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Publication numberUS3786819 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 22, 1974
Filing dateOct 18, 1971
Priority dateOct 18, 1971
Publication numberUS 3786819 A, US 3786819A, US-A-3786819, US3786819 A, US3786819A
InventorsCantrell A
Original AssigneeCantrell A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus and method for treating hair
US 3786819 A
Abstract
A spacer for use in treating hair has an integral clamp for sealingly gripping a quantity of hair to be treated, a trough for holding the quantity of hair for applying a treat-ment material thereto, and an integral connector for selectively connecting the clamp to the trough. This spacer may be used in a method for treating hair having the steps of sealingly gripping a quantity of hair to be treated with a gripping device, holding the hair to be treated in an open trough, treating the hair in the open trough while permitting excess treating material to move toward the gripping device, and collecting the excess treating material within a cavity associated with the gripping device.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

nited States Patent [1 1 Cantrell 1 .Ian. 22, 197A APPARATUS AND METHOD FOR TREATING HAIR [22] Filed: Oct. 18, 1971 [21] Appl. No.: 189,959

[52] U.S. Cl. 132/9 [51] Int. Cl A45d 1/00 [58] Field of Search 132/7, 9

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,157,984 5/1939 .Hawgood 132/7 2,446,227 9/1948 Grant 132/7 FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 662,702 0/1938 Germany 132/9 Primary ExaminerLouis G. Mancene Assistant Examiner.l. Q. Lever Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Harvey B. Jacobson [5 7] ABSTRACT A spacer for use in treating hair has an integral clamp for sealingly gripping a quantity of hair to be treated, a trough for holding the quantity of hair for applying a treat-ment material thereto, and an integral connector for selectively connecting the clamp to the trough. This spacer may be used in a method for treating hair having the steps of sealingly gripping a quantity of hair to be treated with a gripping device, holding the hair to be treated in an open trough, treating the hair in the open trough while permitting excess treating material to move toward the gripping device, and collecting the excess treating material within a cavity associated with the gripping device.

9 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures PAIENIEBJMI 22 974 Audrey M Canine/f PATENIEBmzz 1914 3,786,819

sum 2 BF 2 Audrey M Cantrell IN ViiN'I'OK APPARATUS AND METHOD FOR TREATING HAIR BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention This invention relates to an apparatus and method for treating hair. Many people, especially women, periodically have only portions or strands of their hair bleached to a desired lightness instead of bleaching their entire head of hair. This technique is commonly known as frosting. The present invention is directed to novel apparatus and method for use by hair dressers, stylists, and beauticians for frosting, or applying the frosting technique to a persons hair.

2. Description of the Prior Art The most commonly used method for frosting hair at prsentinvolves covering the persons head with a cap constructed from a flexible material such as natural or synthetic rubber or some other synthetic material. This cap defines a plurality of small holes which may be, for example, approximately one-half inch apart. Strands of hair, or a portion of a head of hair, is pulled through these holes until hair is protruding on the outside of the cap. The hair which has been pulled through the holes in the cap is the hair upon which the treating material, such as a bleach, or frosting isapplied. This known frosting method has several disadvantages in that the process of pulling these hairs through the holes in the cap is very painful to the person who is undergoing the treatment, if the persons hair is of substantial length it becomes very difficult and time consuming to pull the hair through the perforated cap, the cap placed over the persons head has a tendency to shift or slip causing the hair to slip back through the holes and under the cap which may cause a section of the hair to be treated to be left untreated when the treatment process is applied, and there is always the danger when applying the treating material to the hair that a portion of the treating material will seep through the holes in the cap and treat portions of the hair not desired to be treated. The latter problem particularly may create an unnatural and inferior frosting effect.

Hair treating devices are also known which form a container and hair gripping device in an integral unit. Devices of this type may be found in, for example, U. S. Pat. No. 3,103,933 issued Sept. 17, 1963, to S. C. Sanzo, and U. S. Pat. No. 3,128,778, issued Apr. 14, 1964, to R. F. .I. Ricci et al. Present day hair treatments, however, require the application of, for example, a bleach to strands of the hair, followed by a shampooing of those strands, a drying step, and the application of a toner. Frequently, an additional bleaching step is required. The devices described in the U. S. Patents cited above, however, intend to confine the hair under treatment within a container where it becomes difficult tocarry out these various steps without unclamping the device and releasing the gripped hair. This would result in losing the original grouping, or bunching of the hair being treated, and would make is almost impossible to exactly group the hair under treatment in the same way.

Another problem encountered when using the devices of the U. S. Patents cited above, is that in recent years bleaches have been developed that are in the form of a creamy substance. When using these creamy bleaches, it is necessary in order to get a proper bleach that the substance be applied and gently worked into the hair with the operators hands. Further these creamy bleaches require that in order to .check the degree of bleach needed, it is necessary to remove a few of the strands of hair from the bleach and wipe them off with a towel so that a determination of the stage of frosting canbe made. Since the hair in the prior art devices is packed into a container, it would be almost impossible to use a cream bleach with these devices. In addition, the rather tight packing of the hair into the container of U. S. Pat. No. 3,103,933 would result in a uneven bleach.

Yet another problem with the prior art devices of the U. S. Patents cited above is that their bulk prevents them from being placed as close together on the head as is necesary for achieving a good frosting effect.

Another approach for applying hair treating liquid is to provide an integral member having a U-shaped spring with a deep trough on the end of one leg and a hair guide member attached to the end of the other leg. Such a device may be found, in example, U. S. Pat. No. 3,030,968, issued Apr. 24, 1962, to H. E. Oberstar et al. This arrangement, however, has the very definite disadvantage of losing the grouped hair after each application.

Finally, prior art devices are known which grip certain portions of the hair to separate them from the head in tinting operations. Such a device may be found in, for example, U. S. Pat. No. 1,637,781, issued Aug. 2, 1927, to F. J. Matheson. This type ofa clamp, however, is directed to dyeing the roots of hairs which have recently grown without dyeing the ends of the same hair which has previously been dyed. Thus, this type of hair clamp is not suitable for hair treating operations such as frosting.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION It is an object of the present invention to provide an apparatus and a method for treating hair that overcome the problems referred to above. Specifically, it is an object of the present invention to provide an apparatus and a method that permits hair groupings to be continuously gripped through several different applications, and for providing an open surface for applying the treating material.

These and other objects are achieved according to the present invention by providing apparatus having integral means for sealingly gripping a quantity of hair to be treated, integral means separate from the means for gripping for holding the quantity of hair for applying a treating material thereto, and integral means for selectively connecting the means for holding to the means for gripping.

In a preferred embodiment of the apparatus according to the present invention, the means for gripping is a clamp formed by a pair of hinged jaws with portions forming a sealed surface when the jaws are together, and a cup portion for receiving excess quantities of the treating material from the means for holding. The cup portion may be defined by the sealed surface and a wall extending perpendicular from the sealed surface. The wall defines a cavity with an opening opposite the sealed surface for passing the treating material into the cavity. Each of the pair of jaws defines a sealing edge where the jaws come together, and means may be arranged on the sealing edges for providing a tight seal and for protecting the hair.

The means for holding the hair may be, according to a preferred embodiment of the present invention, a

trough which defines an open surface for applying the treating material to the hair.

In a preferred embodiment of the present invention, the means for selectively connecting has a body portion defining a pair of slots. One slot is for selectively fitting onto a portion of the clamp wall, and the other slot is for selectively fitting onto a peripheral portion of the trough.

The method for treating hair according to the present invention has the steps of sealingly gripping a quantity of hair to be treated with a gripping device, holding the hair to be treated in an open trough, treating the hair in the open trough while permitting excess treating material to move toward the gripping device and collecting the excess treating material in a cavity associated with the gripping device.

These together with other objects and advantages which will bcome subsequently apparent reside in the details of construction and operation as more fully hereinafter described and claimed, reference being had to the accompanying drawings forming a part hereof, wherein like numerals refer to like parts throughout.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a schematic perspective view showing spacer according to the present invention in position on a human head.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of a spacer according to the present invention.

FIG. 3 is a sectional view taken generally along the line 33 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is an exploded perspective view showing the three separate elements making up a spacer according to the present invention.

FIGS. 5 and 6 are vertical end views of a connector for a spacer according to the present invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS FIG. 1 shows a perspective schematic representation of a human head 10 with a plurality of spacer 12 according to the present invention positioned in hair 14.

As can be seen on a larger scale in FIG. 2, each spacer 12 is made up of three integral parts: a clamp 16, which provides means for sealingly gripping a quantity of hair to be treated; a trough 18 which provides means for holding the quantity of hair for applying a treating material thereto; and a connector 20, which provides a means for selectively connecting trough 18 to clamp 16.

A locking device 22 is provided on clamp 16 for holding together jaws 24, 26 thereof. Jaws 24, 26 are hinged together at the end opposite locking device 22 as by a leaf-and-pin hinge 28. Clamp 16 may be, for example, molded in two pieces from a suitable known synthetic material. The two pieces may, for example, correspond to jaws 24, 26. The material selected for clamp 16 should be fairly rigid so that the hair will be firmly gripped and tightly sealed. In the alternative, clamp 16 could be molded as a single piece with an integral hinge (not shown).

FIG. 3 shows a section of a spacer 12. Jaws 24, 26 coact to form a sealed surface 30, and a cup portion 31 for receiving excess quantities of a treating material from trough 18. A wall 32 extends perpendicular from surface 30 and defines a cavity 34 with an opening 36 arranged opposite surface 30 for passing a treating material into cavity 34.

Connector 20 has a body portion 38 defining a pair of slots, 40, 42. Slot 40 is dimensioned for selectively fitting onto a, for example, portion 44 of wall 32, and slot 42 is dimensioned for selectively fitting onto a peripheral portion 46 of trough 18. A fit is preferrably selected between slots 40, 42 and portions 44,46 that will provide a rigid connection, but will permit easy removal and refitting. Further, the slots 40,42 and portions, 44,46 are preferably dimensioned so that, for example, portion 46 can fit into slot 40, and portion 44 can fit into slot 42.

Jaws 24, 26 each define a sealing edge 48 (FIGS. 3 and 4) where jaws 24, 26 come together to form the sealed surface 30. Sealing strips 50 may be mounted on edges 48 for providing a tight seal, and for protecting the hair. These strips may be constructed from a suitable, known sealing material, such as a synthetic or natural rubber, plastic or the like.

Locking device 22 may have a latch 52 and a keeper 54, preferrably molded integrally with jaws 24, 26.

It is to be understood that latch 52, keeper 54, and connector 16 could be mounted on a jaw 24, 26 other than the particular jaw shown in FIGS. 1-4 of the drawmgs.

The clamp 16 having dimensions of 2 inches by onehalf inch by one-half inch has been found satisfactory.

Trough 18 is preferrably longitudinally extended and given a concave or channel shape, as can best be seen in FIGS. 1, 2 and 4. Basically, trough 18 forms an open surface for holding the hair for applying a treating material thereto.

Trough 18 may also be constructed from a suitable, known synthetic material as by molding, but the material may be a substantially lighter or more flexible material than that used for clamp 16. A trough having dimensions of 4 inches by 2 inches has been found satisfactory.

FIGS. 5 and 6 show a configuration for a connector 20. Slot 40 is, for example, straight in order to mate with wall portion 44. If wall 32 was a shape other than rectangular, slot 40 would be shaped accordingly. In the same manner, slot 42 is shown curved to mate with portion 46 of trough 18.

The angle designated for A connectors 20 in FIGS. 5 and 6 may vary in order to adapt spaces 12 to different parts of head 10 by connecting trough 18 to assume a desirable angle for its position on head 10 (FIG. 1).

Connectors 20 may be constructed from a synthetic material similar to that of clamp 16 as by molding. A

connector 20 having dimensions of finch by 2 inches has been found satisfactory.

In operation, the spacer according to the present invention is placed on the hair 14 of a person undergoing treatment by first sealingly gripping a quantity of hair to be treated with a clamp 16. Up to 30 of spacers 12 can be used on one persons hair, the exact number depending upon the amount or magnitude of frosting desired. After a particular clamp 16 is in position in the hair 14, a connector 20 having the appropriate angle A for that part of the head is attached to clamp 16 by moving a slot 40, 42 onto a portion of wall 32. Finally, a trough 18 may be connected to clamp 16 via connector 20 by fitting peripheral portion 46 into the other of the connector slots 40, 42. The strands of hair for that particular spacer 12 are then positioned in trough 18 to be held thereby. The hair can now be treated with a treating material such as a known bleach, while the excess material is permitted to move toward the clamp 16 to be collected by cup portion 31 in cavity 34. Thus, sealed surface 30 prevents the treating material from getting onto undesired portions of the hair 14.

The spacer 12 according to the present invention is very easy to use, as when an operator parts off a strip of hair with one hand, the clamp 16 can be picked up and put in place and closed easily with the other hand. If the hair to be treated is short, the hair can be treated without the trough 18 being connected to the clamp 16. The hair is preferrably treated starting at the nape of the neck. The first row is bleached from left to right, then the next higher row of clamps 16 is provided with connectors 20 and troughs 18, and is bleached. On the lower part of the head, connectors 20 would preferably be used which have a very acute angle A, while on the side and back of the head, connectors 20 may be used that have an angle A approximately close to 186 degrees. Close toit h e top and on t op of the head, connectors 20 would be arranged so as to be slanted downward, as can be seen from FIG. 1. A decision on what angle and orientation for connector 20 to use is determined by which connector will place trough 18 at an angle permitting easy application of the treating material.

Spacers 12 are always open with the hair available for manipulation and testing at all times. When for example, a bleaching treatment application is finished, the person receiving the treatment may be moved to the shampoo bowl, the trough l3 and connectors 20 removed, and the hair shampooed and dried. The connectors 20 and trough 18 may than be replaced on the clamp 16, which remains in position at all times, for a final application of, for example, a toner. In a typical treatment, the toner application is finished in, for example, 30 minutes, andthe trough 18, connectors 20, and clamp 16 may now be all removed and a final shampoo and dressing of the hair performed.

The foregoing is considered as illustrative only of the principles of the invention. Further, since numerous modifications and changes will readily occur to those skilled in the art, it is not desired to limit the invention to the exact construction and operation shown and described and accordingly all suitable modifications and equivalents may be resorted to, falling within the scope of the invention.

What is claimed as new is as follows:

1. Apparatus for'use in treating hair, comprising in combination:

a. means for sealingly gripping a quantity of hair to be treated;

b. means separate from the means for gripping and defining an open surface for holding strands of and applying a treating material to the gripped quantity of hair; and

c. means for removably connecting the means for holding to the means for gripping.

2. Apparatus as defined in claim 1, wherein the means for gripping includes a clamp formed by a pair of hinged jaws with portions forming a sealed surface when the jaws are together, and a cup portion for receiving excess quantities of the treating material from the means for holding.

3. Apparatus as defined in claim 2, wherein said cup portion is defined by the sealed surface and a wall extending perpendicular from said sealed surface, said wall defining a cavity with an opening arranged opposite said sealed surface for passing the treating material into the cavity.

4. Apparatus as defined in claim 3, wherein the means for holding includes a trough which defines the open surface for applying a treating material to the hair.

5. Apparatus for use in treating hair, comprising, in combination:

a. means for sealingly gripping a quantity of hair to be treated, the means for gripping including a clamp formed by a pair of hinged jaws with portions forming a sealed surface when the jaws are together, and a cup portion for receiving excess quantities of the treating material from the means for holding, said cup portion being defined by the sealed surface and a wall extending perpendicular from said sealed surface, said wall defining a cavity with an opening arranged opposite said sealed surface for passing the treating material into the cavy;

b. means separate from the means for gripping for holding the quantity of hair for applying a treating material to the hair, the means for holding including a trough which defines an open surface for applying a treating material to the hair; and

0. means for selectively connecting the means for holding to the means for gripping, said means for selectively connecting including a body portion defining a pair of slots, one for selectively fitting onto a portion of said wall and one for selectively fitting onto a perpheral portion of said trough.

6. Apparatus as defined in claim 2, wherein said clamp includes means integral with the jaws for holding said jaws together.

7. Apparatus as defined in claim 2, wherein each of said pair of jaws definesa sealing edge where said jaws come together, and means arranged on the sealing edges for providing a tight seal and for protecting the hair.

8. Apparatus as defined in claim 1, wherein the means for holding includes a trough which defines the open surface for applying a treating material to the hair.

9. Apparatus for use in treating hair, comprising, in combination:

a. means for sealingly gripping a quantity of hair to be treated;

b. means separate from the means of gripping for holding the quantity of hair for applying a treating material to the hair; and

c. means for selectively connecting the means for holding to the means for gripping, said means for selectively connecting including a body portion defining a pair of slots, one for selectively fitting onto a portion of said means for gripping and one for selectively fitting onto a peripheral portion of a means for holding.

* k =l I? UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECHN patent 3,786,819 Dated January 22, 1974 lnventofls) Audrey M. Cantrell (Hughes) It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

The Inventor's name should be Audrey M. Hughes Signed and sealed this 30th day of April 1971;.

(SEAL) Attest:

EDWARD ILFLETCHERJRQ C. MARSHALL DAMN Attesting Officer Commissioner of Patents o FORM PO-1050 (10-69) V USCOMM-DC 60376-P69 U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFiCE: I959 0-366-334

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2157984 *Jun 15, 1936May 9, 1939Hawgood Harvey RMethod of winding and winding apparatus
US2446227 *Jun 11, 1945Aug 3, 1948Curtis Helene Ind IncMethod of permanent waving of hair
DE662702C *Jul 20, 1938Karl FegerKlammer zum Nachwuchsfaerben und Blondieren der Haare
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3921647 *Oct 2, 1974Nov 25, 1975Fisher Karol CApparatus for isolating and treating selected hair strands
US4750500 *Sep 3, 1986Jun 14, 1988Jerilyn AllenDevice for facilitating hair styling using plural tints
US5156172 *Nov 29, 1991Oct 20, 1992Paul StraubingerDevice and method for cosmetically treating hair
Classifications
U.S. Classification132/270
International ClassificationA45D19/02, A45D19/00
Cooperative ClassificationA45D19/0016, A45D19/02
European ClassificationA45D19/02, A45D19/00B2