Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3789841 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 5, 1974
Filing dateSep 15, 1971
Priority dateSep 15, 1971
Publication numberUS 3789841 A, US 3789841A, US-A-3789841, US3789841 A, US3789841A
InventorsAntoshkiw W
Original AssigneeBecton Dickinson Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Disposable guide wire
US 3789841 A
Abstract
A stainless steel core wire has a tapered portion at one end and a portion of uniform thickness at another end. A Teflon jacket encloses the portion having uniform thickness to form a proximal end and a flexible stainless steel spring encloses the tapered portion forming a distal end. The spring is secured at both ends to the stainless steel core wire.
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Antoshkiw 45 F b, 5 1974 DISPOSABLE GUIDE WIRE 3,547,103 12/1970 Cook 128/205 R Inventor: William T. Antoshkiw y, NJ 3,612,058 10/1971 Ackerman 128/348 [73] Assignee: Becton, Dickinson 8!. Company, East Primary Examiner-Lucie H. Laudenslager Rutherford, NJ. Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Kane, Dalsimer, Kane, Sul- 22 Filed: Sept. 15, 1971 and [2]] Appl. No.: 180,810 57 ABSTRACT A stainless steel core wire has a tapered portion at one [52] U.S. Cl ..128/2.05 R end and a portion of uniform thickness at another end. [51] Int. Cl A61b 5/02 A Teflon jacket encloses the portion having uniform [58] Field of Search... 128/205 R, DIG. 9, 341, 348 thickness to form a proximal end and a flexible stainv less steel spring encloses the tapered portion forming a [56] References Cited distal end. The spring is secured at both ends to the UNITED STATES PATENTS stainless steel core wire. 3,452,740 7/1969 Muller 128/DIG. 9 UX 10 Claims, 2 Drawing Figures DISPOSABLE GUIDE WIRE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention This invention relates to guide wires for vascular manipulations and more particularly to a disposable guide wire having added strength in the proximal portion and flexibility in the distal portion.

2. Description of the Prior Art The requirements for diagnostic studies of the vascular systems of the human body have increased considerably in recent years with the marked advances in the cardiac and vascular surgery. This increased requirement has led to extensive use of cardiac and vascular catheters that must be inserted over a relatively long distance into internal sites in the body. Extensive manipulation is required to maneuver a relatively long catheter into branch vessels that extend at sharp angles relative to the feeding direction of the catheter.

The most common catherization procedure is the percutaneous technique described in 1953 by Sven Ivar Seldinger. In the practice of this catherization procedure, an area of the skin is antiseptically prepared and a local anthestic is applied after which a nick is made in the skin over the site of a vessel to be catherized. An arterial needle assembly, (inner needle, stylet) is then introduced into the vessel and its introduction is indicated by a back flow of blood to the inner needle. The inner needle is then withdrawn and replaced with a guide wire which is then introduced through the cannula for a distance of approximately 6 to 10 inches. External pressure is then applied to hold the guide wire in place while the cannula is withdrawn after which the guide wire is fed into the vessel to the selected area by fluoroscopy or some other similar technique. Considerable manipulation is required of the guide line to direct it to the desired area. Once the guide wire reaches the selected area, the catheter is passed over the guide wire to the selected area after which the guide wire is withdrawn from the catheter.

Heretofore, guide wires were formed of closely wound stainless steel forming a continuous coil spring having an inner bore which is sealed at the distal end with arounded cap or tip. Usually an inner core wire is placed within the coil bore, said wire terminating a short distance from the distal tip to provide flexibility at the distal tip and rigidity throughout the remainder of the wire. In most cases, the proximal portion having the core wire was too rigid while the distal tip was so flexible it was practically uncontrollable.

In order to overcome the problems of the devices of the prior art, U. S. Pat. No. 3,528,406 taught the use of two core wires, one extending to the distal tip and the other terminating a distance therefrom. Another embodiment taught by the previously mentioned patent included a heavy gauge core wire throughout the proximal portion, the heavy gauge wire being reduced to a uniform thinner diameter at the distal tip portion to provide greater flexibility.

All the devices heretofore provided had a coil spring extending throughout their entire length and were therefore subject to coil breakage or breakage of the core wire. The coil spring and the core wire were not usually in contact and therefore did not provide mutual support for each other. The coil spring did not provide for good torque transmission because the spring would tend to bend and turn rather than transmit torque from the proximal portion to the distal tip of the guide wire. This feature made manipulation more difficult and time consuming.

The coil spring also had many other disadvantages, one being the high friction presented between the coils of the spring and the inner surface of the vessel. The spring coils tended to collect blood and were more difflcult to clean causing clot formation on the coils. The spring also presented an electrical hazard during cardiovascular catheterization.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention contemplates a flexible guide wire for use in vascular manipulations. The guide wire is disposable and comprises a stainless steel core wire having a portion of uniform diameter and a tapered portion. The uniform diameter portion is coated with a plastic jacket to form a proximal portion and the tapered portion is enclosed in a stainless steel coil spring to form a distal portion. The spring is fixed at both ends to the inner core by soldering, the solder at the end forming a rounded distal tip.

The stainless steel spring closing the distal portion provides the required flexibility and resiliency while permitting introduction of the guide wire through a stainless steel cannula without the danger of skiving during introduction of the wire. The danger of spring coil breakage is greatly reduced by reducing the spring length and by connecting it to the inner core at both ends. The tapered core wire at the distal portion provides for uniform increase in flexibility between the proximal portion and the distal tip.

The use of the plastic jacket around the proximal portion of the center of core wire provides several advantages. The use of the plastic jacket reduces the length of spring coil required and thereby greatly reduces the cost of the guide wire. Stainless steel spring material is the most expensive component of the guide wire and elimination of substantial length of spring material greatly reduces the cost. The plastic material provides a smooth low friction surface and thereby facilitates the movement of the guide wire through a vessel. The plastic jacket is easier to clean than the spring coil and prevents clotting between the coils of the spring. The plastic jacket is in direct contact with the inner core wire and therefore supports the wire and reduces the possibility of wire breakage while also providing for excellent torque transmission to the distal portion to facilitate manipulation of the guide wire. Use of an insulated plastic jacket eliminates the electrical hazard which was present during cardiovascular catheterization when devices of the prior art were used.

The primary objective of the present invention is to provide a disposable guide wire that need not be cleaned and sterilized after each use.

Another objective of the present invention is to provide a guide wire having better manipulative characteristics than guide wires heretofore provided.

Another objective of the present invention is to provide a guide wire having a low coefficient of friction and good torque transmitting ability.

Another objective of the present invention is to provide a guide wire that prevents clot formation.

Another objective of the present invention is to provide a guide wire that is not prone to breakage.

The foregoing objectives and advantages of the invention will appear more fully hereinafter from a consideration of the detailed description which follows, taken together with the accompanying drawing wherein one embodiment of the invention is illustrated by way of example. It is to be expressly understood, however, that the drawing is for illustrative purposes only and is not to be considered as defining the limits of the invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a plan view of a flexible guide wire constructed in accordance with the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a sectional view taken along lines 22 of FIG. 1.

DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION Referring to the drawings, there is shown a stainless steel wire having a portion 12 of uniform thickness and a tapered portion 14. Portion 12 is covered by a jacket 16 made of a plastic material such as Teflon which has a smooth low friction outer surface. The plastic coated portion 12 forms a proximal portion of a guide wire.

A stainless steel coil spring 18 extends over tapered portion 14 and is soldered or otherwise connected to wire 10 at a point indicated by numeral 20 which is adjacent the end of jacket 16. Spring 18 also connected by soldering or otherwise to the end of the tapered portion 14 to form a distal tip 22 having a rounded outer surface.

The outer diameters of spring 18 and jacket 16 are substantially equal and vary from 0.021 to 0.047 of an inch. However, other diameters are contemplated and must be considered to be within the teachings of the present invention.

The guide wire may be manufactured from standard plastic coated stainless steel wire cut to any desired length such as 120 centimeters after which the plastic coating is stripped from the distal portion. The distal portion is then tapered by either a grinding procedure or by the application of a tension force to neck down the distal portion. The stainless steel spring is then positioned over the distal portion and soldered to the stainless steel core wire to form the disposable guide wire.

The flexible guide wire may be used following the standard techniques taught by Seldinger and as previously explained in the background of the invention. The distal portion has a rounded tip 22 and an increased amount of flexibility provided by the tapered core wire 14 while the proximal portion has a greater degree of rigidity provided by the uniform diameter of the core wire and the plastic jacket 16. The plastic jacket provides a smooth surface with a low coefficient of friction to facilitate insertion of the guide wire into a vessel while the Teflon jacket provides for excellent torque transmission making the guide wire exceptionally maneuverable.

The use of a plastic jacket eliminates the need for the coil spring to extend over the entire length of the guide wire and thus reduces the amount of spring material it required. The cost of the guide wire is substantially reduced as a result of the reduced amount of extensive stainless steel spring material required for the guide wire. Likewise, the tendency towards clot formation is greatly reduced by the smooth surface of the plastic jacket. The possibility of core wire breakage is greatly reduced by the use of the plastic jacket which is in contact with the proximal portion of the core wire and provides reinforcement. The tendency towards spring coil breakage is also reduced by the use of a shorter spring than in those devices heretofore provided. The plastic jacket also provides an additional advantage in that it eliminates the electrical hazard associated with devices of the prior art during cardiovascular catheterization.

It is to be understood that the teachings of the invention are not strictly limited to the materials recited above, but that other compatible materials may be used which are familiar to those skilled in the art.

What is claimed is:

1. A flexible guide wire, comprising:

an elongated inner core wire having a proximal portion and a distal portion;

a coil spring enclosing the distal portion and fixably attached thereto the coil spring including a proximal end and distal end; and

a plastic jacket enclosing and engaging the proximal portion the jacket including a proximal end and a distal end, the jacket distal end terminating at the coil spring proximal end and being substantially equal in diameter to the coil spring such that the jacket forms an extension of the coil spring.

2. A guide wire as described in claim 1, wherein the proximal portion is of uniform diameter.

3. A guide wire as described in claim 1, wherein the coil spring is attached to the inner core wire at both ends of the distal portion.

4. A guide wire as described in claim 1, wherein the inner core wire is made of stainless steel.

5. A guide wire as described in claim 1, wherein the coil spring is made of stainless steel.

6. A flexible guide wire, comprising:

an elongated inner core wire having a proximal portion and a tapered distal portion;

a coil spring enclosing the distal portion and fixably attached thereto; and

a plastic jacket enclosing and engaging the proximal portion.

7. A flexible guide wire, comprising:

an elongated inner core wire having a proximal portion and a distal portion the proximal portion of the inner core wire being of uniform diameter and the distal portion is tapered;

a coil spring enclosing the distal portion and fixably attached thereto; and

a plastic jacket enclosing and engaging the proximal portion.

8. A guide wire as described in claim 7, wherein the coil spring is attached to the inner core wire at both ends of the distal portion.

9. A guide wire as described in claim 8, wherein the inner core wire and the coil spring are formed of stainless steel.

10. A guide wire as described in claim 9, wherein the coil spring is attached to the inner core wire by soldering and the solder forms a distal tip at one end of the coil spring.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3452740 *May 31, 1966Jul 1, 1969Us Catheter & Instr CorpSpring guide manipulator
US3547103 *Oct 29, 1965Dec 15, 1970William A CookCoil spring guide
US3612058 *Apr 17, 1968Oct 12, 1971Electro Catheter CorpCatheter stylets
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4003369 *Apr 22, 1975Jan 18, 1977Medrad, Inc.Angiographic guidewire with safety core wire
US4080706 *Nov 4, 1976Mar 28, 1978Medrad, Inc.Method of manufacturing catheter guidewire
US4402307 *Oct 31, 1980Sep 6, 1983Datascope Corp.Balloon catheter with rotatable energy storing support member
US4456017 *Nov 22, 1982Jun 26, 1984Cordis CorporationCoil spring guide with deflectable tip
US4538622 *Nov 10, 1983Sep 3, 1985Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Guide wire for catheters
US4545390 *Sep 22, 1982Oct 8, 1985C. R. Bard, Inc.Steerable guide wire for balloon dilatation procedure
US4548206 *Jul 21, 1983Oct 22, 1985Cook, IncorporatedCatheter wire guide with movable mandril
US4554929 *Jul 13, 1983Nov 26, 1985Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Catheter guide wire with short spring tip and method of using the same
US4721117 *Apr 25, 1986Jan 26, 1988Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Torsionally stabilized guide wire with outer jacket
US4732163 *Nov 10, 1986Mar 22, 1988Sarcem S.A.Remote controlled guide for a catheter
US4757827 *Feb 17, 1987Jul 19, 1988Versaflex Delivery Systems Inc.Steerable guidewire with deflectable tip
US4811743 *Apr 21, 1987Mar 14, 1989Cordis CorporationCatheter guidewire
US4813434 *Mar 31, 1988Mar 21, 1989Medtronic Versaflex, Inc.Steerable guidewire with deflectable tip
US4815478 *Mar 31, 1988Mar 28, 1989Medtronic Versaflex, Inc.Steerable guidewire with deflectable tip
US4830023 *Nov 27, 1987May 16, 1989Medi-Tech, IncorporatedMedical guidewire
US4867173 *Jun 30, 1986Sep 19, 1989Meadox Surgimed A/SSteerable guidewire
US4867174 *Nov 18, 1987Sep 19, 1989Baxter Travenol Laboratories, Inc.Guidewire for medical use
US4873983 *Jan 27, 1988Oct 17, 1989Advanced Biomedical Devices, Inc.Steerable guidewire for vascular system
US4884579 *Apr 18, 1988Dec 5, 1989Target TherapeuticsCatheter guide wire
US4922924 *Apr 27, 1989May 8, 1990C. R. Bard, Inc.Catheter guidewire with varying radiopacity
US4925445 *Feb 9, 1989May 15, 1990Fuji Terumo Co., Ltd.Elastic metallic alloy
US4934380 *Nov 23, 1988Jun 19, 1990Boston Scientific CorporationMedical guidewire
US4971490 *Sep 19, 1989Nov 20, 1990National Standard CompanyFlexible guide wire with improved mounting arrangement for coil spring tip
US4976690 *Mar 22, 1990Dec 11, 1990Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Variable stiffness angioplasty catheter
US4984581 *Oct 12, 1988Jan 15, 1991Flexmedics CorporationFlexible guide having two-way shape memory alloy
US4991588 *Nov 13, 1989Feb 12, 1991Pfizer Hospital Products Group, Inc.Doppler guide wire
US5003918 *Dec 28, 1989Apr 2, 1991Interventional Technologies, Inc.Apparatus for manufacturing atherectomy torque tubes
US5054501 *May 16, 1990Oct 8, 1991Brigham & Women's HospitalSteerable guide wire for cannulation of tubular or vascular organs
US5059176 *Dec 21, 1989Oct 22, 1991Winters R EdwardVascular system steerable guidewire with inflatable balloon
US5067489 *Oct 26, 1990Nov 26, 1991Flexmedics CorporationFlexible guide with safety tip
US5095915 *Mar 19, 1990Mar 17, 1992Target TherapeuticsUse with catheter
US5102390 *May 2, 1985Apr 7, 1992C. R. Bard, Inc.Microdilatation probe and system for performing angioplasty in highly stenosed blood vessels
US5111829 *Jan 18, 1991May 12, 1992Boston Scientific CorporationSteerable highly elongated guidewire
US5147317 *Jun 4, 1990Sep 15, 1992C.R. Bard, Inc.Low friction varied radiopacity guidewire
US5171383 *Sep 16, 1991Dec 15, 1992Terumo Kabushiki KaishaTreating elastic alloy so flexibility is sequentially ! increased
US5176149 *Dec 27, 1991Jan 5, 1993Nivarox-Far S.A.Catheter guide support
US5190546 *Apr 9, 1991Mar 2, 1993Raychem CorporationMedical devices incorporating SIM alloy elements
US5207229 *Oct 1, 1990May 4, 1993Advanced Biomedical Devices, Inc.Flexibility steerable guidewire with inflatable balloon
US5234003 *Feb 20, 1992Aug 10, 1993Cook IncorporatedFlexible tip wire guide
US5238004 *Sep 30, 1992Aug 24, 1993Boston Scientific CorporationSuperelastic alloy
US5243988 *Aug 7, 1992Sep 14, 1993Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Intravascular imaging apparatus and methods for use and manufacture
US5243996 *Jan 3, 1992Sep 14, 1993Cook, IncorporatedSmall-diameter superelastic wire guide
US5287858 *Sep 23, 1992Feb 22, 1994Pilot Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Rotational atherectomy guidewire
US5295493 *Nov 10, 1992Mar 22, 1994Interventional Technologies, Inc.Anatomical guide wire
US5313967 *Jul 24, 1992May 24, 1994Medtronic, Inc.Torque transmitting medical guidewire
US5333620 *Sep 8, 1993Aug 2, 1994C. R. Bard, Inc.High performance plastic coated medical guidewire
US5345945 *Dec 25, 1993Sep 13, 1994Baxter International Inc.Dual coil guidewire with radiopaque distal tip
US5353798 *Feb 21, 1992Oct 11, 1994Scimed Life Systems, IncorporatedIntravascular imaging apparatus and methods for use and manufacture
US5368035 *Sep 17, 1992Nov 29, 1994Boston Scientific CorporationUltrasound imaging guidewire
US5377690 *Feb 9, 1993Jan 3, 1995C. R. Bard, Inc.Guidewire with round forming wire
US5396902 *May 28, 1993Mar 14, 1995Medtronic, Inc.Steerable stylet and manipulative handle assembly
US5402799 *Jun 29, 1993Apr 4, 1995Cordis CorporationFor use with a medical device catheter
US5409015 *May 11, 1993Apr 25, 1995Target Therapeutics, Inc.Deformable tip super elastic guidewire
US5415170 *Aug 27, 1993May 16, 1995Pilot Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Rotational atherectomy guidewire
US5438997 *Jun 8, 1992Aug 8, 1995Sieben; WayneIntravascular imaging apparatus and methods for use and manufacture
US5443443 *Aug 17, 1993Aug 22, 1995Surgical Systems & Instruments, Inc.Atherectomy system
US5488959 *Dec 27, 1993Feb 6, 1996Cordis CorporationMedical guidewire and welding process
US5498250 *May 18, 1994Mar 12, 1996Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Catheter guide wire with multiple radiopacity
US5546948 *Nov 28, 1994Aug 20, 1996Boston Scientific CorporationUltrasound imaging guidewire
US5551444 *May 31, 1995Sep 3, 1996Radius Medical Technologies, Inc.Flexible guidewire with radiopaque outer coil and non-radiopaque inner coil
US5596996 *Mar 30, 1995Jan 28, 1997Medtronic, Inc.High support nitinol tube guidewire with plastic plug transition
US5597378 *Oct 2, 1992Jan 28, 1997Raychem CorporationMedical devices incorporating SIM alloy elements
US5599492 *Dec 16, 1994Feb 4, 1997Target Therapeutics, Inc.Method for making a guidewire with a flexible distal tip
US5636642 *Apr 25, 1995Jun 10, 1997Target Therapeutics, Inc.Deformable tip super elastic guidewire
US5662119 *Apr 21, 1995Sep 2, 1997Medtronic Inc.Steerable stylet and manipulative handle assembly
US5664580 *Jan 31, 1995Sep 9, 1997Microvena CorporationGuidewire having bimetallic coil
US5673707 *Sep 23, 1994Oct 7, 1997Boston Scientific CorporationEnhanced performance guidewire
US5682894 *Apr 26, 1996Nov 4, 1997Orr; Gregory C.Guide wire
US5746701 *Sep 14, 1995May 5, 1998Medtronic, Inc.Guidewire with non-tapered tip
US5749837 *Aug 1, 1996May 12, 1998Target Therapeutics, Inc.Enhanced lubricity guidewire
US5769796 *Jan 22, 1997Jun 23, 1998Target Therapeutics, Inc.Super-elastic composite guidewire
US5772609 *Jun 28, 1996Jun 30, 1998Target Therapeutics, Inc.Guidewire with variable flexibility due to polymeric coatings
US5827201 *Jul 26, 1996Oct 27, 1998Target Therapeutics, Inc.Elongated flexible wire core, coil covering, tubular super-elastic alloy braid, polymeric layer; surgical device
US5830155 *Oct 27, 1995Nov 3, 1998Cordis CorporationGuidewire assembly
US5836892 *Oct 30, 1995Nov 17, 1998Cordis CorporationGuidewire with radiopaque markers
US5851206 *Jun 30, 1995Dec 22, 1998The Regents Of The University Of CaliforniaMethod and apparatus for endovascular thermal thrombosis and thermal cancer treatment
US5865768 *Sep 30, 1996Feb 2, 1999Medtronic, Inc.Guide wire
US5873842 *Jun 26, 1997Feb 23, 1999Medtronic, Inc.Steerable stylet and manipulative handle assembly
US5916178 *May 5, 1997Jun 29, 1999Medtronic, Inc.For use in a catheter
US5919187 *Sep 15, 1995Jul 6, 1999The Regents Of The University Of CaliforniaMethod and apparatus for endovascular thermal thrombosis and thermal cancer treatment
US5925059 *Dec 21, 1994Jul 20, 1999Target Therapeutics, Inc.Detachable embolic coil assembly
US5951568 *Mar 19, 1998Sep 14, 1999Schatz; Richard A.Over the wire single operator catheter with wire stabilizer
US5957865 *Sep 25, 1997Sep 28, 1999Merit Medical Systems, Inc.Flexible catheter guidewire
US6099485 *Jun 3, 1997Aug 8, 2000C. R. Bard, Inc.Torquable, low mass medical guidewire
US6099546 *Jan 13, 1997Aug 8, 2000Target Therapeutics, Inc.Detachable embolic coil assembly using interlocking hooks and slots
US6139510 *May 11, 1994Oct 31, 2000Target Therapeutics Inc.An elongated, flexible alloy wire core coated with a lubricious polymeric material and a tie layer disposed between; a surgical device for use in a catheter, accessing a targeted site in a lumen system
US6306141Jun 7, 1995Oct 23, 2001Medtronic, Inc.Medical devices incorporating SIM alloy elements
US6488637Apr 30, 1996Dec 3, 2002Target Therapeutics, Inc.Composite endovascular guidewire
US6673025Nov 16, 1999Jan 6, 2004Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Polymer coated guidewire
US6755794 *Apr 25, 2001Jun 29, 2004Synovis Life Technologies, Inc.Adjustable stylet
US7455646Jun 26, 2007Nov 25, 2008Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Polymer coated guide wire
US7494474Jul 31, 2003Feb 24, 2009Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Polymer coated guidewire
US7540845Sep 5, 2003Jun 2, 2009Boston Scientific Scimed, IncMedical device coil
US7763077Dec 24, 2003Jul 27, 2010Biomerix CorporationRepair of spinal annular defects and annulo-nucleoplasty regeneration
US7803395May 17, 2004Sep 28, 2010Biomerix CorporationBiodurable, reticulated elastomeric matrices that are resiliently-compressible; crosslinked polycarbonate-urea-urethane, open-cell foam; tissue engineering; biodurable scaffolds; biocompatible; grafting; orthopedics; tissue repair and regeneration long-term
US7833175Sep 5, 2003Nov 16, 2010Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Medical device coil
US7883474Apr 30, 1996Feb 8, 2011Target Therapeutics, Inc.Composite braided guidewire
US7892186Dec 9, 2005Feb 22, 2011Heraeus Materials S.A.Handle and articulator system and method
US8118827Mar 14, 2003Feb 21, 2012Cordis CorporationTotal occlusion guidewire device
US8241230Sep 25, 2007Aug 14, 2012Cook Medical Technologies LlcVariable stiffness wire guide
US8308658Apr 13, 2007Nov 13, 2012Neometrics, Inc.Medical guidewire
US8428747Jun 25, 2004Apr 23, 2013The Spectranetics Corp.Lead locking device and method
US8556926Nov 16, 2011Oct 15, 2013Cordis CorporationTotal occlusion guidewire device
US20060271067 *May 24, 2005Nov 30, 2006C.R. Bard, Inc.Laser-resistant surgical devices
USRE33911 *Mar 27, 1986May 5, 1992Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Catheter guide wire with short spring tip and method of using the same
USRE34695 *Oct 29, 1992Aug 16, 1994Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Torsionally stabilized guide wire with outer jacket
USRE36628 *Oct 16, 1997Mar 28, 2000Terumo Kabushiki KaishaMethod of manufacturing a differentially heat treated catheter guide wire
USRE37117Jul 7, 1997Mar 27, 2001Target Therapeutics, Inc.Detachable embolic coil assembly using interlocking clasps and method of use
USRE42625Mar 15, 2006Aug 16, 2011The Regents Of The University Of CaliforniaEndovascular electrolytically detachable wire and tip for the formation of thrombus in arteries, veins, aneurysms, vascular malformations and arteriovenous fistulas
USRE42662Mar 15, 2006Aug 30, 2011The Regents Of The University Of CaliforniaEndovascular electrolytically detachable wire and tip for the formation of thrombus in arteries, veins, aneurysms, vascular malformations and arteriovenous fistulas
USRE42756Mar 15, 2006Sep 27, 2011The Regents Of The University Of CaliforniaEndovascular electrolytically detachable wire and tip for the formation of thrombus in arteries, veins, aneurysms, vascular malformations and arteriovenous fistulas
DE3334174A1 *Sep 21, 1983Mar 22, 1984Bard Inc C RLenkbarer fuehrungsdraht fuer die ballondilatation
DE3528876A1 *Aug 12, 1985Feb 19, 1987Schubert WernerGuiding wire
DE19607595C2 *Feb 29, 1996Jan 20, 2000Epflex Feinwerktech GmbhFührungsdrahtkern, insbesondere für ein chirurgisches Instrument
EP0014424A1 *Jan 29, 1980Aug 20, 1980Toray Monofilament Company LimitedMedical vascular guide wire and self-guiding type catheter
EP0157862A1 *Oct 4, 1984Oct 16, 1985Maerz Peter DrGuiding mandrel for catheter and similar instruments and manufacturing process thereof.
EP0200430A1 *Apr 17, 1986Nov 5, 1986Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Torsional guide wire with attenuated diameter
EP0200919A1 *Apr 2, 1986Nov 12, 1986ANGIOMED AktiengesellschaftGuide wire
EP0223179A2 *Nov 10, 1986May 27, 1987Sarcem SaRemotely controlled catheter guide
EP0340304A1 *Dec 25, 1987Nov 8, 1989Terumo Kabushiki KaishaGuide wire for catheters and method of manufacturing same
EP0820782A2Jul 10, 1997Jan 28, 1998Target Therapeutics, Inc.Micro-braided catheter guidewire
EP0914803A1Jan 3, 1991May 12, 1999The Regents Of The University Of CaliforniaEndovascular electrolytically detachable guidewire tip
EP1005837A2Sep 30, 1992Jun 7, 2000The Regents Of The University Of CaliforniaEndovascular electrolytically detachable wire for thrombus formation
EP1287846A2Apr 4, 1997Mar 5, 2003Target Therapeutics, Inc.Composite endovascular guidewire
EP1323385A2Sep 30, 1992Jul 2, 2003The Regents of The University of CaliforniaEndovascular electrolytically detachable wire for thrombus formation
EP1329196A1Jan 3, 1991Jul 23, 2003The Regents of the University of CaliforniaEndovascular electrolytically detachable guidewire tip
WO1989006985A1 *Jan 27, 1989Aug 10, 1989Advanced Biomedical Devices InSteerable guidewire for vascular system
WO1989010088A1 *Apr 14, 1989Nov 2, 1989Target Therapeutics IncCatheter guide wire
WO1991017698A1 *May 15, 1991Nov 17, 1991Brigham & Womens HospitalSteerable guide wire for tubular cannulation
WO1992008501A1 *Oct 3, 1991May 29, 1992Medtronic IncFixed wire catheter and unitary guidewire
WO2010078544A1Jan 4, 2010Jul 8, 2010Vance Products Incorporated D/B/A Cook Urological IncorporatedMedical guide wire and method of forming thereof
Classifications
U.S. Classification600/585
International ClassificationA61B5/02, A61M25/09
Cooperative ClassificationA61M2025/09083, A61M25/09033
European ClassificationA61M25/09B2