Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3789547 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 5, 1974
Filing dateMar 16, 1972
Priority dateMar 16, 1972
Publication numberUS 3789547 A, US 3789547A, US-A-3789547, US3789547 A, US3789547A
InventorsM Chemarin
Original AssigneeM Chemarin
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Manufacturing process for dolls, puppets, plush animals, consisting in the use of two fabrics adherent one to the other
US 3789547 A
Abstract
Improved construction for children's toys such as dolls, animals and the like incorporating selectively located gripping areas on the surface of displaceable body elements thereof that are releasably engageable with grip receptor surfaces on the body portion thereof to permit selective body element displacement and releasable maintenance of displaced positioning thereof.
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Umted States Patent 11 1 1111 3,789,547

Chemarin Feb. 5, 1974 [5 MANUFACTURING PROCESS FOR DOLLS, 3,316,669 5/1967 Nachbar 46/157 PUPPETS, P US ANIMALS CONSISTING 3,370,853 2/1968 Feld et a1 46/D1G. 1

IN THE USE OF TWO FABRICS ADHERENT FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS ONE To THE OTHER 583,408 12/1946 Great Britain 46/151 7 Inventor; M -i Roger Francois Chemarin 409,838 5/1934 Great Britain .1 46/D1G. 1

83, Rue de Maubeuge, Paris, France Primary ExaminerF. Barry Shay [22] Filed: 1972 Attorney, Agent, or FirmNims, Howes, Collison & [21] Appl. No.: 235,428 lsn'er Related US. Application Data [63] Continuation of Ser. No. 883,878, Dec 10, 1969, [57] ABSTRACT aba Improved construction for chlldrens toys such as dolls, animals and the like incorporating selectively 52 US. Cl. 46/158, 46/151 located pp areas on the Surface of displaeeable [51] Int. Cl A63h 3/02 y elements h r of hat are releasa ly engage ble [58] Field of Search. 46/151, 158, DIG. 1, 156, 162 i h grip receptor surfaces on the body portion thereof to permit selective body element displacement [56] References Cited and releasable maintenance of displaced positioning UNITED STATES PATENTS h 1,336,898 4/1920 3 Claims, 9 Drawing Figures Flynn .1 46/151 MANUFACTURING PROCESS FOR DOLLS, PUPPETS, PLUSH ANIMALS, CONSISTING IN THE USE OF TWO FABRICS ADHERENT ONE TO THE OTHER This is a continuation of copending US. Application Ser. No. 883,878, filed Dec. 10, 1969, now abandoned.

One is acquainted with the traditional manufacture of dolls, puppets or plush animals; in order to give them an appearance of life or to modify their postures (for example to make them raise and lower their arms, or sit) one must provide either a system of ball-and-socket joints, washer joints or the like, or a metal framework bracing the interior of the body and of the limbs in some way, assuming, through deformation, the desired posture and, by doing this, to give it a little animation, more especially as far as the arms are concerned. As for the paws or the legs, there is the fact that one can put the toy into a sitting position, but it is still necessary (in the case of a deformable joint, that is to say comprising an internal framework) to manage to bend the paws or legs well at a right angle in order to obtain a satisfactory sitting position.

The operation of these internal joints is, all the same, rather difficult for relatively young children, lacking a little of the strength necessary to bend the framework, and especially of the sense of balance which is indispensable in order to succeed in making the toy bide inpractice and at once.

The operation of ball-and-socket joints or disc joints is easier, but it has a result limited to the single movement from bottom to top or top to bottom, without lateral diversion. Moreover, in the long run, the play assisting, they end up by becoming slack and no longer bide, as it were, and the raised arm drops down, the sitting bear or baby doll falls over on its back or falls forwards.

Besides, none of those traditional joints give sufficient prehensile strength to the arm to allowthem to hold an object, for example; a feeding bottle, a small box, a rattle, a spoon, etc.---, as children like to have their toy do. This is due, in the first place, to the fact that the extremities of the paws or arms do not remain united.

In the same way, the balance in the sitting position would be greatly facilitated if the end of the arms and the end of the paws (or the hands and the end of the feet in the case of small figures having a human appearance) were connected together in the way, moreover, in which a baby holds itself. This is where the proposed method comes in.

It is based upon the utilization of the closure system, very well-known in other respects, composed of two fabrics and based upon the principle of the fastening strength of hundreds of small hooks woven into a fabric and bedding themselves into another fabric, a very supple fabric in the style of astrakhan or knop wools.

A simple pressure brings about the introduction of the hooks which dig into the astrakhan" or knop fabric and thus hold the two fabrics firmly.

Contrariwise, an adequate pull extracts the hooks from the astrakhan or knop and thus frees the two FIG. 1 is a front elevational view of a doll made in accordance with the teachings of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a magnified view of the right hand palm and fingers or left foot sole and toes;

FIG. 3 is a magnified view of the left hand palm and fingers or right foot sole and toes.

FIG. 4 is an elevational view of the doll illustrated in FIG. 1 with the left and right hands thereof fastened together.

FIG. 5 is an elevational view of the doll illustrated in FIG. 1 in sitting position with the right hand and foot and left hand and foot thereof fastened together.

FIG. 6 is a side elevational view of the doll illustrated in FIG. 5.

FIG. 7 is an elevational view of the doll in a standing position having a second preferred embodiment;

FIG. 8 is an elevational view of the doll illustrated in FIG. 7 in a selected position.

FIG. 9 is an elevational view of the doll illustrated in FIG. 8 in another selected position.

Referring to FIGS. 1, 2 and 3 one fixes to'the left limb, for example, the hook fabric to which one will have added anyshape and colour beneficial to the aesthetics of the toy, a claw" if it is a question of an animal, a palm or finger if it is a question of a small figure having a human appearance. One fixes, opposite, to the right limb the receiving astrakhan or knop fabric. The uniting of the two limbs will have the effect of putting the two fabrics in contact, a simple pressure, even very light, and the limbs will remain closely united FIG. 4 by the closure system described. One will equally be able to provide the ends of the lower limbs with the same elements as the upper limbs by arranging them suitably, and the same principle will operate between upper limbs and lower limbs, which will have the effect of giving any desired posture to the toy, which, as a result, will be very easily seated, especially if its balance has been studied in terms of the system used, FIGS. 5 and 6.

Equally, and this is perhaps even more important and even simpler, one will be able to manufacture, in a conventional manner, an animal, doll or puppet, all or part of which will be composed of or covered with a fabric which fulfils the same conditions as the astrakhan or knop fabric. That is to say, a teaseled fabric of synthetic fibres into which the hook fabric (elements of which of adequate shapes will have been arranged at the desired places) will hook itself with the same effectiveness, FIG. 7.

Everything is therefore permitted; from the moment when the claws or the fingers and/or the palms or the soles of the feet have been put into place, and, we recall, solely composed of a hook fabric, one can, in terms of their suppleness, make the toys assume all the positions imaginable, since thenceforth the adherence is no longer a function of sole designated or limited places, but is general; that is to say, over all the surfaces of the fabric with which the toy will have been composed or covered, FIGS. 8 and 9.

A toy will therefore be able to be constructed very economically, without having to incorporate therein costly joint systems, since, both esthetically and practically, the proposed method fulfils the same role as the systems known until now, but whilst permitting a simplicity of manufacture and a certain economy in production costs.

This system is, moreover, very attractive and even fascinating for the child, who, for hours on end, without difficulty and effort will manipulate his toy, the system of which is in itself a game.

Toys manufactured in accordance with the proposed method are, by that very fact, characterized new industrial products.

What I claim is:

1. A childrens toy construction comprising;

a body portion having displaceable body elements extending therefrom,

said extending body elements including hands and feet,

first fastening means of a hooked material secured to said hands and feet and defining thereon first limited fastening areas,

second fastening means of an astrakhan or knop style fabric continuously secured to substantially all of the remaining surfaces of said body portion and body elements and defining thereon second fastening areas of substantially unlimited extent whereby by the bedding of said hooked material into said fabric each of said feet and hands can be secured to said body portion and body elements at an infinite number of locations and the noticeability of said second fastening means as a result of the continuous nature thereof is minimized.

2. A childrens toy construction comprising a body portion having displaceable arm and legs members extending therefrom,

first fastening means of a hooked material secured to the extremity of at least one of said members and defining thereon a first limited fastening area,

second fastening means of an astrakhan or knop style fabric continuously secured to substantially all of the remaining surfaces of said body portion and arm and leg members and defining thereon a second fastening area of substantially unlimited extent whereby by the bedding of said hooked material into said fabric the extremity of at least said one member can be secured to said body portion and arm and leg members at an infinite number of locations and the noticeability of said second fastening means as a result of the continuous nature thereof will be minimized.

3. A childrens toy constructed according to claim 2

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1336898 *Jul 16, 1919Apr 13, 1920Flynn Olice AComic doll
US3316669 *Sep 8, 1964May 2, 1967Peter GoetzEducational device
US3370853 *Jul 7, 1966Feb 27, 1968Feld IrvinProjectile used in staging a bloodless bullfight
GB409838A * Title not available
GB583408A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4122628 *Sep 10, 1976Oct 31, 1978Crowell Florence SThree dimensional doll
US4170086 *Mar 20, 1978Oct 9, 1979Isaac HillsStuffed toy animal
US4235042 *Jun 11, 1979Nov 25, 1980Isaac HillsToss and catch hand puppet
US4249337 *Jul 17, 1979Feb 10, 1981Edson Theresa MBreast feeding doll set
US4373292 *Apr 24, 1981Feb 15, 1983Neat Nap, Inc.Dual character doll
US4387530 *Feb 9, 1981Jun 14, 1983Procreations, Inc.Flexible sheet construction system
US4543278 *Aug 6, 1984Sep 24, 1985Ackerman Gordon KYelcro hooks
US4595618 *Jul 6, 1984Jun 17, 1986Caringer Ronald LVehicle seat belt accessory
US4725462 *Nov 16, 1984Feb 16, 1988Toru KimuraHeat activated indica on textiles
US4729751 *Aug 11, 1986Mar 8, 1988Schiavo Cynthia GDoll with attachment means
US4829601 *Apr 11, 1988May 16, 1989Marilyn SpanierBib family/combination toddler bib and doll
US4964832 *Jul 27, 1989Oct 23, 1990Charles BickoffModular puppet system
US4979921 *Sep 26, 1988Dec 25, 1990Cardillo J DoloresShoulder-supported guardian angel doll
US5071385 *Mar 13, 1990Dec 10, 1991Cox Colleen LPosable figure
US5072998 *Aug 8, 1989Dec 17, 1991Del Cerro Investment Group, Inc.Stuffed anatomical members
US5083966 *Jan 29, 1991Jan 28, 1992Imagination Factory, Ltd.Poseable soft doll
US5097854 *Jan 3, 1990Mar 24, 1992Smith Robert DHair ornaments incorporating hair of the wearer
US5340348 *Jun 29, 1993Aug 23, 1994Schroeder Eric JDoll with patch and cover for releasably engaging a removable item
US5340350 *May 4, 1993Aug 23, 1994Sterman Enterprises, Inc.Multi-positional inflatable auto decoy
US5405266 *Aug 17, 1992Apr 11, 1995Barbara L. FrankTherapy method using psychotherapeutic doll
US5501627 *Nov 8, 1994Mar 26, 1996Ekstein; PennyChildren's toy with peek-a-boo activation
US5597339 *Oct 30, 1995Jan 28, 1997Spector; DonaldStuffed toy figure and offspring assembly
US5713781 *Jun 10, 1996Feb 3, 1998Castanis; GerogeDoll carrier for miniature toy animals
US5897421 *Apr 23, 1998Apr 27, 1999Rink; Donna M.Alpha beanie buddies
US6139328 *Jun 26, 1998Oct 31, 2000Brettco, Inc.Grappling dummy and production thereof
US6705380 *Dec 7, 2001Mar 16, 2004Josephine ScollettaFabric retainer
US6848967 *Sep 26, 2003Feb 1, 2005Ik Sung KimTransformable toy
US8196225 *Sep 10, 2009Jun 12, 2012Nicks Jessica LEmbellished jeans system
US20100112892 *Jan 8, 2009May 6, 2010Lapointe DoreenDoll and pillow case
WO1986002855A1 *Nov 16, 1984May 22, 1986Kimura Ind UsaHeat activated indica on textiles
WO1999054013A1 *Mar 22, 1999Oct 28, 1999Deborah M RinkAlpha beanie buddies
Classifications
U.S. Classification446/369, 428/16, 428/100, 446/390, 446/901, 446/382, 446/385
International ClassificationA63H3/02
Cooperative ClassificationA63H3/02, Y10S446/901
European ClassificationA63H3/02