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Publication numberUS3789549 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 5, 1974
Filing dateMay 30, 1972
Priority dateMay 30, 1972
Publication numberUS 3789549 A, US 3789549A, US-A-3789549, US3789549 A, US3789549A
InventorsYip J
Original AssigneeRodman Ind Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rotatable locking supports for sashes of windows
US 3789549 A
Abstract
A sliding, window-supporting assembly has a rotary locking member in a sliding, supporting block contained within a channel of each vertical weather strip. The circumferential surface of the rotary locking member has diametrical portions like a cylinder and alternate cutoff portions. The diameter of the locking member between the cylindrical portions is somewhat greater than the normal width between those sides of the channel that are perpendicular to the jamb of the window, and when the sash that is keyed to the rotary locking member is rotated to a horizontal position, the cylindrical edges press against the sides of the channel to deform small portions of the sides to hold the sliding, supporting assembly stationary. While the sash is vertical, the cutoff portions of the rotary locking member are adjacent the respective sides of the channel, and the sliding supporting block is free to slide for raising or lowering the sash. A flat spring with a screw adjustment cooperates with a pair of strips along respective sides of the sliding, supporting block to provide a controlled amount of constant friction.
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Yip

United States Patent [19 [451 Feb. 5, 1974 ROTATABLE LOCKING SUPPORTS FOR SASHES OF WINDOWS [75] Inventor:

[73] Assignee:

James K. Yip, Rock Island, 111.

Rodman Industries, Inc., St. Paul,

Primary ExaminerKenneth Downey Attorney, Agent, or F irm-l-lenderson & Strom [57] I ABSTRACT A sliding, window-supporting assembly has a rotary locking member in a sliding, supporting block contained within a channel of each vertical weather strip. The circumferential surface of the rotary locking member has diametrical portions like a cylinder and alternate cutoff portions. The diameter of the locking member between the cylindrical portions is somewhat greater than the normal width between those sides of the channel that are perpendicular to the jamb of the window, and when the sash that is keyed to the rotary locking member is rotated to a horizontal position, the cylindrical edges press against the sides of the channel to deform small portions of the sides to hold the sliding, supporting assembly stationary. While the sash is vertical, the cutoff portions of the rotary locking member are adjacent the respective sides of the channel, and the sliding supporting block is free to slide for raising or lowering the sash. A flat spring with a screw I adjustment cooperates with a pair of strips along respective sides of the sliding, supporting block to provide a controlled amount of constant friction.

.4 Claims, 9 Drawing Figures Patented Feb. 5, 1974 FIG. 2

FIG. 8

FIG. 9

ROTATABLE LOCKING SUPPORTS FOR SASHES OF WINDOWS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to supporting structures for windows and particularly to structures that have balancing springs connected to sliding supports within channels of weather strips and have means for locking these supports in a fixed position to facilitate tilting and removing window sashes.

Windows with sashes that tilt outwardly and downwardly so that both sides of the window panes are readily accessible for washing have become popular. An example of a window-supporting structure that allows the sashes to be tilted is shown in US. Pat. No. 3,462,882 issued to J.M. Brown, Jr. on Aug. 26, I969. Narrow,

vertical channels are centered in the surfaces of,

molded weather strips that contact respective vertical edges of the sash frames. Mounting pins extend horizontally from points near the lower corners of the sashes into the respective narrow channels. The pins terminate in oblong or oval heads within the channels, and balancing springs connect to the pins adjacent the heads. When the sashes are vertical, the oval heads of the pins have their longer dimension vertical in the direction of the channels in the weather strips so that the pins can be moved vertically quite easily. As the sashes are rotated toward a horizontal position, the pins are rotated until their oval heads have their longer dimension across the respective channels. Since the longer dimension is greater than the width of the channels, the sides of the channels are forced apart about the respective heads, and the pins attached to the sashes are locked in position so that the balancing springs will not cause movement of the sashes while they are being cleaned.

A window structure according to US. Pat. No. 3,482,354 issued to D.M. Trout on Dec. 9, I969 provides means for not only tilting the window but also for removing it easily. A sliding block to fit within a weather strip has a balancing spring connected to its top portion and a centrally located rotor that is rotatable between a position that allows the block to slide freely in the weather strip and a position that locks the block firmly to resist the force applied by the spring. A pivot member attached to the frame of the sash has a square shank that engages a mating hole in the rotor. As the window sash is rotated to a horizontal position, the block functions as if it becomes thicker to be jammed between the portion of the weather strip adjacent to the jamb and that portion of the weather strip adjacent to the sash. To obtain this effect, a vertical rib extends inwardly along the side of the weather strip adjacent to the jamb; the adjacent face of the rotor has a mating groove; and when the sash is in a vertical position, the rib enters the groove so that the rotor and block are thin enough to slide easily. As the sash is rotated to a horizontal position, the portion of the rotor adjacent to the groove contacts the top of the rib to cause the sliding block to press against the opposite side of the weather strip adjacent to the frame of the sash. A slot that faces upwardly when the sash is horizontal extends from the edge of the rotor to the hole that receives the square shank that is attached to'the frame of the sash. Therefore, while the sash is horizontal and the supporting block is locked in position, the

bottom edge of the sash can be lifted upwardly to disengage the opposite square shanks from the respective rotors. The sash can then be cocked sideways and removed from the window frame.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION An object of the present invention is to provide in a sliding, supporting block a rotor that locks by being jammed between those sides of the respective weather strip that are perpendicular to the jamb such that the sides are deformed slightly. The rotor is fabricated from moderately resilient material and has cutouts opposite its locking surfaces so that the rotor will be compressed when the force across it exceeds the amount that is required to expand the sides of the weather strip for adequate locking. Also, the bottom of the block is slotted to provide a strip along each of its sides, and an adjustable spring presses outwardly on the side strips to provide a desired amount of constant friction between the block and the weather strip. A locking rotor, according to this invention, presses against those sides of the moderately resilient, plastic weather strip that are perpendicular to the jamb, the perpendicular sides deforming readily to obtain positive locking. The weather strip required for a locking rotor, according to this invention, is easily extruded in that its channel has a simple rectangular shape without special ribs or surfaces to mate with the locking rotor.

The rotor also has a notch between the hole for the pivot pin of the sash and the edge of the rotor to permit the pivot pin to be lifted upwardly from the rotor when the sash is in a horizontal position. The end of the pivot pin is T-shaped and is held captive in the weather strip until the sash is nearly horizontal even when it is not engaging the locking rotor.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIG. 1 is a fragmentary view ofa window, showing in cross section a sliding, supporting block to which a balancing spring is connected;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view ofa supporting block and its locking rotor;

FIG. 3 is an end view of the bottom of the supporting block of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a plan view of the locking rotor as viewed from the end that is inserted into the sliding, supporting block;

FIG. 5 is a cross section of the rotor on the line 5-5 of FIG. 4;

FIG. 6 is an elevation view of the sliding, supporting block in the weather strip while the sash is vertical and the locking rotor has been rotated to permit movement of the sliding, supporting block;

FIG. 7 is a cross section on the line 77 of FIG. 6;

FIG. 8 is an elevation view similar to that of FIG. 6 except the sash is horizontal and the sliding, supporting block is in a locked position; and

FIG. 9 is a cross section on the line 99 of FIG. 8.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT In FIG. 1, a sliding, window-supporting assembly 11 including a sliding, supporting block 12 and a rotary locking member 13 is mounted within a weather strip 14. The upper end of the sliding, supporting block 12 is connected to a usual balancing spring 15, and the rotary locking member 13 is rotatable to be wedged befrom the corner of its frame a pivot pin 17 that is keyed to the rotary locking member 13.Thepin is attached to a flat metal base that is secured to the sash by usual fasteners. The weather strip 14, as shown more clearly in FIG. 7, has outwardly extending tongues 18 to be snapped into respective opposite grooves 19 of the jamb 20 of the window frame.

The sliding, supporting block 12 and its rotary locking member 13 are shown more clearly in FIG. 2. The block is generally rectangular with an upper hook extension 21 for receiving the lower hook of the balancing spring 15. A central, circular opening 22 receives a cylindrical portion or journal 23 of-the rotary locking member 13. The lower end of the block 12 has a pair of slots 24 perpendicular to the face of the block, each slot being a short distance from a respective side of the block to form a respective strip 25 that can have its lower end forced outwardly with moderate pressure. A flat spring 26 (FIGS. 2 and 3) forms an are over the face of the lower, central portion 27 of the block; and the ends of the springs are turned downwardly into the respective notches 24 to contact the inside surfaces of the strips 25. An adjustment screw 28 passes freely through a hole in the center of the spring 26 and is threaded into the portion 27 of the block. As the screw is turned inwardly, the strips 25 press with increasing force outwardly against respective sides of the weather strip 14. The sliding, supporting block and its rotor are fabricated from a moderately resilient material such as nylon.

The rotary locking member 13 has, in addition to the cylindrical bearing portion 23 that'fits into the hole 22 of the block 12, a coaxial locking portion 39 that is generally cylindrical with a diameter between its cylindrical surfaces 29 being greater than that of the bearing portion 23 such that the periphery of the locking portion when it is rotated to its position for locking extends beyond the sides of the block 12. Also, the diameter between the cylindrical surfaces 29 is somewhat greater than the normal inside dimension between the sides 30 (FIG. 7) of the channel of the weather strip 14 in which the sliding, window-supporting assembly 11 is mounted. Diametrically opposite portions 3! and 32 (FIGS. 2 and 3) of the cylindrical surfaces 29 have been cut off such that the diameter of the locking portion 39 between the cutoff portions 31 and 32 is short enough to provide a freely sliding fit of the locking portion 39 between the sides 30 (FIG. 7) of the weather strip 14. As shown in FIGS. 2 and 5, a rectangular hole 33 for receiving an end of the pivot pin 17 (FIG. 1) of the sash extends axially through the cylindrical locking portion 39 partway through the cylindrical portion 23 of the rotary locking member 13. Whereas one of the cutoff portions at the point 31 of the locking portion is a flat surface, the portion at the opposite point 32 has been formed into a notch between the periphery of the locking portion and one of the shorter ends of the rectangular hole 33. As described below, the notch at the point 32 allows passage of the end of the pivot pin 17 while the sash 16 is horizontal for removal of the sash. The locking portion 39, as shown in FIGS. 2, 4, and 5, has a pair of arcuate cutout portions 34 spaced coaxially inwardly from respective .cylindrical surfaces 29 to allow compression of the locking portion when a moderately strong or excessive force is applied thereacross. The position of the rotary locking member 13 within the weather strip 14 while the sash 16 is in a normal vertical position is shown in FIGS. 6 and 7. The pin 17 (FIG. 1) is generally T-shapecl in that it has a rectangular head 35 that enters the rectangular hole 33 of the rotary locking member 13. Normally, the head 35 of the pin is positioned with its longer sides horizontal for positioning the rotary locking member 13 such that its cutoff portions at points 31 and 32 are adjacent the respective sides 30 of the weather strip 14. The sliding supporting block 12 is therefore not restrained by fric tion between it and the weather strip 14 except for a desired controlled amount of friction determined by the adjustment of the screw 28. The screw 28 is tightened sufficiently to prevent movement of the sash 16 by the difference in upward force applied by the balancing spring 15 and the downward force due to the weight of the sash 16.

With reference to FIG. 6, the longitudinal slot 36 in the center of that side of the weather strip 14 adjacent to the sash 16 is wide enough to allow passage of the rectangular end 35 of the pin 17 when the sash 16 is horizontal and the longer sides of the rectangular end 35 are vertical, but it is narrow enough to capture the rectangular end 35 when the sash is vertical and the longer 'sides of the rectangular end are horizontal. Therefore, the sash 16 cannot be accidentally removed from this opening while it is vertical even if the rectangular end 35 of one or both of the pins 17 are not positioned in the hole 33 of the rotary locking member 13. In FIG. 7, ridges 37 and 38 along respective sides of the slot 36 of the weather strip are positioned within a central longitudinal groove of the vertical edge of the sash 16 to retain the sash in its vertical position. The surface of the weather strip 14 just outside the ridges 37 and 38 contact the adjacent outer edges of the sash 16 to provide a weather seal.

The position of the rotary locking member 13 to lock the sliding, window-supporting assembly 11 while the sash 16 is horizontal is shown in FIGS. 8 and 9. While the sash 16 is rotated from the vertical to a horizontal position, the rectangular end 35 of the pivot pin 17 is rotated until its longer dimension is vertical, and the outer end of the slot at the cutoff point 32 of the locking portion 39 has its outer end facing upwardly. The locking action is provided by the cylindrical surfaces 29 of the locking portion 39 forcing the sides 30 of the weather strip 14 outwardly to cause small portions of opposite sides of the strip to follow the curve of the cylindrical surfaces 29. The locking action commences when the sash is rotated about 30 degrees from vertical. As the sash 16 is rotated, the ridges 37 and 38 are forced outside the groove that is in the edge of the sash 16, and the weather strip 14 is forced farther into the groove 19 of the jamb 20 so as to withdraw the pin 17 from the hole 33 far enough to be moved into the notch at the point 32. Since the longer sides of the rectangular end 35 of the pin 17 and the notch in the locking portion 39 are aligned with the slot 36 in the weather strip while the sash is horizontal, the sash 16 can then be removed by moving the bottom of the sash upwardly and then cocking the sash somewhat sideways in the frame.

I claim:

1. A sliding, window-supporting assembly for supporting in a window frame a sash that can be tilted and removed, a weather strip and a sash balancing spring attached to the inner surface of each jamb of said window frame, each of said weather strips being generally rectangular in cross section and at least the sides of said weather strip perpendicular to said jamb being resilient such that they can be deformed by moderate force, the side of each of said weather strips farthest from its jamb having a central, longitudinal slot and the portion of the weather strip adjacent the slot contacting said sash; the window-supporting assembly comprising:

a sliding supporting block contained between said resilient sides of each of said weather strips, the upper end of each of said sliding supporting blocks being attached to a respective one of said balancing springs, a generally cylindrical rotary locking member rotatably mounted in each of said sliding supporting blocks, each of said rotary locking members having an axially located hole aligned with said slot of the respective weather strip, a pivot pin protruding outwardly from each side of said sash, the axis of said pins being on the same horizontal line, the outer ends of each of said pins being inserted in said hole of a respective one of said rotary locking members, the pivot pins being keyed in said holes to cause said rotary locking members to be rotated in said sliding supporting block in response to rotation of said sash about said pins,

each of said rotary locking members having a generally cylindrical locking surface with diameterically opposite cutoff portions and leaving diametrically opposite locking surfaces, said cutoff portions normally being adjacent respective ones of said resilient sides of said respective weather strip to provide a sliding fit of said sliding supporting block while said sash is in a normal vertical position, the diameter of said cylindrical locking surfaces being somewhat greater than the normal inside dimension between said resilient sides of said weather strip, said rotary locking member rotatable by said pivot pin in response to rotation of said sash from a vertical position to a horizontal position such that said cylindrical locking surfaces press outwardly on said resilient sides to cause deformation of the sides thereabout and thereby lock said respective supporting block to prevent its movement by a respective one of said balancing springs.

2. A sliding, window-supporting assembly as claimed in claim 1 wherein said hole in each of said rotary locking members and said outer end of each of said pivot pins are oblong in cross section, the longer dimension being vertical while said sash is horizontal, said rotary locking member having a notch extending in the direction of said longer dimension from said oblong hole to one of said cutoff portions thereof, the outer end of each of said pivot pins when rotated so that its longer cross section dimension is aligned vertically adapted to pass through a respective one of said slots of said weather strip, and through a respective one of said notches while it is aligned vertically into said oblong hole of said respective rotary locking member, said oblong outer end of each of said pins having its longer cross-sectional dimension greater than the width of said slot of said weather strip such that it is held captive within said weather strip while said sash is rotated substantially from its vertical position.

3. A sliding, window-supporting assembly as claimed in claim 2 wherein said rotary locking member is plastic with moderate resiliency and has arcuate sections cut out between said keying hole and said cylindrical locking surfaces to provide compression between said locking surfaces in response to application of excessive inward force.

4. A sliding, window-supporting assembly as claimed in claim 1 having in each of said sliding supporting blocks a spring tension adjustment to provide a desired constant amount of frictional resistance between said sliding support-ing block and said resilient sides of said respective weather strip, each of said sliding supporting blocks being made of moderately resilient plastic with a rectangular portion extending below said rotary locking member, said lower extending member having a pair of parallel slots, each spaced a short distance from each side of said lower extending portion to form a pair of opposite narrow strips along the sides thereof, said spring tension adjustment comprising a flat spring curved over the surface of said lower extending portion that faces said slot of said weather strip, the ends of said spring being turned into respective ones of said slots within said lower portion and an adjustment screw passing perpendicularly through the center of said flat spring into said lower portion.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4068406 *Aug 19, 1976Jan 17, 1978Jim Walter CorporationSide camming balance spring lock
US4079549 *Aug 26, 1976Mar 21, 1978Jim Walter CorporationBalance spring lock for tilt out sash
US4227345 *Jan 26, 1979Oct 14, 1980Durham Jr Robert CTilt-lock slide for window sash
US4364199 *Jul 11, 1980Dec 21, 1982The Celotex CorporationRemovable-tilt-out window construction
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Classifications
U.S. Classification49/181, 49/446, 49/453
International ClassificationE05C17/00, E05C17/64
Cooperative ClassificationE05D13/08
European ClassificationE05D13/08