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Publication numberUS3788054 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 29, 1974
Filing dateAug 2, 1972
Priority dateAug 4, 1971
Also published asDE2138926A1, DE2138926B2, DE2138926C3
Publication numberUS 3788054 A, US 3788054A, US-A-3788054, US3788054 A, US3788054A
InventorsHaussmann G, Schulz G
Original AssigneeZinser Textilmaschinen Gmbh
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for transporting and storing yarn pirns or the like
US 3788054 A
Abstract
An apparatus for transporting and storing a plurality of yarn packages and/or pirns in a separated, non-contacting arrangement and including a portable storage unit which comprises a number of horizontally directed supports, each support being adapted to hold the lower end of a plurality of yarn packages. The supports are movable along an endless path of travel such that the supports may be individually brought to a transfer station. The apparatus further includes a conveyor extending along one side of a yarn processing machine and which is adapted to convey the doffed yarn packages in a separated arrangement to a loading station. A transfer apparatus is also provided which is cyclically operable to transfer a plurality of separated yarn packages between the transfer station on the storage unit and the loading station, the transfer apparatus serving to advance the storage unit during each cycle of operation to thereby bring a different support to the transfer station after each cycle of operation.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Haussmann et al.

APPARATUS FOR TRANSPORTING AND STORING YARN PIRNS OR THE LIKE Inventors: Gerhard Haussmann; Gunter Schulz, both of Ebersbach-Sulpach,

Germany Zinser-Tertilmaschinen Gesellschaft mit beschrankter Haftung, Ebersbach, Germany Filed: Aug. 2, 1972 Appl. No.: 277,480

Assignee:

Foreign Application Priority Data Aug. 4, 1971 Germany P 21 38 926.4

US. Cl. 57/34 R, 57/52, 198/31 AA, 198/102, 198/20, 198/233, 214/164 R Int. Cl D01h 13/26 Field of Search. 214/164 R, 16.1 BB; 57/34 R; 198/31 AA, 102, 20, 233

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS Brouwer 242/355 Brummett et al. 214/11 R [111 3,788,054 1 Jan. 29, 1974 Primary Examiner-Gerald M; Forlenza Assistant Examiner-R. Johnson Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Samuel G. Layton, Jr. et al.

[ ABSTRACT An apparatus for transporting and storing a plurality of yarn packages and/or pims in a separated, noncontacting arrangement and including a portable storage unit which comprises a number of horizontally directed supports, each support being adapted to hold the lower end of a plurality of yarn packages. The supports are movable along an endless path of travel such that the supports may be individually brought to a transfer station. The apparatus further includes a conveyor extending along one side of a yarn processing machine and which is adapted to convey the doffed yarn packages in a separated arrangement to a loading station. A transfer apparatus is also provided which is cyclically operable to transfer a plurality of separated yarn packages between the transfer station on the storage unit and the loading station, the transfer apparatus serving to advance the storage unit during each cycle of operation to thereby bring a different support to the transfer station after each cycle of operation.

20 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures :ATENTED JAN 2 9 I974 SHEEI 1 OF 5 PATENTEDJAH 29 IBM 3 788' 054 SHEET 3 BF 5 88 8 i I I I N \l M \f. vr

PATENTEUJAN 29 1974 saw u or 5 1 APPARATUS FOR TRANSPORTING AND STORING YARN PIRNS OR THE LIKE The present invention relates to an apparatus for conveying and storing a plurality of yarn packages comprising yarn wound on spools, bobbins, cops, pirns and the like (hereinafter called pirns), and wherein the packages are maintained in a separated non-contacting arrangement. The apparatus is typically used in association with a textile machine, such as a spinning frame or twister, and includes provision for moving the yarn packages by a conveyor to a transfer device which in turn transfers them into a storage device.

The term yarn" as used in the present application is meant to include any elongated textile material fabricated from fibers and/or one or more filaments or the like, and which can be wound on pirns as defined above, and including for example sliver, roving, yarn, thread, etc.

In conventional yarn processing operations, the yarn packages are usually removed manually from the winding stations of the machine on which the yarn packages have been wound, but mechanical doffing apparatus are becoming increasingly more prevalent. The yarn packages can be replaced with empty yarn pirns manually, or preferably by means of an automatic changing device in known manner, and in which a conveyor device initially conveys the empty yarn pirns into the vicinity of the winding stations where they are then substituted by the changing device for the yarn packages either simultaneously or, in certain cases, in succession. After the number of yarn packages corresponding to the number of winding stations on the side of the machine in question have been arranged on the conveyor device, the conveyor device, which generally is a conveyor belt or a conveyor chain, is placed in motion and the yarn packages are moved along the corresponding side of the machine to a point of removal. in this connection, it is conventional practice to successively feed the yarn packages arriving at the point of removal into a storage box or shipping carton, the packages being fed into such carton by a fork-like lifting device which individually transfers them through an opening located at the bottom thereof.

In the above process, the yarn packages may be damaged either by the lifting device or in the storage carton. More particularly, the yarn packages are positioned to lie on the fork of the lifting device, and are used to open a trap door of the storage carton. Also, the yarn packages lie in the storage carton in a horizontal position alongside each other, and thus upon the feeding of every new yarn package, the yarn packages already present in the storage carton are shaken and will rub against each other, as well as against the walls of the carton. For yarn packages of sensitive yarn, the above conventional handling and storage procedures could not be used in practice without damaging the outer layers of yarn. Thus, it has been necessary to remove and discard some of the outer layers from such yarn packages.

Yarn packages produced on draw-twisting machines, false-twisting machines or the like and which process continuous synthetic filaments, are particularly sensitive, and the above described handling and storage operations could not be satisfactorily employed on such machines. Thus, the present invention is particularly useful in association with machines on which synthetic continuous yarns are processed. However, the

invention is not limited to this use, and it can also be advantageously employed in other textile machines in which yarns are wound on pirns, such as ring spinning frames or twisters.

One object of the present invention is to provide an apparatus of the described type which is capable of paratus and yarn packages could be transported to an- 7 other machine for further processing, or to a point for shipment.

In accordance with the described embodiment of the present invention, the above objects and advantages are achieved by an apparatus which includes a storage unit having a plurality of movable elongated supports for holding a plurality of yarn packages spaced from each other along the length thereof, and a transfer device which operates cyclically such that upon each cycle of operation the transfer device feeds at least one yarn package which has been brought to a loading station by a conveyor device to a support on the storage unit which has been moved into a receiving or transfer position. The loaded support is then moved by the action of the transfer device further into a storage position to bring another support to the transfer position. Control means may also be provided for automatically controlling the apparatus.

In accordance with the present invention, the yarn packages do not come in contact with each other, either during their various movements or in their storage position. Thus, they are not subject to the danger of damage. Also, the apparatus of the present invention is designed such that the yarn packages do not come into contact with any parts of the apparatus since the apparatus includes means for the holding of the pirns on which the yarn is wound only at one end, or possibly temporarily on both ends in a manner that the yarn is not contacted. Suitable holders of this type are known. Thus, the conveyor can for this purpose comprise a conveyor belt or a conveyor chain on which there are arranged upwardly directed mandrels on which the tubular pirns of the yarn packages are placed and which hold them in a vertical position. The pirn holders of the transfer device and/or storage unit may also comprise upwardly directed mandrels, or the holders of the transfer device and/or storage unit may comprise grippers which hold the pirns at their upper end while maintaining them in a vertical position.

The storage unit is preferably in the form of a transportable stand so that after it is filled it can be replaced with an empty storage unit, and then transported to a desired place by hand or by automatic pulling means.

The capacity of the storage unit is preferably such that it can receive at least all of the yarn packages produced by the winding stations on one side of the machine and which are arranged simultaneously on the conveyor. However, in many cases it may be advantageous to provide it with a smaller or larger storage capacity. In case of smaller storage capacity, the storage unit must then be replaced one or more times by an empty storage unit during the emptying of the conveyor.

One advantage of the apparatus of the present invention resides in the fact that the storage unit need not have any drive of its own, its supports being moved by the action of the transfer device. Depending on the nature of the subsequent treatment of the yarn packages, they may remain in the storage unit during this subsequent treatment, such as for example during conditioning. Furthermore, if desired, the storage unit has such a simple and economical construction that it can be shipped in filled condition to another plant.

Generally, between every two fillings of the conveyor with full yarn packages, there is a relatively long period of time available for the transfer of the yarn packages into the storage unit. Thus, as a rule, a relatively slow speed of operation can be provided, transferring, for instance, only a single yarn package into the storage unit during each cycle of the transfer device. However, it is generally desirable to empty the conveyor relatively rapidly so that the least possible amount of dust or fly-will be deposited on the yarn packages. Thus, in accordance with the present invention, it is preferred that the transfer device simultaneously carry at least about four to eight yarn packages during each cycle. in this regard, the transfer apparatus is provided with a corresponding number of grippers which are transported in unison between the conveyor and storage unit such that the retained yarn packages may be placed on a corresponding number of holders on one of the supports of the storage unit.

Also in accordance with the present invention, itis contemplated that each yarn package be transported in a vertical position into the vicinity of the transfer apparatus by the conveyor such that the pirns of the yarn packages may be gripped at their upper ends by a suitable holder or gripper of the transfer apparatus. The yarn packages may then be moved upwardly, and thereafter brought in a downward direction such that their lower ends are brought into a holding connection with the holders of one of the supports of the storage unit which is in its receiving or transfer position. The support is then moved downward further a certain amount by the further downward movement of the transfer apparatus, whereupon the grippers of the transfer apparatus are released and returned empty to their starting position. In this connection, the lower end of the pirn of the yarn package viewed during its downward movement, is preferably applied to the holder of the storage unit and held in vertical position by the latter. In this case, the yarn packages are not turned by the transfer device during their conveyance. In many cases, however, it may be advisable to have the yarn packages, together with the grippers of the transfer apparatus holding them, reverse their position upon passing over the upper curve of their path of movement, i.e. to have their end which is held by the gripper facing downward during the downward movement. The holders of the storage unit may then be developed in such a manner that they grip the ends of the pirns which are directed upwardly during the downward movement, for example by means of tongs or the like.

It will be apparent that several various means for gripping the yarn packages arriving at the transfer apparatus on the conveyor are possible. Thus the grippers of the transfer device could, for example, be developed as tongs which grip the lower end of the pirns of the yarn packages placed vertically on mandrels of the conveyor. In this case, the yarn packages would then preferably be first guided upwardly by the transfer appara- -tus and then swung into a downward direction of A particularly simple design of the storage unit may be obtained if the movement of the supports of the storage unit is effected by the transfer apparatus. In such case, the storage unit then requires no drive of its own, and thus would not require any electrical or other power connections.

The control means for the conveyor, the transfer apparatus, and possibly the storage unit may be of any suitable nature and their specific development lies within the knowledge of one skilled in the art. These control means may, for example, have switch means for moving the conveyor step by step such that the. intended number of yarn packages are brought to a loading station adjacent the transfer apparatus uponeach step. As soon as this has been done, the transfer apparatus automatically grips the corresponding yarn packages at the loading station and transfers them onto one of the supports of the storage unit. The transfer of the yarn packages to the supports of the storage unit is controlled in a suitable manner such that the yarn packages fed to the storage unit during each cycle are automatically advanced into the storage unit by one step or to a suitable place at which they remain stationary. This forward advance is preferably effected by the action of the transfer apparatus. However, the storage unit could have its own drive for effecting the movement of the supports, in which case the supports would be moved in a corresponding fashion. Further, the conveyor may be moved forward again by one step during each cycle of the transfer apparatus so that at the end of each cycle a new similar cycle of movement of the transfer apparatus can immediately take place. This cyclical operation is continued until all yarn packages present on the conveyor have been transferred into the storage unit.

Two or more conveyors may be arranged on a textile machine, with for example one conveyor on each side of the machine. Each such conveyor could have its own transfer apparatus, or in certain cases they could be provided with a common transfer apparatus. in the latter case, the transfer apparatus could be portable so that it could be brought to the conveyor which is to be unloaded. The storage unit could in such case be advantageously designed so that it has a capacity which corresponds to the sum of the capacities of the two conveyors, in which case it may be desirable for the storage unit to be capable of being filled with yarn packages from two sides.

The conveyor according to the present invention may also servefor conveying empty yarn pirns into the vicinity of the winding stations. In such case, the apparatus of the present invention can be designed in such a manner that its storage unit may be loaded with empty pirns and which may be brought cyclically onto the conveyor bythe transfer apparatus. For this purpose,

the storage unit could have separate holders for the empty pirns and yarn packages, or the holders for the yarn packages could also be used for the holding of the empty pirns.

Some of the objects and advantages of the invention having been stated, others will appear as the description proceeds, when taken in connection with theaccompanying drawings, in which FIG. 1 is an isometric view of a portion of a yarn processing machine and illustrating a portion of the conveyor and the transfer apparatus according to the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a plan view of the apparatus shown in FIG. 1, and further illustrating the storage unit of the present invention;

FIG. 3 is an isometric view of the storage unit of the present invention;

FIG.-4 is aside elevation view of the apparatus shown in FIG. 2, but on a larger scale;

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary enlarged isometric view of the upper portion of the transfer apparatus of the present invention, and further illustrating a guide device for the yarn pirn holding bar;

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary isometric view, partly sectioned, of a portion of the transfer apparatus and storage unit as shown in FIGS. 1-3, and further illustrating means for aligning the yarn pirns during placement on the storage unit;

Referring more specifically to the drawings, the apparatus for transporting and storing yarn packages is generally illustrated in FIGS. 1-3, and comprises the partially shown conveyor 11 extending along one side of the yarn processing machine 10, a transfer apparatus 12, and a portable storage unit 13. The machine may be provided with several such storage units 13, which may be brought individually into operative position adjacent the transfer apparatus.

The conveyor 11 includes an endless conveyor belt 14 which is driven by means of a variable speed motor 15, the conveyor belt extending from the vicinity of the left (non-illustrated) end of the corresponding side of the yarn processing machine as shown in FIG. 1, and having arranged on it a number of mandrels 16 corresponding at least to the number of winding stations on the corresponding side of the machine. Thus either empty yarn pirns (not shown) or full yarn packages 17 can be placed vertically on the mandrels so that they have the position shown in FIG. 1.

The conveyor 11 is in principle of known construction, and is therefore not explained in full detail. The yarn packages 17 are preferably placed on the mandrels 16 by means of an automatic doffing device (not shown) after removal from the corresponding winding stations of the machine 10, and the'conveyor belt extends beyond the end 19 of the machine 10 to define a loadingstation.

The transfer device 12 is mounted adjacent the loading station and includes two vertical standards 20, each of the standards 20 mounting a pair of. sprockets 2 1 and 22 in spaced vertical alignment. The two pairs of an endless chain 24 entrained about the sprockets such that each chain has two straight parallel chain paths, the two chains being of the same length and aligned with each other. One of the sprockets 21 is driven by a reversible motor 25 which is controlled by a suitable switch (not shown), the drive shaft of the motor thus being able to be selectively driven in opposite directions of rotation. The two lower sprockets 22 are connected for rotation with each other by a shaft 26. A horizontally directed bar 28 in the form of a hollow beam is pivotally connected to two arms 30, which are in turn rigidly connected to the two chains 24. Six holders in the form of grippers 32 are arranged on the bottom of the bar 28 in order to grip and hold a corresponding number of pirns of yarn packages. Each gripper 32 may comprise a bag-like, inflatable bellow (not specifically illustrated), such bellow being able to assume a non-inflated configuration to permit the same to be inserted into the hollow upper end of the tubular pirns of yarn packages positioned on the conveyor belt 15. Subsequently, the grippers 32 may be inflated by compressed air to effect a firm holding connection with the pirns. Such grippers 32 and the control means associated with them for controlling the compressed air are sprockets are mounted for rotation about parallel hori- I zontal axes, andeach vertical pair of sprockets mounts of conventional design, and are therefore not shown in detail. In this regard, the hollow bar 28 may serve for the passage of the compressed air to the grippers, and may be connected by a hose (not shown) to the source of compressed air.

The storage unit 13 comprises a generally rectangular framework 34 including two horizontally spaced, vertically directed members 35 and 36, and upper and lower horizontal connecting members 38 and 39 respectively. The framework further includes four supporting wheels 40 mounted adjacent the lower end thereof such that the storage unit is portable and may be manually wheeled between various locations. At least one of the four wheels 40 is provided with a conventional brake (in a manner not shown in the drawing) in order to hold the unit in the receiving position shown in FIGS. 2 and 4. The storage unit 13 carries a total of five sprockets 42 on the inwardly facing side surfaces of each of the vertically directed members 35 and 36, the sprockets 42 being mounted for rotation about horizontal axes and being aligned in pairs such that the axis of each of the sprockets on one of the vertically directed members is coaxial with one of the sprockets on the other members. An endless chain 44 is entrained about the sprockets of each vertically directed member, the two chains being connected for movement with each other by an interconnection 46 for effecting concurrent rotation of all the sprockets. An adjustable brake 48 of conventional design is provided for resisting rotation of the sprockets to thereby prevent undesired movement. The storage unit 13 further comprises a plurality of horizontally directed supports 50 extending between the two chains. The supports are pivotally interconnected to the chains by a structure which includes'a pair of vertical arms 52 which are pivoted for rotation on bearing pins fastened to the chains 44 adjacent the upper end of the arms so that each support 50 can swing and at all times automatically bring itself into a vertical position as shown in the drawing. On the top of each support 50 there are arranged a total of six mandrels 54 which are similar to the mandrels 16 of the conveyor belt 15 of the conveyor 11. Thus the yarn packages 17 can be placed on the mandrels 54 and be held by them in a vertical position. The length of the arms 52 is such that the center of gravity of the support 50, even with the yarn packages placed thereon, always lies below its axis of rotation so that the supports 50 always swing into the vertical position shown in the drawing.

As can best be seen in FIG. 4, the chains 44 of the storage unit have an upper horizontal path which is adjoined on both sides by vertical downward paths. Between the two outer vertical paths there is also arranged a loop with two vertical paths. In this way there is obtained optimum utilization of the space available in the storage unit 13 for the storing of the largest possible number of yarn packages.

The manner of operation of the above described apparatus which is automatically controlled by a suitable control panel 56 is as follows:

When all of the yarn pirns have been filled to form yarn packages at the winding stations of the yarn processing machine and the packages have been deposited on the associated mandrels 16 of the conveyor belt 14 of the conveyor device 11, the transfer operation is commenced, either automatically as part of an automatic doffing operation, or manually. At this time, it is assumed that the storage unit 13 is empty, and that the storage unit has been moved manually or mechanically into receiving position with respect to the transfer apparatus 12 as shown in FIGS. 2 and 4. The conveyor belt 14 is then moved in the direction of the arrow 58 until the first six yarn packages 17, as seen in the direction of motion, are positioned immediately below the grippers 32 of the transfer device 12. The belt is stopped, and the bar 28 carrying the grippers 32 is lowered, by energizing the motor 25, into the position shown in FIGS. 1 and 4 and in which the grippers 32 are inserted into the open hollow ends of the yarn pirns. The grippers are then inflated by compressed air to such an extent that they hold the yarn packages in a depending arrangement. Thereupon, the motor is automatically placed in a reverse direction of rotation so that the bar 28 together with the retained yarn packages 17 are moved vertically upwardly and then over the upper curve of the chain sprockets 21, and then vertically downwardly. Since the bar 28 is rotatably supported on the arms 30, and the center of gravity of the packages is located below the axis of the bar 28, the packages will remain in a depending vertical position upon passage over the upper curved path of their motion. The storage unit 13 is in such a position that the mandrels 54 of the support 50 positioned at the predetermined transfer station 60 (shown in solid lines in FIG. 4) are exactly centered vertically below the lower openings of the pirns of the yarn packages 17 as they are moved vertically downwardly by the transfer apparatus, so that the pirns pass onto the mandrels 54 upon their downward motion.

The bar 28 of the transfer apparatus 12 is then moved further downward until the arms carrying the bar come into the position indicated in dashed lines at 30' (FIG. 4), and the yarn packages borne by the bar 28 come into the position designated 17'. It will be observed that the support which has thereby been brought to the transfer station 60 rests against the bar 28 and is in a pivoted position as shown in dashed lines.

The movement of the supports 50 of the storage unit 13 is thereby effected by the downward movement of the bar 28 and grippers 32 of the transfer apparatus since this downward movement conducts the newly delivered yarn packages 17 downward. All of the supports 50 of the storage unit 13 are thus moved a corresponding distance along their endless path of travel as defined by the chains 44 which carry the supports 50. Upon each such downward movement, an empty support 50 is thus also shifted from the station 62 (F IG. 4) to the transfer station by the action of the transfer apparatus.

During or at the end of the displacement of the supports 50 of the storage unit 13 by the transfer device 12, the compressed air is automatically released from out of the grippers 32 of the transfer apparatus so that the grippers no longer hold the yarn pirns. The downward movement of the bar 28 of the transfer apparatus, which movement displaces the supports 50 of the storage unit 13, can, for example, be terminated by an automatic reversing switch (not shown) which is automatically actuated by a pin fastened to one of the chains 24 when the bar 28 has reached its predetermined lowermost position. The direction of rotation of the motor 25 is thus reversed, and the bar 28 together with its grippers 32 are moved upwardly and out of contact with the previously deposited yarn packages 17 and the empty support 50 of the storage unit which is located at the transfer station 60. The bar 28 is then conducted over the upper curve of its path and downward to engage additional yarn packages 17 which in the meantime have been brought into a loading position adjacent the transfer apparatus by a corresponding displacement of the conveyor belt 14.

The above process is repeated cyclically until all yarn packages present on the conveyor belt 14 have been transferred into the storage unit 13 and are stored therein.

As can readily be seen, the above apparatus can also be used without structural change for transferring empty yarn pirns stored in the storage unit to the conveyor. In such case, the empty yarn pirns are placed on the mandrels 54 of the storage unit. The six empty yarn pirns (not shown) which are arranged in this manner on the support 50 which is at the transfer station 60 (FIG. 4) are grasped by the grippers 32 of the transfer device 12. More particularly, rotation of the chains 24 in the forward direction causes the grippers to enter the pirns at which time the compressed air is actuated to expand the grippers. The grippers are then moved downward while remaining in engagement with the empty yarn pirns until a new support 50 containing empty yarn pirns has arrived at the transfer station 60. Thereupon, the direction of travel of the chains 24 is reversed, and the grasped empty yarn pirns are pulled upward from the mandrels 54 and conducted to the conveyor 11 by corresponding movement of the chains 24. The empty pirns are then placed onto the empty mandrels 16 of the conveyor belt 14 which are at the loading station. The compressed air is then released from the grippers and the bar 28 of the transfer apparatus 12 is again moved to grip the next six empty yarn pirns in the storage unit 13. At the same time, the conveyor belt is displaced in the direction indicated by the arrow 64 (FIG. 1) until the next six empty mandrels 16 have arrived at the loading station to receive the next six empty pirns.

As can be seen in FIG. 2, the horizontal distance be- I tween the two chains 24 of the transfer device 12 is smaller than the distance between the two chains 44 of the storage unit 13. By this arrangement, the bar 28 of the transfer apparatus 12 does not strike against the arms 52 when the bar approaches the support at the transfer station 60.

Both the bar 28 of the transfer device 12 and the supports 50 of the storage device 13 can swing in the manner described above. This could result in the danger that the yarn packages fed to the storage unit 13 will not arrive concentrically with the mandrels 54 located at the transfer station 60, particularly when operating at relatively high speeds of advance. In order to counteract this danger, suitable guide means may be associated with the bar 28 and support 50 in order to reduce or prevent any possible swinging movements.

One particularly advantageous way of preventing swinging or pendulum movements of the bar 28 of the transfer apparatus 12 is shown in FIG. 5. In the illustrated embodiment, a strap 66 having a horizontal linear slide slot 68 is provided with a central, downwardly directed extension 70 whose laterally extending arm 72 is slidably connected to a fixed vertical guide 74, said guide being positioned alongside one of the two chains 24 along the center of its path. In the slot 68 there is received a horizontally translatable slide block 76 which is fixedly connected to one end of the bar 28. The strap 66, due to its associated linear extension 70, follows the upward and downward movements of the bar 28, and the bar 28 in turn is displaced linearly in the slot 68 upon passage of the bar 28 over the upper curvature of its path. In this way, the bar 28 is prevented from turning on its longitudinal axis, while the chain link supporting the bar is able to turn relative to the bar as a result of the pivotal. connection across the pin 80. In this way, the grippers 32 of the transfer apparatus 12 are always held in the same vertical, downwardly directed position.

A further embodiment of a guide is shown in FIG. 6. In this case, there is associated with each support 50 of the storage unit 13 a funnel or V-shaped guide 82 arranged on one or both arms 52 of the associated support. The guide 82 cooperates with a horizontal pin 84 arranged on a downward directed arm 86 carried by the bar 28. The guide 82 is so shaped and arranged that the pin 84 arrives into its lower, straight, narrow region 88 shortly before the yarn pirns come onto the mandrels 54 of the support 50 and in this way centers the yarn pirns with respect to the mandrels 54 during the final approach of the bar 28 toward the support 50.

Instead of the grippers 32 of the transfer device being actuated by compressed air, other suitable purely mechanical grippers could be provided. For example, there can be used the so-called suspension holders such as employed in ring spinning frames for the holding of the flyer bobbins. Such mechanical suspension holders are brought, by means of an associated independent mechanism, into a closed condition upon each insertion into the upper opening of a pi rn to thereby hold the pirn. Upon upward displacement of the pirn or downward displacement of the suspension holder, the mechanism moves out of its locking position and the pirn is again released. Such suspension holders could be substituted without change for the compressed air actuated grippers 32 which have been described above.

In the drawings and specification, there has been set forth a preferred embodiment of the invention, and although specific terms are employed, they are used in a generic and descriptive sense only and not-for purpose of limitation.

That which is claimed is:

1. In a yarn processing apparatus such as a spinning frame or the like and having a plurality of work stations or processing yarn strands and winding the strands onto tubular pirns or the like to form yarn packages, the combination therewith of means extending along one side of the yarn processing apparatus for conveying a plurality of doffed yarn packages in a separated arrangement between a position adjacent the work stations and a loading station,

storage means for storing a plurality of yarn packages and comprising a plurality of horizontal supports, each of said supports including means for holding a plurality of yarn packages in a separated arrangement along the length thereof, and

transfer means for cyclically transferring a plurality of separated yarn packages between said loading station and each of said supports of said storage means, whereby the yarn packages may be transferred between a position adjacent the work stations and said storage means while being main- I tained in a separated arrangement and without contacting each other.

2. The yarn processing apparatus as defined in claim 1 wherein said storage means further comprises means for mounting each of said supports for movement about an endless path of travel, and means operatively controlled bysaid transfer means for sequentially advancing said supports along said path of travel during each cycle of operation by said transfer means.

3. The yarn processing apparatus as defined in claim 2 further comprising means for cyclically actuating said conveying means to move the yarn packages conveyed thereby a predetermined distance upon each cycle of operation by said transfer means.

4. A transfer and storage apparatus for yarn packages or the like and which is adapted to transfer a plurality of vertically disposed yarn packages between a loading station and a storage area and to maintain the packages in a separated arrangement without contacting each other during both the transfer operation and storage, said apparatus comprising storage means for storing a plurality of yarn packages and comprising at least one horizontally directed support, means disposed along said support for holding a plurality of vertically disposed yarn packages in a spaced linear arrangement, and

transfer means for transferring a plurality of yarn packages between said loading station and said support, said transfer means comprising means for selectively and supportingly engaging a plurality of yarn packages disposed in a spaced linear arrangement.

5. The transfer and storage apparatus as defined in claim 4 wherein said means disposed along said support for holding a plurality of vertically disposed yarn packages comprises means for holding the lower ends of such packages, and said means for selectively and supportingly engaging a plurality of yarn packages on said transfer means comprises means for engaging the upper ends of such packages.

6. A transfer and storage apparatus for yarn packages or the like and which is adapted to transfer a plurality of vertically disposed yarn packages between a loading station and a storage area and to maintain the packages in a separated arrangement without contacting each other during both the transfer operation and storage, said apparatus comprising storage means for storing a plurality of yarn packages and comprising a plurality of horizontally directed supports, means disposed along each support for holding one end of a plurality of vertically dis posed yarn packages in a spaced linear arrangement, and means for mounting each of said supports for movement about an endless path of travel, said path of travel including a predetermined transfer station for said supports, and

transfer means for transferring a plurality of yarn packages between said loading station and one of said supports positioned at said transfer station, said transfer means including means for maintaining the transferred yarn packages in a spaced linear arrangement. I

7. The transfer and storage apparatus as defined in claim 6 wherein said means for maintaining the transferred yarn packages in a space linear arrangement comprises means for supportingly engaging the end opposite said one end of such packages.

8. A transfer and storage apparatus for yarn packages or the like and which is adapted to transfer a plurality of vertically disposed yarn packages between a loading station and a storage area and to maintain the packages in a separated arrangement without contacting each other during both the transfer operation and storage, said apparatus comprising storage means for storing a plurality of yarn packages and comprising a plurality of horizontally directed supports, means disposed along each support for holding the lower ends of a plurality of vertically disposed yarn packages in a spaced linear arrangement, and means for mounting each of said supports for movement about an endless path of travel, said path of travel including a predetermined transfer station for said supports, and

transfer means for transferring a plurality of yarn packages between said loading station and one of said supports positioned at said transfer station, said transfer means comprising means for selectively and supportingly engaging the upper ends of a plurality of yarn packages disposed in a spaced linear arrangement, and means for transferring said engaging means and supported yarn packages between a first position immediately above the loading station and a second position immediately above said transfer station.

9. The transfer and storage apparatus as defined in claim 8 further including means for cyclically actuating said transfer means, and means operatively controlled by said transfer means for sequentially advancing said supports along said path of travel during each cycle of operation by said transfer means to thereby bring a dif- 12 ferent support to said transfer station after each cycle of operation.

10. The transfer and storage apparatus as defined in claim 9 wherein said means for selectively andvsupportingly engaging the upper ends of a plurality of yarn packages comprises a horizontally disposed bar, a plurality of downwardly directed individual grippers positioned in spaced relation along said bar, each. of said grippers having a first configuration adapted to engage a yarn package and a second configuration adapted to release a yarn package, and means for selectively controlling the configuration of said grippers whereby a plurality of spaced linearly arranged packages may be simultaneously engaged or released.

11. The transfer and storage apparatus as defined in claim 10 wherein said means for transferring said engaging means comprises a pair of sprockets disposed in spaced vertical alignment, means for mounting said sprockets for rotation about parallel horizontal axes, a chain entrained about said sprockets, a laterally extending arm carried by said chain, means pivotally connecting said bar to said arm, and means for rotating said sprockets such that said arm and said bar may follow the chain in its movement about said sprockets.

12. The transfer and storage apparatus as defined in claim 11 further including means for maintaining a predetermined orientation of said bar while the same is moved about said sprockets such that said grippers are maintained in a downwardly directed position.

13. The transfer and storage apparatus as defined in claim 12 wherein said means for maintaining a predetermined orientation of said bar comprises a slide block fixedly carried by said bar, a strap including a horizontal slot and a vertically directed extension, said slide block being slidably disposed in said slot, a fixed vertical guide, and means for slidably connecting said vertically directed extension to said guide to preclude rotational movement of said strap and thus said slide block and bar during movement of the bar about said sprockets.

14. The transfer and storage apparatus as defined in claim 11 wherein said means disposed along each support for holding the lower ends of a plurality of yarn packages comprises a plurality of spaced upwardly directed mandrels, said mandrels being adapted to enter the lower end of the yarn packages, and said transfer and storage apparatus further including means for guiding the relative position of said supports and said bar during the transfer operation such that the packages being transferred to a support positioned at the transfer station will be guided to rest over the mandrels on such support.

15. The transfer and storage apparatus as defined in claim 14 wherein said means for guiding the relative position of said support and said bar includes a downwardly directed arm carried by said bar, a horizontally directed pin carried at the 'lower end of said downwardly directed arm, and a V-shaped guide carried by said bar and positioned to receive said pin such that during the approach of said bar toward said support the pin enters said V-shaped guide.

16. A storage apparatus for storing a plurality of yarn packages or the like in a separated arrangement, said storage apparatus comprising a framework including two horizontally spaced, vertically directed members defining inwardly facing opposed side surfaces,

I a like number of sprockets carried by each of said vertically directed members along said inwardly facing side surfaces, each of said sprockets being mounted for rotation about a horizontal axis and with the axis of each of the sprockets on one of said vertically directed members being coaxial with one of the sprockets on the other of said vertically directed members,

an endless chain entrained about the sprockets of each vertically directed member,

a plurality of horizontally directed supports extending between the two chains, means for pivotally interconnecting each of said supports to said chains, and

means disposed along each of said supports for holding one end of a plurality of vertically disposed yarn packages in a spaced linear arrangement,

whereby the supports may be moved with the chains along a path of travel defined by the sprockets such that the supports may be sequentially brought to a predetermined transfer station on said path of travel while the yarn packages are maintained in a vertically disposed and separated arrangement.

- 17. The storage apparatus as defined in claim 16 further including interconnecting means extending between at least one of the sprockets on one of said vertically directed members and at least one of the sprockets on the other of said vertically directed members for effecting concurrent rotation of all the sprockets.

18. The storage apparatus as defined in claim 16 further including brake means for resisting rotation of the sprockets to thereby prevent undesired movement of the supports.

19. The storage apparatus as defined in claim 16 wherein said means for pivotally interconnecting each of said supports to said chains comprises a pair of vertically directed arms, each of said arms being pivotally connected to the associated chains adjacent the upper end of the arm and being fixedly connected to one end of the associated support adjacent the lower end of the arm, whereby the center of gravity of the yarn packages heldon each support is positioned below the pivotal axis formed between the arms and chains.

20. The storage apparatus as defined in claim 16 wherein said framework includes a plurality of supporting wheels mounted adjacent the lower end thereof such that the apparatus is portable and may be manually wheeled between various locations.

PatentNo. 3,788,054 Dated Jannary 29","19'74 Inventm-(S) Gerhard Haussmann et a1 It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shownbelow:

On the coverpage, Column 1, Line 6, change "Tertilmaschinen" to --Texti1maschinen--;

Column 10,. Line 15, change '.'or" to "for";

Signed and sealed this 11th day of June 1971;.

(SEAL) Attest: I

EDWARD M.FLETGHER,JR. I c MARSHALL 1mm Attesting Officer Commissioner of Patents O po'mso (169) USCOMM-DC seam-ps9 i U.S. GOVERNMENT- FRINTING OFFICE 1 l9! 036-33l

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Classifications
U.S. Classification57/281, 198/487.1, 57/266, 198/347.3, 198/468.2, 198/577, 198/426
International ClassificationD01H9/00, D01H9/18, B65H67/06
Cooperative ClassificationD01H9/18
European ClassificationD01H9/18