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Publication numberUS3787051 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 22, 1974
Filing dateAug 28, 1970
Priority dateAug 28, 1970
Publication numberUS 3787051 A, US 3787051A, US-A-3787051, US3787051 A, US3787051A
InventorsDyke Johns H Van
Original AssigneeDyke Johns H Van
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Continuous fiber tennis racquet
US 3787051 A
Abstract
A tennis racquet composed entirely, except for the strings and a leather handle cover, of resin impregnated glass fibres approximately 25 percent of which extend unbrokenly up one handle, around the bow including the throat, around the head and down the other handle, approximately 50 percent of which extend up one handle around the head and then down the other handle, and approximately 25 percent of which extend up one handle member, across the throat and then down the other handle member. Short fibres are positioned across the throat to make the throat contain a number of fibres equal to that of any other portion of the racquet.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

H110 Johns States Patent 1191 1 1 CONTINUOUS FIBER TENNIS RACQUET [22] Filed: Aug. 28, I970 21 App1.No.: 67,882

[52] US. Cl 2 73/73 F, 273/D1G. 7 [51] Int. Cl A63b 49/10 [58] Field of Search 273/67 R, 73, DIG. 7; 124/23 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,980,158 4/1961 Meyer 273/73 F 3,483,055 12/1969 Eshbaugh 273/73 F X 2,878,020 3/1959 Robinson 273/73 F 2,980,158 4/1961 Meyer 273/73 F FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 577,560 6/1924 France 273/73 F 962,312 12/1949 France 273/73 K 1,310,470 10/1962 Francelm, 273/73 D 307,157 3/1929 Great Britain 273/73 K 255,039 10/1927 Italy 273/73 K 848,826 8/1970 Canada 273/73 F 17,462 5/1934 Australia 273/73 F AWFQ'G/Vflfffi 50 FEE/Q5 Jan. 22, 1974 Primary Examiner-Richard C. Pinkham Assistant Examiner Richard J. Apley Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Lyon & Lyon [57] ABSTRACT A tennis racquet composed entirely, except for the strings and a leather handle cover, of resin impregnated glass fibres approximately 25 percent of which extend unbrokenly up one handle, around the bow including the throat, around the head and down the other handle, approximately 50 percent of which extend up one handle around the head and then down the other handle, and approximately 25 percent of which extend up one handle member, across the throat and then down the other handle member. Short fibres are positioned across the throat to make the throat contain a number of fibres equal to that of any other portion of the racquet.

3 Claims, 8 Drawing Figures CONTINUOUS FIBER TENNIS RACQUET INTRODUCTION This invention relates to a tennis racquet and more particularly to such a racquet the body of which is composed entirely of glass fibres impregnated with a thermosetting resin. For improved strength it is desirable to form the racquet, so far as it is possible, of continuous unbroken fibres. However, due to the peculiar shape of a tennis racquet it is not possible to achieve this ideal. Hence this invention is in essence an attempt to use in the structure of a racquet as many continuous unbroken fibres as possible and yet still make a balanced racquet having a uniform cross-section in all parts of the bow, even including the throat.

This object and others will be apparent from the following description in which:

FIG. 1 is a plan view of a pair of molds suitable for making the racquet of this invention, the molds being shown in their open position.

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary cross-section taken along line 2-2 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a view similar to 'FIG. 2, but showing the mold filled and closed.

FIGS. 4-6 is a diagram of the position in which approximately 50 percent of the glass fibres are laid in the mold.

FIGS. 5-7 is a diagram of the position in which approximately 25 percent of the glass fibres are laid in the mold.

FIG. 8 is a diagram of the position in which approximately 25 percent of the glass fibres are laid in the mold.

Referring now more particularly to the drawings, FIG. 1 illustrates a mold formed in two halves l0 and 11 hinged together by a hinge 12. Each half 10 and 11 is provided with a groove 13 or 14 which grooves trace the outline of a tennis racquet frame. That is to say, each groove has a head portion 15, a throat portion 16 and two handle portions 17 and 18.

As known in the art, glass fibers are arranged with about 204 unidirectionally extending filaments in a unit known as a sliver. The term E glass designates the composition and stands for electrical" versus chemical". The term K represents a filament-diameter of about 0.00055 inch. (See Handbook of Reinforced plastics of the SP1, Oleesky and Mohr, pub. 1964 by Reinhold Pub. Corp, pp 117-166).

Glass fibres impregnated with a flexible epoxy resin of the amine type and B staged to a semicured state are laid in the grooves 13 and 1-4 in the following manner:

Bundles of E glass fibres of the K fibre diameter are used with approximately 60 slivers to the bundle. The first step comprises laying 50 bundles into the molds in the pattern shown in FIGS. 4-6, that is to say, up one handle, around the headand down the other handle. The second step comprises laying bundles into the molds in the pattern shown in FIGS. 5-7, that is to say, up one handle, completely around the bow, around the head and then down the other handle. The third step comprises laying into the molds 50 bundles in the pattern shown in FIG. 8, that is to say, up one handle, across the throat and down the other handle. Concurrently short bundles are laid across the throat only. The fourth step comprises a repeat of the second step; i.e., an additional 25 fibres are laid in the pattern of FIGS. 5-7. The fifth step is a repeat of the first step; i.e., another 50 bundles are laid in the pattern of FIGS. 4-6. This process is continued until both molds l3 and 14 are filled. The molds are then closed and the material in the molds is cured, preferably by energizing the heating elements 20 and 21 and curing the racquet for 30 minutes at 200-225 F.

After curing the racquet is removed from the molds and is complete except for fitting a handle to the two handle portions formed in portions 17 and 18 of the mold, boring the holes in the head of the racquet and stringing.

The term glass" as used herein is defined as fibre glass, or alternately any of the commercially available materials generally described as carbon graphite Boron high modulus glass, or any mixture of the former with the latter.

While there has been disclosed what at present is considered a preferred embodiment of the present invention it will be appreciated that various changes and modifications may be made therein without departing from the essence of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. In a tennis racquet frame composed entirely of resin impregnated continuous unidirectional reinforcing fibers and having spaced handle portions joined to a head bow and a throat portion extending between said handle portions to complete, with said head bow, a closed head loop, the improvement comprising:

a first plurality of continuous unbroken fibers extending along one handle portion, around said head bow, along said throat portion, around said head bow again, and then along said other handle portion; and

a second plurality of unbroken continuous fibers extending along one handle portion, along said throat portion, and along the other handle portion.

2. A tennis racquet as defined in claim 1 including a third plurality of continuous unbroken fibers extending along one handle portion, around said head bow, and then along the other handle portion.

3. A tennis racquet as defined in claim 2 including a fourth plurality of unbroken glass fibers extending along only said throat portion, there being substantially the same number of glass fibers extending along each handle portion, around said head bow, and along said throat portion.

Patent Citations
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US2878020 *Dec 16, 1949Mar 17, 1959Robinson Roy HRacket for batting games
US2980158 *Apr 10, 1958Apr 18, 1961Parallel Products CompanyMethod and mold for producing an archery bow
US3483055 *Mar 28, 1966Dec 9, 1969Robert Wayne EshbaughMethod for forming a fiber glass racket frame
AU17462A * Title not available
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CA848826A *Nov 22, 1966Aug 11, 1970Stanley TrysinskyRacket frame and the production methods
FR577560A * Title not available
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3889951 *Feb 15, 1973Jun 17, 1975Gen Dynamics CorpLaminated reinforcing facing for a game racket
US3892831 *May 11, 1973Jul 1, 1975Guyot Michel RogerMethod of manufacture of tennis rackets of reinforced synthetic material
US3949988 *May 30, 1973Apr 13, 1976Fischer Gesellschaft M.B.H.Racket
US3953637 *Oct 31, 1974Apr 27, 1976United Technologies CorporationSlender rod for fishing rods and method of making the same
US3972529 *Oct 7, 1974Aug 3, 1976Mcneil Walter FReinforced tubular materials and process
US3981504 *Nov 25, 1974Sep 21, 1976Ppg Industries, Inc.Glass-carbon reinforced foamed resin tennis racket frame
US3993308 *Dec 7, 1973Nov 23, 1976Jenks Herbert RLaminated fiberglass tennis racket
US4023799 *Jan 24, 1974May 17, 1977Exxon Research And Engineering CompanyGame racket
US4061520 *Sep 3, 1976Dec 6, 1977Fansteel Inc.Method of making composite high strength to weight structure
US4070019 *Dec 8, 1975Jan 24, 1978Groves-Kelco Sales, Inc.Laminated game rackets and method of constructing same
US4070020 *Jul 7, 1976Jan 24, 1978Fansteel Inc.Composite high strength to weight structure with fray resistance
US4070021 *Jul 7, 1976Jan 24, 1978Fansteel Inc.Composite high strength to weight structure having shell and sleeved core
US4082274 *Jun 22, 1976Apr 4, 1978Robert StevensTennis racket
US4098505 *Nov 4, 1976Jul 4, 1978Thompson Dale FLaminated fiber sport racket
US4099718 *May 17, 1976Jul 11, 1978Marcraft Recreation Inc.Racquet frame construction
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US4159114 *Mar 19, 1976Jun 26, 1979La Corporation Inglasco LteeIce hockey stick
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US4324400 *Aug 8, 1979Apr 13, 1982Est Industries, Inc.Table tennis bat blade
US4333643 *Feb 19, 1980Jun 8, 1982Victor SaffireJavelin
US4404053 *Dec 15, 1980Sep 13, 1983Victor SaffireMethod of making a javelin
US4473229 *Apr 2, 1982Sep 25, 1984Kloppenburg Jerry KGolf ball utilizing graphite materials
US4489922 *May 16, 1980Dec 25, 1984Ford Motor CompanySpring leaf comprising pultruded beam
US4506887 *Aug 24, 1981Mar 26, 1985Stanley TrysinskyRacket frame comprised of a single continuous filament and resin
US4579343 *Sep 29, 1983Apr 1, 1986EktelonGraphite composite racquet
US4614626 *Apr 27, 1984Sep 30, 1986Frerking James RStringing grommets internal to frame
US4706965 *May 31, 1985Nov 17, 1987John SchaarArrow and components thereof
USRE34067 *Jul 6, 1990Sep 15, 1992EktelonRacquetball racquet with increased hitting area improved racquetball racquet construction
USRE34068 *Jul 9, 1990Sep 15, 1992EktelonRacquetball raquet with increased hitting area
EP0432398A1 *Oct 9, 1990Jun 19, 1991Sumitomo Rubber Industries, Ltd.Tennis racket frame
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/536, 273/DIG.700, 273/DIG.230
International ClassificationA63B49/10
Cooperative ClassificationA63B2209/026, Y10S273/07, Y10S273/23, A63B2209/023, A63B49/10
European ClassificationA63B49/10