles to each other.

The connectors can be used with any type of box beam, whatever its internal configuration. If the box beam has internal cross supports, the type of connector shown in FIG. 1 is more versatile, because the support members are in the form of flat metal strips. If the interior of the box beam has a substantial open area, the box member type of connector shown in FIG. 3 may be more suitable, and may also provide a more rigid joint.

Having regard to the foregoing disclosure, the following is claimed as the inventive and patentablc embodiments thereof.

1. A building structure comprising two modular box beam building members interconnected by an angle connector comprising a pair of beam-supporting freestanding spaced-apart opposed substantially parallel unitary support members attached to and extending from opposite sides of a base member at an angle thereto, the support members being so shaped as to fit within an open end of the box beam connected thereto, and to closely abut the interior wall of opposite surfaces of said box beam, the longitudinal axes of the support members and the base member being substantially coplanar, the support members being at an angle to the base member corresponding to the angle of the connector, the end portions of the box beams and the support members having a plurality of transverse apertures in alignment, and fastening means extending through the apertures rigidly attaching the support members and the beams together, and the base member being a strong block rigid enough to hold the box beams rigidly in position in the structure.

2. A building structure in accordance with claim 1, in which at least one cross support member extends between the parallel support members in addition to the base member, for additional structural support.

3. A building structure in accordance with claim 1, in which the base member comprises a block extending between the pairs of support members and rigidly attached at its ends to side portions of the support members.

4. A building structure in accordance with claim 1, in which the support members are in the form of tubular members with each support member disposed substantially in alignment with the opposed support member and the support members extending from opposite sides of the base member, and connected thereto in a one piece structure.

5. A building structure in accordance with claim 1, in which the support members are in the form of metal strips with each support member disposed substantially in alignment with the opposed support member, and the support members extending from opposite sides of the base member, and connected thereto in a one piece structure.

UNITED STATES PAIENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent :3, D t d 12. 11181? certified that error appears in the above-identified patent id Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Columnl, line "runs costs construction costs of" should! be --runs costs of constructioz: up".

Column 2, line 6 "grea should be greater".

Column 2, line 35 "over" should be --a1o:ng-

Signed and Sealed this Third Day of August 1976 [SEAL] A ttesr:

RUTH C. MASON C. MARSHALL DANN llusring Officer Commissioner of Parents and Trademarks

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4222209 *Feb 27, 1978Sep 16, 1980Peterson Metal Products, Ltd.Cornerpiece for use in multiple pane window
US4315386 *Dec 13, 1979Feb 16, 1982Clarke Garry WPortal building structures
US4453855 *Aug 3, 1981Jun 12, 1984Thermetic Glass, Inc.Corner construction for spacer used in multi-pane windows
US4773192 *Aug 11, 1987Sep 27, 1988Ayrshire Metal Products (Daventry) Ltd.Building structures
US4930268 *Jul 27, 1988Jun 5, 1990Bator S.A., Societe AnonymeApparatus for assembling a roof frame with a post, for making framework and structures
US5059057 *Oct 5, 1990Oct 22, 1991Andrew GraefHigh strength, thin-walled, plastic tubes and connector combination and method of fabrication
US5178502 *May 24, 1991Jan 12, 1993Huck International, Inc.High strength blind bolt
US5213460 *May 27, 1992May 25, 1993Huck International, Inc.High strength blind bolt with uniform high clamp over an extended grip range
US5603592 *Oct 3, 1994Feb 18, 1997Huck International, Inc.High strength blind bolt with uniform high clamp over an extended grip range
US5651649 *Jul 7, 1995Jul 29, 1997Huck International, Inc.High strength torque type blind bolt with anti-rotation
US8322091 *Feb 9, 2010Dec 4, 2012Atwood Mobile Products, LlcWindow frame assembly with integral seals
US8899868 *Jun 7, 2010Dec 2, 2014Roger Blaine TrivetteMiter coupling and method
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US20110192091 *Feb 9, 2010Aug 11, 2011Mark L. SmithWindow frame assembly with integral seals
US20150121776 *Oct 21, 2014May 7, 2015Folding Holdings LlcFolding building
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EP0681064A2 *Apr 28, 1995Nov 8, 1995Bernd KleinCorner connection for a supporting system
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WO1990014522A1 *Apr 30, 1990Nov 29, 1990Christoph KaesbohrerBearer joint
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Classifications
U.S. Classification403/295, 52/639
International ClassificationF16B12/40, E04C3/40, F16B12/00, E04C3/38, F16B7/00
Cooperative ClassificationE04C3/40, F16B7/00, F16B12/40, F16B2012/443
European ClassificationE04C3/40, F16B12/40, F16B7/00