Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3787693 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 22, 1974
Filing dateDec 14, 1972
Priority dateDec 14, 1972
Publication numberUS 3787693 A, US 3787693A, US-A-3787693, US3787693 A, US3787693A
InventorsStone R
Original AssigneeUs Army
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Boresight alignment device
US 3787693 A
Abstract
A means for zeroing a small caliber weapon on a target at night without firing the weapon. The means comprises using a boresight alignment light emitting a continuous infrared light that is mounted on a tapered mandrel with the mandrel inserted into the muzzle end of the weapon, an aiming light mounted on the weapon emitting intermittent pulses of infrared light, and a night viewing scope head worn by the weapon operator. The operator zeros the weapon on the target by superimposing the continuous and intermittent pulses of light onto each other. The operator aligns both lights by adjustment screws on the housings of the boresight alignment light and the aiming light.
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

3 37879693 United States Patent [1 1 1 Stone BORESIGHT ALIGNMENT DEVICE [75] Inventor: Robert L. Stone, Oxon Hill, Md.

[73] Assignee: The United States of America as represented by the Secretary of the Army, Washington, DC.

22 Filed: Dec. 14, 1972 211 App]. No.: 315,064

[52] US. Cl. 250/330, 356/153 [51] Int. Cl. G0lt 1/16 [58] Field of Search 250/833 H, 83.3 HP, 330;

3,067,330 12/1962 Hammar Jan. 22, 1974 Primary Examiner-James W. Lawrence Assistant Examiner-Davis L. Willis Attorney, Agent, or FirmEdward J. Kelly; Herbert Berl; Max L. Harwell [5 7] ABSTRACT A means for zeroing a small caliber weapon on a target at night without firing the weapon. The means comprises using a boresight alignment light emitting a continuous infrared light that is mounted on a tapered mandrel with the mandrel inserted into the muzzle end of the weapon, an aiming light mounted on the weapon emitting intermittent pulses of infrared light, and a night viewing scope head worn by the weapon operator. The operator zeros the weapon on the target by superimposing the continuous and intermittent pulses of light onto each other. The operator aligns both lights by adjustment screws on the housings of the boresight alignment light and the aiming light.

5 Claims, 3 Drawing Figures Pmmmmz a 787 693 SHEU 1 0F 3 I 4 v 1 BORESIGI-IT ALIGNMENT DEVICE BACKGROUND AND SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Only in the last few years has work been done in the field of night viewing by intensification of ambient light, such as starlight or moonlight, when used with military weapons. The present invention is a method of zeroing an aiming light that is attached to a small caliber weapon with a boresight alignment light that is inserted in the muzzel end of the weapon in which the weapon does not have to be fired, and thus disclose its position.

This invention comprises a method of zeroing the weapon by utilizing a boresight alignment light device that is attached to a tapered mandrel with the mandrel inserted into the muzzle end of the weapon and the boresight alignment light device emitting a continuous collimated beam of infrared light toward the target. An aiming light is attached to the weapon has a pulsing infrared light aimed at the target. The continuous and pulsed infrared lights are adjusted so that their returned illumination is superimposed over each other. This beam from the boresight alignment light is adjusted by means of external boresight adjustment screws connected to an internal mechanism so that when the mandrel is rotated through 360 within the muzzle of the weapon the beam is coaxially concentric with the weapon bore. The aiming light has the same infrared light emission system as the boresight alignment device that the light is intermittent so'that its beam may be distinguished from the continuous beam from the boresight alignment light. The aiming light also has external adjustment screws connected to an internal mechanism for aligning the intermittent infrared beam onto the target. Both the aiming light beam and the boresight alignment light beam are projected in a spectral range invisible to the naked eye but clearly visible with a head worn night viewing scopes.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION THE DRAWINGS FIG. I shows the boresight light housing with attached mandrel and battery power supply;

FIG. 2 illustrates a sectional view of the boresight alignment light; and

FIG. 3 illustrates the aiming light as mounted'on the weapon. 1

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT FIG. I illustrates the boresight alignment light device 16 having typical tapered mandrel 12 attached thereto. A plurality of mandrels are provided with device 16 that have different bore diameters for fitting into the muzzle end 18 of different caliber weapons. A battery power supply 14 is shown disattached from light 16 but ready for connection thereto by weather proof connector l threadably connecting the two sections 9a and 9b together. Power supply 14 willbe explained in more detail later in this description.

FIG. 2 is a sectional view of device 16 illustrating the various elements therein and the external connections thereto. Numerals 20 and 22 represent the main housing. Numeral 20 represents the front window and primary mirror retainer and numeral 22 represents the secondary mirror retainer with both retainers being threadably connected together by threads 22a for enclosing weather proof seal 21a to form main housing 16. The transparent front window 27, onto which primary mirror 38 is attached, is held by window retainer ring 28 threadably connected to housing 20. The optical system comprises a catadioptic system mounted inside device 16 which is mounted with its optical axis along the longitudinal axis of 16. That is, primary mirror 38 and a secondary mirror 46 are mounted along the longitudinal axis of device 16 and form an integral part of retainer 20. Mirror 46 is fixedly attached to retainer 20 along the outer circumferential edge 20a. Secondary mirror 46 has an opening in its center for allowing illumination from battery powered diode 42, suchas a gallium arsenide phosphide diode, to pass therethrough and be reflected off primary mirror 38, be re-reflected off the curved portion of secondary mirror 46, and out transparent window 27 in a collimated beam. The collimated beam has only one-fourth degree beam spread. This illumination is shown by dashed lines 42a and 42b with direction arrows attached thereto.

Diode 42 is positioned with its beam along the longitudinal axis of device 16 and isheld by diode mounting plate 24 within diode container 40. Plate 24 is held loosely against housing 22 by three lock screws 44 (with only one shown). Lockscrews 44 are threadably connected to diode mounting plate retainer 32. A diode lock nut 26a is threadably connected on the rear side of diode 42 to hold diode 42 stationary within container 40. Lock nut 26a is tightened down on diode 42 when the diode has been properly focussed by the catadioptic optical system and need not be'removed until the diode is replaced. A seal screw 36 is threadably connected to housing 22 with a proper seal to allow removal when replacement of the diode or refocus thereof is necessary. Oneiof a plurality of tapered mandrels form an integral part of a mandrel adapter 30. Adapter 30 is threadably connected to main housing 22, and when fully threaded is firmly secured thereto. Tapered mandrel 12 is made of hardened steel that is chrome plated. Enlarged portion 12a of mandrel 12 is secured within mandrel adapter 20. Smaller portion 12b is tapered slightly, at about 0.002 inch per foot, to fit into the muzzle end of a weapon whose boresight is being aligned."

The diode 42 is energized power supply 14 thereto through cables 9a and 9b conductively connected together by weather proof connector 10. In FIG. 2', only a portion of cable 9a is shown since FIG. 1 illustratesthe-overall view of these connections. Cable 9 is attachedto retainer 22 at cable connector 13. Conductive leads from cable 9a pass through retainer 22 and are connected to diode 42 at positive terminal 8b and negative terminal 8a. Two large headed knurled boresight adjustment screws 50 (with only one shown) are orthogonally fitted against diode mounting plate 24. On opposite sides of plate 24 from screws 50 are spring loadedplungers 51 (with only one shown). With diode 42 held securely in 40 by lock nut 26a and container 40 attached to plate 24, screws 50 will move plate 24 along two orthogonal axes for projecting the illumination pattern of diode 42 along the longitudinal axis of the boresight alignment device 16. i

FIG. 3 illustrates the aiming light 16a mounted on weapon as used in conjunction with device vl6 mounted on muzzle 18. Device 16 is notshown in FIG.

by connecting battery I 3 since it was explained with reference to FIG. 1. Aiming light 160 is mounted on bracket 62 by bolt 68 pulling the housing of aiming light 16a down in the groove of bracket 62. A dead man switch 60 strapped on the handle of weapon 70 is used to switch an internal battery to a thermal relay. Switch 60 is electrically connected by lead 60a between the battery and thermal relay within the housing of 16a. Switch 60 is positioned on the handle so that it may easily be depressed by the operators trigger finger prior to the operator squeezing the trigger. The internal mechanism of 16a is the same as that of 16 except that battery is internal and the thermal relay has been added in the line between the battery and the gallium arsenide phosphide diode. The thermal relay provides intermittent interruptions between the battery and the diode. Two adjustment screws 50a, positioned orthogonal to each other (with only one shown), align the illumination pattern of the diode along the longitudinal axis of the aiming light 16a in the same manner that adjustment screws 50 in the boresight alignment light device. The weapon is generally zeroed on a target about 100 yards or less from the weapon. Thus, essentially no parallax exists between the two lights. As stated above, the night viewing scope is worn by the operator for receiving the infrared reflections from a target.

In operation of zeroing weapon 70 at night, the boresight alignment light 16 with the tapered mandrel 12 attached thereto is attached to the weapon with the mandrel inserted in the muzzle end 18 of weapon 70. The aiming light is mounted on weapon 70. The weapon operator puts the night viewing scope on his head to view the infrared light from device 16 and light 16a that is reflected from a target.

Diode 42 produces a continuous beamof infrared illumination that is transmitted out of device 16 by way of mirrors 38 and 46 which are suitably curved and spaced to allow a collimated beam of not more than l/4 degree spread. A night viewing scope, or image intensifier, which may be head worn or tripod mounted, receives the reflected illumination from the target, giving the user a visible image of both the scene and the apparent illuminated spot reflected from the point indicating the strike of the bullet. To properly zero the weapon with the target, the borsi ght alignment light 16 is rotated through 360 while both screws 50 are adjusted to position the radiation from diode 42 along the longitudinal axis of device 16 until radiation from diode 42 is positioned along the longitudinal axis of device 16. The reflected spot of illumination from the target will be observed through the night viewing scope to make a sweeping arc while device 16 is rotated through the 360. When the radiation pattern is along the longitudinal axis of device 16, the reflected spot of illumination will be stationary.

The catadioptic optical system comprising primary mirror 38 and secondary mirror 46 has a diameter of 50 millimeters with a one quarterof a degree beam spread, thus forming a relatively small spot of illumination at the target 100 yards away. The size of the spot is also determined by the resolution of the night viewing scope. The gallium arsenide phosphide diode produces illumination in the infrared spectrum, which is invisible to the naked eye. Therefore, the night viewing scope is the type that converts infrared to visible illumination. v

Another illumination source suitable for replacing diode 42 is a Xenon arc lamp with the catadioptic optical system replaced by a simple double convex projection lens. The method of alignment would be the same as described above but with the advantage of the device being smaller and having a narrower beam of illumination. The power source for either device is separated from the boresight alignment device 16, for safety reasons. lf power supply source 14 is allowed to hang or swing while the alignment procedures are in process, the operator is more likely to be reminded to remove device 16 from the muzzle end of the weapon before firing. I

l Claim: 1. A means of zeroing a small caliber weapon at night without firing the weapon, the stepscomprising:

mounting an aiming light on said weapon, said aiming light has an intermittent pulse producing infrared source that produces intermittent beam of infrared illumination and optics that projects said intermittent beam of infrared illumination toward a target; inserting a tapered mandrel having a boresight alignment light mounted thereto into the muzzle end of said weapon, said boresight alignment light has a continuous infrared emitting source that produces a continuous beam of infrared illumination and optics that projects said continuous beam of infrared illuminations toward the same target; providing night viewing image intensifier goggles that are head worn by an operator wherein said goggles convert the intermittent and continuous beams of infrared illumination that is reflected from a target to visible illumination for observationby said operators; rotating said tapered mandrel through 360 within the muzzle end of said weapon and simultaneously adjusting the continuous beam of infrared illumination into a spot of reflected light signifying said continuous beam of light along the boresight of said weapon; and adjusting the direction of said intermittent beamof infrared light until said intermittent beam and said continuous beam are superimposed over each other. 7 i 2. A means of zeroing a smaller caliber weapon as set forth in claim 1 wherein said intermittent pulse producing infrared source and said continuous infrared emitting source are gallium arsenide phosphide diodes.

3. A means of zeroing a small caliber weapon as set forth in claim 2 wherein said optics is a catadioptic optical system.

4. A means of zeroing a small caliber weapon as set forth in claim 3 wherein said catadioptic system has a diameter of 50 millimeters and one quarter degree beam spread.

5. A means of zeroing a small caliber weapon as set forth in claim 2 wherein said optics is a double convex projection lens. 1

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3067330 *Dec 13, 1957Dec 4, 1962Hammar Louise BGun sight
US3612949 *Sep 26, 1969Oct 12, 1971Us Air ForceLaser boresight device
US3711204 *Oct 6, 1971Jan 16, 1973Weaver Co WOptical sight aligner
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3971933 *Jun 18, 1975Jul 27, 1976The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The ArmyQuick disconnect for night vision optics
US4168429 *Dec 16, 1977Sep 18, 1979The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The ArmyInfrared borescope device and method of boresight alignment of a weapon
US4530162 *Aug 8, 1983Jul 23, 1985Robert S. ForrestApparatus and method for boresighting a firearm
US4581977 *May 2, 1983Apr 15, 1986General Dynamics, Pomona DivisionBoresight apparatus and method for missiles
US4707595 *Dec 29, 1986Nov 17, 1987Meyers Brad EInvisible light beam projector and night vision system
US4825258 *Jan 4, 1988Apr 25, 1989Whitson John MDevice for bore alignment of gun sights
US4991183 *Mar 2, 1990Feb 5, 1991Meyers Brad ETarget illuminators and systems employing same
US5036517 *Oct 1, 1990Jul 30, 1991Meyers Brad ETarget illuminators and systems employing same
US5042048 *Oct 1, 1990Aug 20, 1991Meyer Brad ETarget illuminators and systems employing same
US5056097 *Oct 1, 1990Oct 8, 1991Meyers Brad ETarget illuminators and systems employing same
US5432598 *Mar 29, 1994Jul 11, 1995Szatkowski; DavidApparatus for laser assisted firearm sights alignment
US5446535 *May 9, 1994Aug 29, 1995Williams; John H.Firearm non-firing sight alignment system
US6255946 *Feb 28, 2000Jul 3, 2001Jae Han KimSystem for detecting an object passing through a gate
US6574901Nov 3, 2000Jun 10, 2003Insight Technology IncorporatedAuxiliary device for a weapon and attachment thereof
US7117624Apr 6, 2004Oct 10, 2006Surefire, LlcAccessory devices for firearms
US7310903May 30, 2006Dec 25, 2007Surefire, LlcAccessory devices for firearms
US7325352Jun 24, 2004Feb 5, 2008Surefire, LlcAccessory devices for firearms
US7360333May 17, 2006Apr 22, 2008Surefire, LlcAccessory devices for firearms
US7367254Aug 25, 2006May 6, 2008Hitachi Koki Co., Ltd.Cutter with laser generator that irradiates cutting position on workpiece to facilitate alignment of blade with cutting position
US7373866 *Jul 30, 2004May 20, 2008Hitachi Koki Co., Ltd.Cutter with laser generator that irradiates cutting position on workpiece to facilitate alignment of blade with cutting position
US7383759 *Jul 30, 2004Jun 10, 2008Hitachi Koki Co., Ltd.Cutter with laser generator that irradiates cutting position on workpiece to facilitate alignment of blade with cutting position
US7418894 *Jul 30, 2004Sep 2, 2008Hitachi Koki Co., Ltd.Cutter with laser generator that irradiates cutting position on workpiece to facilitate alignment of blade with cutting position
US7591098Dec 12, 2005Sep 22, 2009Surefire, LlcAccessory devices for firearms
US7793575Apr 11, 2006Sep 14, 2010Hitachi Koki Co., Ltd.Cutter with laser generator that irradiates cutting position on workpiece to facilitate alignment of blade with cutting position
US7886644Feb 21, 2006Feb 15, 2011Hitachi Koki Co., Ltd.Cutter with laser generator that irradiates cutting position on workpiece to facilitate alignment of blade with cutting position
US7930962Mar 3, 2008Apr 26, 2011Hitachi Koki Co., Ltd.Cutter with laser generator that irradiates cutting position on workpiece to facilitate alignment of blade with cutting position
US8359960Mar 29, 2011Jan 29, 2013Hitachi Koki Co., Ltd.Cutter with laser generator that irradiates cutting position on workpiece to facilitate alignment of blade with cutting position
US8394016Jul 2, 2009Mar 12, 2013Bruce Cabot ArnéIlluminated airway article
US8770076Jan 7, 2013Jul 8, 2014Hitachi Koki Co., Ltd.Cutter with laser generator that irradiates cutting position on workpiece to facilitate alignment of blade with cutting position
US8826583 *Jun 27, 2012Sep 9, 2014Trackingpoint, Inc.System for automatically aligning a rifle scope to a rifle
US8860800Mar 31, 2011Oct 14, 2014Flir Systems, Inc.Boresight alignment station
USRE33572 *Jul 13, 1989Apr 16, 1991 Invisible light beam projector and night vision system
WO2002027259A2 *Sep 26, 2001Apr 4, 2002Blau MosheMethod and apparatus for the precise alignment of a weapon relative to a sight
Classifications
U.S. Classification250/330, 356/153
International ClassificationF41G1/00, G02B23/12, F41G1/54, G02B23/00, G02B23/14
Cooperative ClassificationG02B23/12, F41G1/545, G02B23/14
European ClassificationG02B23/14, F41G1/54B, G02B23/12