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Publication numberUS3787186 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 22, 1974
Filing dateFeb 2, 1972
Priority dateFeb 2, 1972
Publication numberUS 3787186 A, US 3787186A, US-A-3787186, US3787186 A, US3787186A
InventorsR Geres
Original AssigneeUs Navy
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Calcium hydride gas generator
US 3787186 A
Abstract
A differential area gas operated hydraulic pump used in a bootstrap mode to pump water into a reaction chamber. Water is pumped into the reaction chamber until the level reaches a quantity of calcium hydride (Cah2) and reacts to produce just enough gas to exceed the operating pressure, whereupon the pump will stall. No further hydrolysis takes place until the chamber pressure is relieved at which time the pump again operates to raise the water level into contact with unreacted CaH2.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1191 Geres Jan. 22, 1974 [54] CALCIUM HYDRIDE GAS GENERATOR 3,554,707 1/1971 Holmes et a1 23 282 3,585,007 6/1971 Gross 23/282 [75] Invent Gems Chma Lake 3,561,926 2/1971 McElroy 24/282 [73] Assignee: The United States of America as g 2g 5g represented the Secretary of the app 7 y, Washington D'C. 778,052 12/1904 Lewism, 48/31 Filed: Feb. 2, 1972 FOREIGN PATENTS OI APPLICATIONS 1,214,195 12/1970 Great Britain 23/282 [21] Appl. No.: 222,833

Primary Examiner-Barry S. Richman 52 us. (:1 23/282, 48/31, 48/37, Arrow/9,1188% or Sciascia er 423/657 511 161. C1. B01j 7/02, c1011 5/00 [57] ABSTRACT [58] Fleld of Search 23/282; 423/657; 48/331, 37 A differential area gas operated hydraulic pump used in a bootstrap mode to pump water into a reaction [56] References Cited chamber. Water is pumped into the reaction chamber UNITED STATES PATENTS until the level reaches a quantity of calcium hydride 713,658 11/1902 MacKenzie 48/32 R m and reacts to Produce j enough 8 to 738,827 9/1903 May 48/37 ceed the operating ressure, whereupon the pump will 988,645 4/1911 Martin 48/37 stall. No further hydrolysis takes place until the cham- 3,174,833 3/1965 Blackmer 23/282 ber pressure is relieved at which time the pump again lg; if at operates to raise the water level into contact with unat1ca 3,453,086 7/1969 Harm 23/282 reacted Cal-I2. 3,542,524 11/1970 Kimble et a1. 23/282 5 Claims, 1 Drawing Figure RELIEF VALVE (1150 M101 REGULATOR (20 P810) 0A8 OUTLET 140 P8101 METERING VALVE CALCIUM HYDRIDE REACTION CHAMBER GAB EXHAUST CHECK VALVE 7:1 RATIO OM OPERATED IWNUUUC 1W PTENTEUJAKZZ I974 RELIEF VALVE (150 PSIG) REGULATOR (20 PSIG) GAS OUTLET (14o PSIG) METERING VALVE CALCIUM HYDRIDE REACTION CHAMBER RELIEF I VALVE (25 PSIG) HYDRAULIC PUMP J GAS EXHAUST CHECK VALV 7:1 RATIO GAS OPERATED 1 CALCIUM HYDRIDE GAS GENERATOR BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention This invention pertains to demand mode underwater reactant hydride gas generators.

2. Description of the Prior Art In the past, gas generators have been designed which provide for pressure equalization during descent of the gas generator. However, these gas generators do not produce a pressure differential over ambient which is of course necessary for performing work at a given depth. The present invention produces a pressure differential over ambient.

Also the present invention provides for refueling through the use of loaded cartridges-of CaH These cartridges are easily inserted into and removed from the reaction chamber of the present invention. Prior art devices do not provide such ease in refueling.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The invention comprises a demand mode underwater CaH; gas generator in which a differential area gas operated hydraulic pump is used in a bootstrap or selfsupporting mode to pump water into a reaction chamber. Water is pumped into the reaction chamber until the water level reaches the CaH and reacts to produce enough gas just to exceed the operating pressure, whereupon the pump will stall. No further hydrolysis takes place until the chamber pressure is relieved and the pump again operates to raise the water level into contact with unreacted CaH The cycle is thus repeated as gas is used from the generator. About 50 feet of depth pressure is required to start the generator.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING The drawing shows the invention in schematic form.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT A differential area gas operated hydraulic pump is used in a bootstrap or self-supporting mode to pump water into the reaction chamber. Water is pumped into the reactor chamber until the level reaches the CaH and reacts to produce enough gas to just exceed the operating pressure, whereupon the pump will stall. No further hydrolysis takes place until the chamber pressure is relieved and the pump again operates to raise the water level into contact with unreacted CaH The cycle is thus repeated as gas is used from the generator. Operation of the generator would be completely demand and automatic. About 50 feet of depth pressure is required to start the generator. For operation at shallower depths the unit could be prepressurized.

The granular CaH is contained in a cylindrical cartridge which consists of an outer wrap of stainless steel screen and an inner liner of fiberglass cloth. The diameter of the cartridges is limited to about 2 inches to insure that all of the CaH will be reacted. A generator could therefore have several cartridges in the reactor chamber. In general the number of cartridges is a function of the gas generation rate, and the length of the cartridges a function of the total volume of gas required.

Refueling the generator is accomplished by simply replacing the individual CaH cartridges. Loaded cartridges are stored in sealed containers and reloading performed in a relatively dry atmosphere. Also, the cartridges can be sealed so that refueling could be performed under any conditions even under water. Depleted cartridges can be disposed of in the sea.

The regulator serves to maintain a constant pressure of 20 psig downstream of the regulator when the upstream pressure is at least 20 psig. This assures that the 7:1 ratio pump will not exceed psig downstream.

I claim:

1. A gas generator system comprising:

a reaction chamber;

a quantity of water reactant hydride located in said reaction chamber;

a water conduit;

a gas operated hydraulic pump connected to said chamber via said conduit for pumping water into said chamber; and

gas conveyance means connected to said chamber and said pump for conveying gas formed in said chamber to said pump for driving said pump;

whereby said hydride, after coming into contact with water, forms a gas which drives said pump in a bootstrap fashion.

2. The system of claim 1 further comprising means for operating said generator in a demand mode.

3. The system of claim 1 further comprising means to control said pump for pumping water into said chamber until the level reaches said hydride and reacts to produce sufficient pressure to cause said pump to stall until said pressure subsides.

4. The system of claim 1 further comprising regulator means located in said conveyance means for maintaining a constant maximum gas pressure entering said pump.

5. The system of claim 1 further comprising said hydride being in the form of a cartridge.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US669140 *Sep 7, 1899Mar 5, 1901Wenzl KnappProduction of compressed gas.
US713658 *May 17, 1902Nov 18, 1902Cyrus W MackenzieAcetylene-gas generator.
US738827 *Feb 6, 1903Sep 15, 1903Walter S MayAcetylene-gas generator.
US778052 *Dec 13, 1898Dec 20, 1904Thomas E LewisAcetylene-gas generator.
US988645 *Apr 4, 1911Frederick William MartinAcetylene-gas generator.
US3174833 *May 15, 1962Mar 23, 1965Richard H BlackmerHydrogen generating canister
US3268298 *Mar 23, 1965Aug 23, 1966Aircraft Armaments IncLow-to-high pressure admission valve for gas generator
US3291572 *Apr 22, 1964Dec 13, 1966Fatica NicholasHydrogen generator
US3453086 *Oct 12, 1965Jul 1, 1969Gen ElectricSelf-regulating gas generator
US3542524 *Oct 10, 1967Nov 24, 1970Kimble Harry EOxygen generating apparatus for aquariums and other oxygen requirement systems
US3554707 *Apr 10, 1968Jan 12, 1971Gen ElectricAttitude insensitive gas generator
US3561926 *Apr 10, 1968Feb 9, 1971Gen ElectricAttitude insensitive gas generator
US3585007 *Sep 9, 1968Jun 15, 1971Morton E FrankGas generator
US3667216 *Sep 27, 1968Jun 6, 1972United Aircraft CorpPressurization system
GB1214195A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3932138 *Feb 6, 1974Jan 13, 1976Licentia Patent-Verwaltungs-G.M.B.H.Liquid decomposing system
US4054423 *Jul 21, 1975Oct 18, 1977Blenman Orman LVariable pressure fuel generator and method
US4055632 *Dec 22, 1976Oct 25, 1977The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The NavyControllable gas generator
US4374091 *Aug 14, 1981Feb 15, 1983The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The ArmyGas generators having controlled operational attitudes
US4404170 *Apr 23, 1982Sep 13, 1983The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The NavyForces reactant cylinder into reactant or non-reactant liquid
US4781894 *Mar 9, 1987Nov 1, 1988Wheaton Jeffrey CFloats, chemical reactors, pressure detectors, extendable tube
US5202195 *Dec 14, 1990Apr 13, 1993International Fuel Cells CorporationMethod of and arrangement for replenishing hydrogen consumed by a fuel cell device
US6572836Apr 10, 2000Jun 3, 2003Hydro-QuebecNanocrystalline; hydrolysis takes place much more readily, at a much higher rate and, up to completion (100% conversion)
US7052671Jan 11, 2002May 30, 2006Safe Hydrogen, LlcCan be used in a hydrogen generator to generate hydrogen for use, e.g., as a fuel
US7179443 *Aug 28, 2003Feb 20, 2007Daimlerchrysler CorporationPowder metal hydride hydrogen generator
WO1998030493A2 *Jan 6, 1998Jul 16, 1998British Nuclear Fuels PlcHydrogen gas generation
Classifications
U.S. Classification422/111, 422/129, 48/37, 423/657, 422/113, 48/31
International ClassificationC01B3/00, B01J7/02
Cooperative ClassificationB01J7/02, C01B3/00
European ClassificationC01B3/00, B01J7/02