Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3788511 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 29, 1974
Filing dateAug 16, 1971
Priority dateAug 16, 1971
Publication numberUS 3788511 A, US 3788511A, US-A-3788511, US3788511 A, US3788511A
InventorsMarsh R
Original AssigneeMarsh R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Protective jacket and base for pressure vessel
US 3788511 A
Abstract
A pressure vessel, particularly of the type used in water softening service is encased in a light weight protective jacket preferably molded in one piece from a resilient plastic material. In cross section the jacket is of undulant configuration comprising longitudinally extending grooves and ridges with the inner surfaces of the groove portions in surface engagement with the outer surface of the tank and the inner surfaces of the ridge portions spaced from the surface of the tank, the jacket being capable of expansion and contraction in a radial direction in bellows or accordian fashion. The jacket fits over the tank from the top and at the bottom is provided with a tank supporting base that interlocks with the jacket to retain the tank within the jacket. At its opposite ends the jacket is provided with hand grip recesses to facilitate handling of the jacketed tank. Externally the jacket resembles a fluted column.
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

[ 1 PROTECTIVE JACKET AND BASE FOR PRESSURE VESSEL [76] Inventor: RobertE. Marsh, 5521 Willow View Rd., Rasine, Wis.

22 Filed:- Aug. 16, 1971 [21] App1.N0.:172,110

[52] U.S.Cl. 220/9 R, 220/69, 220/72 [51] Int. Cl.... B65d 25/18 [58] Field of Search... 220/9 R, 9 A, 9 E, 9 F, 9 M,

220/10, 12, 17, 66, 69, 83, DIG. 1, 72, 76,

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,507,416 4/1970 D0uglas et a]. 215/12 R 3,066,822- 12/1962 Watter 220/15 2,607,509 8/1952 Hess 220/10 2,996,213 8/1961 Mitchell et a1 220/9 R 3,604,588 9/1971 Winnick 220/60 R 2,448,521 9/1948 Dwyer 220/96 926,648 6/1909 Friend 220/10 3,349,940 10/1969 Cornelius 3,081,905 3/1963 Schulze et a 220/66 3,159,306 12/1964 220/66 3,335,903 8/1967 [111 3,788,511 [451 Jan. 2 9 19 74 3/1969 Hinslow 220/66 3/1963 Goodman 220/15 [57] Afis'rmi c'r A pressure vessel, particularly of the type used in water softening service is encased ina light weight protective jacket preferably molded in one piece from i a resilient plastic material. In cross section the jacket is of undulant configuration comprising longitudinally extending grooves and ridges with the inner surfaces of the groove portions in surface engagement with the outer surface of the tank and the inner surfaces of the ridge portions spaced from the surface of the tank, the jacket being capable of expansion and contraction in a radial direction in bellows or accordian fashion. The jacket fits over the tank from the top and at the bottom is provided with a tank supporting base that interlocks with the jacket to retain the tank within the jacket. At its opposite ends the jacket is provided with hand grip recesses to facilitate handling of the jacketed tank. Externally the jacket resembles a fluted column.

16 Claims, Drawing Figures PROTECTIVE JACKET AND BASE FOR PRESSURE vEssEL BACKGROUND THE INVENTION 'Water softening equipment primarily intended for use on the premises of residences is generally of one or the other of two types. 'One type is self regenerating and is comprised of two principal compartments or tanks, one containing a quantity of resin through contact with which hard water is treated to effect a softening, and the other containing 'salt from which a brine is derived and at intervals the brine is brought into association with the resin to regenerate it andrenew its capability of softening water. Suchan installation may be considered as permanent and requires two maintenance steps by or for the occupant of the residence, one being the replenishment of the supply of salt as it is consumed and. the other being the control-of valving equipment, either manually orautomatically, at predetermined intervals to effect the regeneration of the resin.

The other type of installation is comprised of only one compartment or tank, namely the one which conof the resin on the residential premises but the tank is readilyremovable and replaceable by another like it, and it is the custom of suppliers of this type of tank to render a resin. regenerating service commonly known as ExchangeTank Service, in accordance with which, at predetermined intervals a tank containing regenerated resinis deliveredfto and installed on the customers premises, and the tankapproaching exhaustion of its water softening capability is returned to the suppliers premises for regeneration. It is with tanks for the exchange-type'of service that the present invention is primarilyconcerned.

Tanks for water softeners of this type have for the most part been fabricated of metal, usually steel, so that they will resist corrosion and damage during the many handlings to which the tank is subjected during its life. A typical steel tank for a residential water softener usually hasa weight 40 to 45 pounds. When there is added to this a normal charge ofresin weighing approximately 50 pounds, .water weighing 15. to 20 poundsand hardware weighing 5 to pounds, the result is a heavy object that is difficult, if not actually impossible, for one man to handle. If it is necessary for the delivery vehicle to be manned by a driver and a helper an expense is involved which could be avoided if the weight could be limited to an amount that could be easily handled by one man.

. One approach that has been considered is the fabrication of the tank of plastic instead of metal. Generally speaking, plastic is frangible and tends to be easily damaged under rough handling. In addition hairline cracks may occur which may go unnoticed. Some of I these disadvantages of theplasticftank may be avoided by providing a thick walled plastic tank. Such a tank is likely to approach or equal in weight that of a metal tank and is also likely to be more expensive than a metal tank of adequate strength and of the same capacity. R

I Still anotherapproach to lightening the weight of the tank is a filament wound tank which consists of a liner molded from a plastic and over'wound with a fiberglass filament to provide-the necessary strength. Such a tank may be lighter than metal but is likely to be consideratains the resin. There is 'no provision for regeneration bly more costly than ametal tank and is also likely to deteriorate and fail from abrasive effects of rough handling if the quantity of material used in its construction can be limited to an amount that is economically feasible by comparison with the cost of a metal tank and that is sufficiently lower in weight than a metal tank to achieve the desired handling ease.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In order to reduce the weight of a tank sufficiently to enable the handling of a tank by one man without undue strain, it is contemplated in accordance with the present invention, to provide a plastic tank to contain the resin, the water and the accessories and to enclose the tank in a plastic jacket to absorb the impacts and abrasions of rough handling and to protect the tank from damage. A tank having a diameter of 8 inches and a height of 36 inches, fully as durable and as satisfactory in all respects as a cold rolled steel tank of that size that would weigh from 40 to pounds, is comprised, in accordance with the invention, of a plastic tank weighing about 8 pounds and a plastic jacket weighing about 4 pounds. Thus a saving in weight of 28 to 33 pounds is effected. Further weight reduction may be accomplished .by substituting for steel accessories, comprised of a closure cap adapted to be connected to inlet and outlet water piping and a collector tube extending generally from one end of the tank to the other inside the tank, which in steel, would weigh from 5 to 10 pounds, corresponding accessory components made from plastic, the total weight of which would be on the order of 2 pounds. The result would be a water softener unit weighing about pounds, which is 30 to 40 poundsless than its steel equivalent.

I In accordance with the preferred embodiment of the invention, the molded jacket for the tank is comprised of alternate grooves and. ridges so that in cross section the wall of the jacket is undulant. The portions of the wall of the jacket that form the grooves are in contact with the exterior of the enclosed tank and the portions of the wall of the jacket that form the ridges are spaced from the surface of the enclosed tank. The internal diameter of the jacket, measured at the inner surface of the grooves, may be slightly less than the external diameter of the enclosed tank, so that a slight force may be required to fit the jacket over thetank, the diameter of the jacket expanding slightly at the grooves and the expansion being accommodated by the ridges in a manner comparable with the expansion afforded by a bellows or accordian folded structure. In this manner the jacket is caused to cling to the surface of the tank. The jacket provides the protection that makes feasible the use of the plastic tank. The ridge portions of the jacket, being out of contact withtheenclosed tank, will absorb jolts without transmitting them to the surface of the tank. The ridges protect the intervening grooves, the inner surfaces of which are in surface contact with the tank, and lessen to a very substantial extent the likelihood of the application of damaging shocks to the grooves. The alternate ridges and grooves minimize the likelihood of abrasive rubbing together of the jacketed tanks when they are being transported on a vehicle, because of the meshing or interlocking of adjacent standing tanks in a manner similar to that of intermeshed gears.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS For a complete understanding of the invention refershown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a plan view looking downwardly on the top of the jacketed tank shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 5 is a horizontal sectional view taken approximately on the line 5-5 of FIG. 3; 1

FIG. 6 is a view of the bottom of the jacketed tank;

FIG. 7 is an enlarged fragmentary showing of a portion of the bottom of FIG. 2; and

FIG. 8 is a horizontal sectional view taken generally on the line 88 of FIG. 7.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION Referring now to the drawings and particularly to FIG. 2 the reference numeral 12 designates a pressure tank of the configuration and dimensions generally employed as a water softening tank. Typical dimensions are a diameter of 8 inches and a length or height of 36 inches to provide a'volume of approximately of one cubic foot and a liquid capacity of approximately of 7 gallons. The tank 12 is cylindrical throughout most of its length but may be rounded at both ends into a configuration approximating hemispheres. The tank 12 is closed at the bottom and is of greater thickness at the top than at the cylindrical portions or at the bottom, and is provided at the top with a threaded aperture 14 to receive threadedly a closure cap 16. It will be apparent that the reason for the thickening at the top is to provide several turns of threads in the aperture 14 to be entered by the threaded shank 18 of the cap 16. The cap 16 has inner and outer annular shoulders 20 and 22 and the lower surface of the annular shoulder 20 may be provided with an annular groove to receive a gasket, which may be an O-ring. By means of the threaded shank 18'of-the cap 16, the annular shoulder 20 of the cap and the gasket 24 a liquid tight seal between the cap 16 and the tank 12 may be established.

The cap 16 is provided with compartments 26 and 28 separated by a barrier 30. The compartment 26 is in communication with the interior of the tank 12 and with a threaded receptacle 32 to which connection may be made to a pipe carrying water to be treated. The compartment 28 is in communication with a collector tube 34 and also with a threaded receptacle 36 to which connection may be made to a pipe to carry treated water to points of utilization. The collector tube 34 terminates near the bottom of the tank 12 and is in communication with the interior of the tank at or in the vicinity of the lowerend of the collector tube, in accordance with usual practices.

When the tank is to be used for softening water it is provided, as is well known, with a bed of resin extending upwardly from the bottom of the tank a substantial distance. Water to be treated enters through threaded receptacle 32 and compartment 26 and filters downwardly through the bed of resin, where an exchange of ions takes place, thereby softening the water. The softened water rises through the collector tube 34 and flows through the compartment 28 and threaded receptacle 36 to a connected pipe when a tap associated with that pipe is opened.

A material that is suitable for forming a molded tank of the type shown in FIG. 2 is a thermo-setting polyester resin reinforced with fiberglass. Equal parts of these materials will provide a tank capable of adequately withstanding pressures normally encountered in water softening service. One known source of pressure vessels of this type, is STRUCTURAL FIBERS, INC., of Chardon, Ohio.

The jacket in accordance with the preferred embodiment of the invention, which renders feasible the use of tanks of the type hereinbefore described for interchangable tank water softening service is identified, in the several figures of the drawings, by the reference numeral 40. The jacket is open-ended at the bottom, and dome-shaped at the top so that when it is fitted over the tank 12 the inner surface of its upper end will rest upon the top of the tank 12. At its upper end the jacket 40 is provided with an aperture 42 to receive the tank cap 16, and the diameter of the aperture is greater than that of the annular shoulder 20 but less than the outside diameter of the cap 16 so that the annular shoulder 22 of the cap 16 will confine the jacket in position on the tank 12.

From a point near the top of the jacket 40 to a point near the open end at the bottom the jacket is undulant in the configuration of its wall cross-section, producing an exterior appearance of alternating ridges or ribs 44 and grooves 46 extending longitudinally of the jacket, producing an external appearance resembling a fluted column. It may be noted by examining FIG. 5 that a cross sectional showing of the jacket 40 resembles in contour a graphical representation of a clipped waveform, such as a sine wave wrapped around and encircling the tank 12, the clipping being generally symmetrical about the zero axis of the wave-form to produce the inner and outer dwells, which become the grooves 46 and ribs 44, respectively, these dwells being curved into conformity with inner and outer circles having as their centers the axis of the tank 12 by virtue of the wrapping of the wave-form about the wall of the tank. The resultant rib and groove surfaces are in panel configuration conformed to cylinders coaxial with the tank 12. In the embodiment of the invention shown in the drawings there are eight ridges 44, on 45 centers, and

eight intervening grooves 46, on 45 centers and the angles subtended by individual ridges and grooves are generally of the same magnitude.

The inner surfaces of the grooves are conformed to a circle the diameter of which is preferably slightly less than the outside diameter of the tank 12. Thus when the jacket is placed above the tank 12 and is moved downwardly to fit it to the tank it must be forced downwardly, accompanied by expansion of the circle of the inner surfaces of the grooves 46. The portions of the wall of the jacket 40 that form the ridges or ribs 44 are spaced outwardly from the circle of the inner surfaces of the grooves, so that when the jacket 40 is fitted to the tank 12 the portions of the wall of the jacket forming the ridges 44 stand away from the surface of the tank 12. The ridges 44 are shown as being conformed to a circle that is concentric with the circle of the grooves. Because of the undulant cross-section configuration of the wall of the jacket 40 the ridges 44 accommodate expansion of the circle of the inner surfaces of the grooves 46 the action being comparable with that of a bellows. The result of the expansion of the jacket is a deformation from its free state and because the plastic material of which it is made has a memory, as will be described hereinafter, it seeks to return to its free state configuration and in so doing applies pressure between the inner surfaces of the grooves 46 and the outer surface of the wall of the tank 12, causing the jacket to cling to the tank 12.

A material that is relatively inexpensive and is well suited to the type of service to which the jacket 40 will be subjected in use is high-density linear polyethylene. It is a material with a memory so that when force-fitted over the tank it hugs the tank, as previously mentioned. Also because of the memory it resists denting, or if dented beyond its resistive capability dents may be popped out without difficulty. When the material is cold, a sharp impact blow will not produce a fracture. At elevated temperatures it retains its strength and does not flow. Other plastics are known having similar properties and accordingly being suitable for use in the making of jackets in accordance with the present invention but some of them are relatively expensive by comparison with high-density linear polyethylene.

In order that the round-ended tank 12 may stand upright in a stable manner a base 50 is provided. The base 50 is made of plastic and may be injection molded or vacuum formed. A material that has properties well suited to use as a base for the tank 12 is polyvinyl chloride. As shown in FIGS. 2 and 7 the central portion of the base 50 is dished on a radius corresponding to the outer surface of the bottom of the tank 12 so that the tank will rest stably on the base 50. From its center the base 50 has radially extending re-enforcing ribs 52, shown in FIG. 6. Peripherally the base 50 has a vertically extending flange 54 and at intervals, preferably on 90 degree centers, there is an offset in the flange 54 in a direction radially outwardly from the flange, indicated in FIGS. 2 and 7 by the reference numeral 56. The offset 56 preferably subtends an angle somewhat smaller than the angle subtended by the ridges 44 in the jacket 40.

At its lower end the jacket 40 is provided with relief offsets 58, also preferably on 90 degree centers, in alignment with alternate ones of the ridges 44 and subtending an angle slightly exceeding that of the offsets 56 in the base 50.

In order tov complete the assembly of the reinforced tank tht jacket 40 is brought down from the top on the tank 12 and the base 50 is brought into position at the bottom of the tank with the relief offsets 58 in alignment with the offsets 56 in the base 50. As shown in FIG. 2 the outer surface of the offset 56 in the base has a taper 60 and as the taper 60 encounters the relief offset 58 in the jacket 40 and pressure is applied between the base 50 and the jacket 40 the taper operates as a wedge to facilitate entry of the offsets 56 of the base into the relief offsets 58 of the jacket. The bottom of the jacket 40 may expand, the plastic of which the jacket is made accommodating this expansion. As the application of pressure between the jacket and the base is continued, the offset 56 moves inwardly of the relief offset 58, and the flange 54 may perhaps yield instead of or in addition to the yielding of the bottom of the jacket 40 accommodate the continued movement. As soon as the offset in the base moves above the lower end of the ridge 40 with which it is aligned a snap action takes place by virtue of which the offset 56 in the base enters the inside of the ridge as the two plastic components return to their normal conditions and the offset 56 becomes a lug to lock the base to the jacket 40.

In the specific arrangement shown in the drawings and as indicated most completely in FIG. 1 the relief offsets 58 that facilitate the fitting of the offset lugs 56 in the base 50 into the jacket 40 are positioned below and in alignment with alternate ones of in ridges 46 of the jacket. Thus the relief offsets 58 are on 90 centers, leaving a substantial space between adjacent ones. In the space intervening two of the relief offsets 58, and accordingly below the bottom of one of the ridges 44 the wall of the jacket 40 is provided with a hand-grip aperture 64, shown in FIGS. 2 and 3. correspondingly, the flange 54 of the base 50 is provided, between two of the offset lugs 56, with a hand-grip aperture 66. When the base 50 is being fitted to the jacket 40 the base is oriented relative to the jacket to bring the handgrip apertures 64 and 66 into registry. Thus there is provided at the bottom of the jacketed tank a hand-grip aperture into which the fingers of one hand of a handler may be inserted.

At the upper end of the jacket 40 the ridge 43 that is i alignment with the hand-grip aperture 64 extends upwardly above the dome-shaped end. Where this one ridge extends above the others it is widened and curved inwardly toward the axis of the jacket into an inverted U-shape, leaving an aperture 70, preferably of substantially the same width as the aperture 64, facing toward the cap 16 to provide a second hand-grip at the top of the tank assembly. The hand-grip aperture in the extended and widened portion 68 may be reinforced and strengthened by an offset 72. By means of the handgrip apertures 70 and 64, the fingers of one hand entering the aperture 64 inwardly radially of the tank assembly and the fingers of the other hand entering the aperture 70 outwardly radially of the tank assembly, the tank may be lifted and carried with reasonable ease.

The jacket hereinbefore described may be molded in one piece, without seams, including the ribs and grooves, the relief offsets 58 for facilitating insertion of the base 50 and the hand-grip portion 68 by a process known as blow-molding. The blow-molding process avoids the occurrence of strains in the plastic so that the resulting product is stress-free.

As previously stated, it is of the essence of the invention that the jacket be made of plastic. One reason for this is that plastic has a memory and is generally self correcting in case of denting whereas a metallic jacket, once dented, remains dented. A plastic jacket provides thermal insulation and also prevents or reduces the condensation of moisture in the atmosphere on the surface of the unit. In this connection it will be understood that the tank 12 might be of metal instead of plastic, of lighter gauge metal than the usual unjacketed metal tank because of the strengthening and reinforcing afforded by the plastic jacket. The thermal insulation and the prevention of sweating due to condensation could then be of great significance. The plastic tank and jacket, or the combination of a metal tank and a plastic jacket and base, eliminate the possibility of sparks, which is an ever-present hazard of exposed metal tanks if used or handled where inflammable vapors are likely to be present.

The configuration of the jacket, involving alternating longitudinal grooves, the inner surfaces of which are in engagement with the surface of the tank, and hollow ridges, the inner surfaces of which are spaced from the surface of the tank is also of the essence of the invention. The bellows or accordian-like undulation of the jacket wall completely eliminates requirements for close tolerances in the diameter of jacketed tanks, and accommodates itself to thermal expansion and contraction of the tank while always exerting a gripping action on the surface of the tank. The hollow spaces provided by the ridges protect the jacketed tank by absorbing mechanical shock so that the shock is not transferred directly to the tank at a localized point. The interlocking or meshing of a plurality of jacketed tanks, whether they are stood on end or are stacked lying on their sides, affords a stability and an absence of likelihood of movement of the tanks with respect to one another, so that relatively little support or restraint is neededv Because of the meshing of jacketed tanks with one another the possibility of relative rotation among them and consequent surface abrasion is minimized. Moreover the tank having a jacket of the type disclosed herein, if lying on its side free of other tanks, is much less subject to rolling than a cylindrical tank.

What is claimed is:

1. A jacketed vessel comprising an elongated tank and a jacket engaged over the outer surface of the tank, the jacket being open at at least one end to receive the tank and having generally an undulant cross-sectional configuration wherein substantial portions of the jacket wall are in panel configuration contoured to conformance with the outside surface of the tank and, viewed in cross-section, form separated components of a closed geometrical figure matching that of a crosssection of the wall of the tank with the panelconfigured portions of the jacket in tight surface-tosurface contact with the outside surface of the tank to substantially inhibit relative movement between the tank and the jacket, and the remainder of the jacket wall being out of contact with the surface of the tank and forming ribs enclosing hollow spaces between the jacket wall and the tank surface, with the intervening panel-configured portions of the jacket that have surface contact with the tank forming grooves.

2. A jacketed vessel in accordance with claim 1 in which said ribs include substantial portions contoured to conformance with the outside surface of the tank and, viewed in cross-section, form separated components of a closed geometrical figure matching and symmetrically positioned with respect to that of a crosssection of the tank in outwardly spaced relation to the outside surface of the tank whereby the crss-sectional configuration of the jacket resembles a clipped waveform wrapped around the tank.

3. A jacketed vessel comprising a substantially cylindrical tank and a plastic jacket engaged over the outer surface of the tank, the jacket having a cross-sectional configuration generally resembling a symmetrically clipped wave-form encircling the tank to provide a plurality of parallel, longitudinally extending, hollow ridges and grooves disposed alternately about the periphery thereof, the bases of the respective grooves being cylindrically coaxial with the tank and in tight surface-to-surface engagement with the outer surface of the tank and the ridges being spaced away from the tank surface and defining hollow spaces between the jacket wall and tank surface;

the portions of the jacket wall representing the inner dwell of the clipped wave-form and forming the grooves conform to the configuration of a cylinder coaxial with the tank and having a predetermined diameter; and

the portions of the jacket wall forming the ridges include components representing the outer dwell of the clipped-wave form and conforming to the configuration of a cylinder coaxial with the tank and having a diameter greater than that first-mentioned cylinder, and also include components extending between the two cylindrical configurations and representing the rising and falling portions of the clipped wave-form.

4. A jacketed vessel comprising a substantially cylindrical tank and a plastic jacket engaged over the outer surface of the tank, the jacket having a generally cylindrical wall formed into a plurality of parallel, longitudinally extending, hollow ridges and grooves disposed alternately about the periphery thereof, the bases of the respective grooves being in tight engagement with the outer surface of the tank and the ridges being spaced away from the tank surface and defining hollow spaces between the jacket wall and tank surface, one of the ridges of the jacket extending beyond the other ridges at one end of thejacket and being widened where it extends beyond the others and provided in the widened extension with an aperture to accommodate the insertion ofa hand for gripping the jacket at the widened extension.

5. A jacketed vessel in accordance with claim 4 in which the ridge portion having the widened extension terminates short of the other end of the jacket and the wall of the jacket beyond the end of that ridge portion is provided with an aperture to accommodate the insertion of a hand for gripping the jacket at that end.

6. A jacketed vessel in accordance with claim 5 in which the tank is contoured at the point of location of the aperture in the wall of the jacket to provide clearance for the insertion of a hand.

7. A jacketed vessel comprising an elongated tank having an access opening in at least one of its ends and a plastic jacket engaged over the outer surface of the tank, the jacket being open at one end to receive the tank and at the other end to expose the access opening and having generally an overall cross-sectional configuration matching the cross-sectional configurarion of the tank and having its wall formed into a plurality of parallel, longitudinally extending, hollow ridges and grooves disposed alternately about the periphery thereof, the bases of the respective grooves being in tight engagement with the outer surface of the tank and the ridges being spaced away from the tank surface and defining hollow spaces between the jacket wall and tank surface, and a closure base for the jacket having a central portion contoured to match the bottom of the tank and adapted to support the tank and a peripheral vertically extending flange dimensioned to enter the open end of the jacket and have contact with the inner surface of the wall of the jacket at that end and having protrusions on the flange spaced to be alignable with certain of the ridges of the jacket and adapted to enter those ridges.

8. A jacketed vessel in accordance with claim 7 in which at the open end of the jacket the ridges of the jacket terminate short of the end of the jacket leaving a band at the end of the jacket dimensioned to have substantially the same tight engagement with the outer surface of the entering tank as the bases of the grooves and forming pockets at the ends of the ridges to retentively engage the protrusions on the peripheral flange of the-closure base.

9. A jacketed vessel in accordance with claim 8 in which the peripheral flange of the closure base snugly engages the inside of the band at the open end of the jacket, and the protrusions on the flange of the base extend outside the confines of the band when retentively engaged by the pockets. 10. A jacketed vessel in accordance with claim 9 in which the jacket and the closure base are molded of plastic affording sufficient resilience as between the jacket and the closure base to accommodate passage of the protrusions on the flange of the base through the interior of the band at the open end of the jacket and to cause self-entry of the protrusions into the pockets at the ends of the ridges of the jacket.

11. A jacketed vessel in accordance with claim 10 in which the protrusions are outward offsets in the flange of the base and are at least as readily yieldable to accommodate entry of the baseinto the jacket as the other portions of the flange.

12. A jacketed vessel in accordance with claim 8 in which the band at the open end of the jacket is provided with relief offsets spaced around the band in correspondence with the protrusions on the closure base to, facilitate entry of the protrusions into the band.

13. A jacketed vessel in accordance with claim 12 in which the protrusions on the flange of the base are beveled outwardly from their free edges to facilitate entry of the protrusions into the band at the open end of the jacket.

14. A jacket for an elongated water-softener tank having an access opening in at least one of its ends, the jacket having its wall formed into a plurality of parallel, longitudinally extending, hollow ridges and grooves disposed alternately about the periphery thereof, the bases of the respective grooves being conformed over a major portion of their widths to the contour of the tank so as to be adapted for tight surface-to-surface engagement with the outer surface of the tank and the ridges being thereby spaced away from the tank surface and defining hollow spaces between the jacket wall and tank surface.

.15. A jacket for an elongated water-softener tank having an access opening in at least one of its ends, the jacket having its wall formed into a plurality of parallel, longitudinally extending, hollow ridges and grooves disposed alternately about the periphery thereof, the portions of the jacket wall forming the grooves, viewed in cross-section, conformed over a major portion of their widths to the contour of the tank and outlining a closed geometrical figure and adapted to engage tightly the outer surface of a tank having the same cross-sectional configuration and at least as great cross-sectional dimensions as the cross-sectional dimensions of said closed geometrical figure; and

the portions of the jacket wall forming the ridges,

viewed in cross-section, including components comprising a major portion of the width of the ridges conformed to a closed geometrical figure matching the first-mentioned closed geometrical figure in contour and appreciably exceeding it in area, to provide hollow spaces between the ridges and the wall of an enclosed tank and further including components joined with the groove portions of the jacket.

16. A jacket for an elongated water-softener tank having an access opening in at least one of its ends, the jacket having its wall formed into a plurality of parallel, longitudinally extending, hollow ridges and grooves disposed alternately about the periphery thereof, the portions of the jacket wall forming the grooves, viewed in cross-section outlining a closed geometrical figure and adapted to engage tightly the outer surface of a tank having the same cross-sectional configuration and at least as great cross-sectional dimensions as the dimensions of said closed geometrical figure, and

the portions of the jacket wall forming the ridges,

viewed in cross-section, including components comprising a major portion of the width of the ridges conformed to a closed geometrical figure matching the first-mentioned closed geometrical figure in contour and appreciably exceeding it in area, to provide hollow spaces between the ridges and the wall of an enclosed tank and further including components joined with the groove portions of the jacket,

the ridges terminating short of one end of the jacket thereby forming pockets; and

a closure member associable with that end of the jacket comprising a molded plastic body having a peripheral flange contoured and dimensioned to snugly engage the inside of the wall of the jacket adjacent to said pockets, said flange having outward protrusions spaced to be alignable with certain of the ridges of the jacket and adapted to expand into the clearance afforded by the interior of the ridges and-enter the pockets and be retained by the barrier forming the pockets.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US926648 *Feb 26, 1908Jun 29, 1909Thomas S FriendCorrugated-metal jacket.
US2448521 *May 17, 1943Sep 7, 1948Martin DwyerEmergency signaling device
US2607509 *Dec 24, 1949Aug 19, 1952Mcd Hess AlexanderContainer
US2996213 *Sep 10, 1958Aug 15, 1961Mitchell Lois DContainers
US3066822 *Oct 19, 1959Dec 4, 1962Budd CoComposite missile structure
US3081905 *Apr 7, 1960Mar 19, 1963Culligan IncWater conditioning tank and liner therefor
US3082900 *Jul 21, 1959Mar 26, 1963Foster Grant Co IncMulti-wall insulating receptacle
US3159306 *Jul 3, 1963Dec 1, 1964Culligan IncWater conditioning tank and liner
US3335903 *Feb 28, 1964Aug 15, 1967Standard Oil CoPlastic tanks
US3349940 *Dec 28, 1964Oct 31, 1967Cornelius CoThermally insulated tank
US3434626 *Aug 1, 1966Mar 25, 1969Phillips Petroleum CoPlastic container bottom of increased strength
US3507416 *May 22, 1968Apr 21, 1970Colgate Palmolive CoComposite package
US3604588 *Mar 6, 1969Sep 14, 1971Herman WinnickCan cover and sealer
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4491247 *Apr 2, 1982Jan 1, 1985Nitchman Harold LSystem, apparatus, and method of dispensing a liquid from a semi-bulk disposable container
US4949861 *Nov 14, 1988Aug 21, 1990American National Can CompanyRectangular plastic container with panel support
US4964529 *Jun 30, 1989Oct 23, 1990Houston Robert SGas tank container
US5829629 *Jun 9, 1997Nov 3, 1998Usher; Timothy J.Compressed gas cylinder container
US6386384 *Apr 26, 2000May 14, 2002Amtrol, Inc.Full jacket gas cylinder
US7195031Mar 3, 2005Mar 27, 2007Irwin Industrial Tool CompanyStorage system and protective device for tanks
US7373947Mar 3, 2005May 20, 2008Irwin Industrial Tool CompanyStorage system and protective device for tanks
US7415988Mar 3, 2005Aug 26, 2008Irwin Industrial Tool CompanyStorage system and protective device for tanks
US7703821 *Nov 30, 2005Apr 27, 2010Praxair Technology, Inc.Ergonomic shroud for medical gas cylinders
US7935206 *Apr 16, 2010May 3, 2011Amtrol Licensing Inc.Hybrid pressure vessel with separable jacket
US8136791Oct 18, 2006Mar 20, 2012L'air Liquide Societe Anonyme Pour L'etude Et L'exploitation Des Procedes Georges ClaudeFluid filling and/or extraction control device and tank including one such device
US8156961Oct 18, 2006Apr 17, 2012L'air Liquide Societe Anonyme Pour L'etude Et L'exploitation Des Procedes Georges ClaudeAssembly including a pressurized gas storage tank and a control device for filling the tank with gas and/or extracting gas therefrom
US8225816Oct 18, 2006Jul 24, 2012L'air Liquide Societe Anonyme Pour L'etude Et L'exploitation Des Procedes Georges ClaudePressurized gas filling and distribution head and tank equipped with one such head
US8408247Oct 18, 2006Apr 2, 2013L'Air Liquide, Société Anonyme pour l'Etude et l'Exploitation des Procédés Georges ClaudeElement for controlling filling and/or drawing of a pressurized gas, tank and circuit provided with such an element
US8534312Oct 29, 2008Sep 17, 2013Air Liquide Healthcare America CorporationGas control device with protective cover
US20110168726 *Mar 24, 2011Jul 14, 2011Amtrol Licensing Inc.Hybrid pressure vessels for high pressure applications
US20110278316 *May 10, 2011Nov 17, 2011Bernardo HerzerProtective Cap for Tank
EP1744093A2 *Jun 5, 2006Jan 17, 2007Aygaz Anonim SirketiA cylinder
WO2007048953A1 *Oct 18, 2006May 3, 2007Air LiquideProtection device for a pressurised fluid tank and tank equipped with one such device
WO2008149312A1 *Jun 5, 2008Dec 11, 2008Air LiquideGas control device with protective cover
Classifications
U.S. Classification220/23.91, 220/630, 220/669
International ClassificationB01J47/00, F16J12/00, B01J47/02
Cooperative ClassificationF16J12/00, B01J47/022
European ClassificationB01J47/02B, F16J12/00