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Publication numberUS3790073 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 5, 1974
Filing dateApr 28, 1972
Priority dateApr 28, 1972
Publication numberUS 3790073 A, US 3790073A, US-A-3790073, US3790073 A, US3790073A
InventorsR Martin, C Pittman
Original AssigneeLectra Data Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Voting machine
US 3790073 A
Images(12)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Martin et al.

Feb. 5, 1974 VOTING MACHINE [75] Inventors: Roy A. Martin; Clarence E. Pittman,

both of Atlanta, Ga.

[73] Assignees Lectra Data, Inc., Atlanta, Ga.

[22] Filed: Apr. 28, 1972 21 Appl. No.; 248,657

' Related U.S. Application Data [62] Division of Ser'. No. 755,688, Aug. 27-, 1968,

Primary Examiner-Stephen- .l. Tomsky Attorney, Agent, or F irm-Newton, Ormsby Hopkins &

[ ABSTRACT Apparatus for selectively producing electrical pulses representative of a particular selection made by the operator of the apparatus. The apparatus is disclosed in the form of a voting machine built up of modular components which fit together to form any of a plurality of different voting arrangements. The voting machine is substantially tamper-proof and has the following basic components: an input module, a frame assembly, a first control module, a first vote module, a second control module, a second vote module, a terminal module, a write-in module, a slave input module, and a third control module. The modules may be placed together in selected fashion to define a voting machine for voting in any type of political race and which will prevent overvoting. Thedifferent modules fit together in such manner that they cannot be separated without a key to unlock the same, thereby reducing the possibility of tampering with the election results. Moreover, each module is constructed in such manner that the module may be checked prior to assembly of the voting machine to insure proper functioning of the module once it is assembled.

5 Claims, 25 Drawing Figures PATENTEBFEB V 3.790.073

SHEET UZUF 12 PAFENIEDFEB 51914 I 3.790.073

' sum 050F12 PAIENTEU FEB 74 sum as or 1 2 PATENTED FEB 51974 SHEET 07 0F 12 PATENTED FEB 5 4 SHEET OSUF 12 MJ W H PAFENIE FEB 5:914 3.790 073 sum 100$ 1 SHEET 120F12 NR T PAF'ENFEDFEB 51974 75 TQM $9M.

, VOTING MACHINE This is a division, of application Ser. No. 755,688, filed on Aug. 27, 1968 now abandoned.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention This invention relates generally to apparatus for producing electrical pulses representative of a particular selection made on the apparatus and more particularly to a built-up type voting machine having modular components which fit together to define the complete machine.

2. Discussion of the Prior Art There are basically two types of voting machines on the market today. One of these types is the mechanical voting machine such as that manufactured by the Automatic Voting Machine Company of Jamestown, New York and another type is the vote recorder using a computer input card as that manufactured by the l.B.M. Corporation of Armonk, New York.

One of the major problems with the mechanical type voting machine is its very high initial cost. Also, the mechanical type voting machine is extremely heavy and requires extensive preventive maintenance to insure that the voting machine operates properly. Moreover, the mechanical type votingmachine requires storage in a controlled environment to prevent corrosion of the voting machines during storage. The construction of the mechanical type voting machine allows tampering to change the results of the election. Moreover, set-up for these mechines is very time-consuming and requires a skilled technician.

While the vote recorder type voting machine does not require extensive maintenance or storage in a controlled environment, the results of the election can be very easily changed by placing certain objects in the vote recorder to change the position of the computer card therein as it is being punched. Moreover, the requirement that the computer card be carried to a centralized location to be run through the tabulating computer greatly increases the likelihood of the election results being changed by tampering. While the initial cost of the vote recorder, itself, is relatively low, the cost of a computer to total the results indicated by the computer cards from the vote recorder" is very expensive. Moreover, set-up for the election books for use in these recorders is very time-consuming. The time required for correcting errors is prohibitive and the necessity of repunching the computer cards that do not initially run in the computer introduces a high risk of election fraud.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION These and other problems associated with prior art voting machines are overcome by the invention dis-- closed herein in that the construction of the modules used to make up the voting machine is such that the assembled voting machine'cannot be tampered with to change the election results. Moreover, the use of a minimum number of different types of modules to make up the machine greatly reduces the overall cost of the voting machine-The use of modules to make up the machine allows the machine size to be varied in accordance with the size of the election so that the machine size is kept to a minimum. The modules are electrically connected together so that not only is over-voting prevented, but the results indicated by the machine may be 2 fed to a central location for recording the votes automatically from the precincts. Furthermore, by electrically connecting the modules, the various components may be selectively located remotely of the machine proper, resulting in the best possible machine layout and the most effective use of each component.

Therefore, it is one of the objects of the invention to provide a voting machine which is accurate, and which prevents varying of the election results by tampering with the machine.

Another object of the invention is to provide a voting machine which may actuate local and remote computer devices for recording the votes.

Another object of the invention is to provide a voting machine which is inexpensive to manufacture, durable in structure, and efficient in operation.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a voting machine that has few moving parts and which requires substantially no maintenance.

Another object of the invention is to provide a voting machine made up of modular components of minimum cost so that any one of the modular components may be discarded when it functions improperly.

Another object of the invention is to provide a voting machine which can be serviced by inexperienced personnel.

Another object of the invention is to'provide a voting machine which lends itself to an infinite variety of arrangements for different sizes and types of elections.

Another object of the invention is to provide a voting machine which is not limited to a predetermined number of issues which can be presented.

Another object of the invention is to provide a voting machine which may be readily and easily operated.

Another object of the invention is to provide a voting selection of a candidate or issue and verification of the actual recording thereof.

Another object of the invention is to provide a voting machine which includes a supervisory indication to the poll worker that voting has taken place.

Another object of the invention is to provide a voting machine which, when the votes are to be counted, permits simultaneous observation of the counters by a number of people for verification of the total number of votes recorded for each candidate or issue.

Another object of the invention is to provide a voting machine which requires little space for storage and which is corrosion-free.

Another object of the invention is to provide a voting machine which may be electrically connected to a central location to provide signals thereto for recording the vote at this central location.

Another object of the invention is to provide a voting machine which is complete in itself and which can be BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a front elevational view of an assembled voting machine; I

FIG. 2 is a side elevational view of the voting machine shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of one of the control modules of the invention;

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of a vote module of the invention;

FIG. 5 is a side elevational view of the vote module shown in FIG. 4 showing the plug connection therefor;

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of the write-in vote mod ule of the invention;

FIG. 7 is a comprising: cross-sectional view of two modules showing how the vote recording counters are reset;

FIG. 8 is a bottom view of the write-in module with portions thereof removed to show the internal components thereof;

FIG. 9 is a cross-sectional view taken along line 9-9 in FIG. 8;

FIG. 10 is a cross-sectional view taken along line 10l0 in FIG. 8;

FIG. 11 is an enlarged partial perspective view showing the construction of the cover door of the write-in module; I

FIG. 12 is an electrical schematic diagram for the input module of the invention;

FIG. 13 is an electrical schematic diagram for the party control module of the invention;

FIG. 14 is an electrical schematic diagram for the party vote module of the invention;

FIG. 15 is an electrical schematic diagram for the write-in vote module of the invention;

FIG. 16 is an electrical schematic diagram for the individual control module of the invention;

FIG. 17 is an electrical schematic diagram for the individual vote module of the invention;

FIG. 18 is an electrical schematic diagram for the terminal module of the invention;

FIG. 19 is an electrical schematic diagram for the slave input module of the invention;

FIG. 20 is an electrical schematic diagram for the multiple control module of the invention;

FIG. 21 is an electrical schematic diagram for part of an assembled voting machine;

FIG. 22 is an electrical schematic diagram for the rest of the assembled voting machine'of FIG. 21.

FIG. 23 is a partial elevational view of a second embodiment of the lockout means to prevent overvoting;

FIG. 24 is a cross-sectional view of the lockout means shown in FIG. 23; and

FIG. 25 is an electrical schematic diagram showing the multiple control module in use.

These figures and the following detailed description disclose specific embodiments of the invention; however, the inventive concept is not limited thereto since it may be embodied in other forms.

DESCRIPTION OF ILLUSTRATIVE EMBODIMENTS Referring in detail to. the figures of the drawings, it

will be seen that the apparatus of the invention illustrated is a built-up structure using an assembly of different types of modules, blocks or closures which fit together to form the completed voting machine. It is to be understood, however, that, while one particular arrangement of modules is depicted in the drawings, the voting machine may have a variety of arrangements to suit the particular requirements of a particular plebiscite.

In the embodiment chosen for illustrating our invention, the major components include a plurality of modules M, a power supply PS, and the support frame assembly .I. There are, however, basically nine different types of modules M associated with the machine, these being an input module 10, a' party control module 11, a party vote module 12, individual control module 14, an individual vote module 15, a write-in vote module 16, a terminal module 18, a slave input module 19 and a multiple control module 20. The modules M are illustrated assembled to form a general election section designated by the letters GES and an independent election section designated by the letters IES.

The supply module 10 properly connects the other modules to the power supply PS to operate the same. In the disclosed embodiment of the-machine, the module 10 also provides the total vote pulse producing function for the machine, the reset function of the machine, and the correct function of the machine. There is one module 10 associated with each voting machine.

The party control module 11 controls the lockout function for all of the vote modules 12, 15 and 18 in the general election section GES. It renders the select portions of themodules 12, 15 and 18 inoperative when one of the vote modules 12 is energized It does not, however, have any effect on the-vote modules 15 and 18 in the independent election section IES. There'will be one party control module 11 associated with each general election section GES.

The party vote module 12 controls the select function for one party in the general election section GES. There will be one module 12 for each party in the general election. The module'l2 also controls the ground return path for the control modules 11 and 14in the general election section GES to carry out the lockout function.

An individual control module 14 is associated with each individual race in both the general election section GES and the independent election section IES. The modules 14 control the lockout function for each political race. They render the select portion of those' modules 15 and 18 in that particular race inoperative to prevent overvoting. When the module 14 is used in the general election section GES, it also controls the ground return path for the party control module 11 to carry out the lockout function.

An individual vote module 15 is associated with each candidate in each political race in both the general election section GES and the independent election section IES. Each module 15 controls the ground return path of its associated individual control module 14 for that political race to carry out the lockout function thereof.

A write-in vote module 18 is associated with each political race in which write-in votes are expected. Each module .18 performs a select function and controls the ground return path as does the modules 15. In addition, each module 18 provides an internally carried write-in ballot for the voter to write in his vote. It is also understood that a write-in vote module 18 may be provided for write-in party voting in the party grouping of the general election section GES.

A terminal module 16 is associated at the end of each general election section GES and at the end of each unit of the voting machine carried by the frame assembly J. The modules 16 provide ground 'retum paths for the modules 11-16 between it and the input module as well as a transfer of the total vote pulse producing function, the reset function, and the correction function to the other modules 14-16 in that unit of'th e voting machine carried by each frame assembly J.

The slave input module 19 allows a voting machine to be made up of several units, each unit being carried by a separate frame assembly J. This makes provision for the voting machine to be expanded to encompass any size election while controlling the election with one input module 10. The slave input module 19 is placed in the same position in each of the additional units of the voting machine as is the input module 10in the first unit of the machine. It is connected to the module 10 directly or indirectly through other modules 19 and transfers the total vote pulse producing function, the reset function, and the correct function from the module 10 to the modules 11-18 in that unit associated with the slave input module 19.

The multiple control module 20 makes provision for voting for more than one candidate in a political race such as is usually the case for county commissioners. The multiple control module 20 is placed between the control module 14 and the vote modules 15 and 18 in the multiple vote race. The module serves to bypass the lockout function of its associated modules, 14, 15 and 16 until the voter has selected the prescribed number of candidates in that particular race. In the embodiment of the invention illustrated, the vote counter for each party or candidate is carried in the particular vote module 12, 15 or 18 associated with that candidate. Until the voter makes his selection, none of the counters are connected to ground or to the hot wire. When the select switch of a module 12, 15 or 18 is depressed by the voter to select the candidate for which he wants to vote, the associated counter is connected to ground. When the input module 10 is actuated to perform the. vote pulse producing function, it connects all of the counters to a hot wire. This actuates these counters connected to ground to record the votes. In this manner, no voltage can be imposed across the counters until the vote lever is pulled.

While the vote lever to initiate the total vote producing function is located in the input module 10, it is understood that it may be remotely located and still operate properly. While the correct lever to initiate the correct function of the machine is located in the input module 10, it likewise may be remotely located and still operate properly. The vote counters are illustrated located in each vote module 12, 15 or 18; however, it is understood that these counters may be easily located remotely of the machine and still operateproperly simply by their connection to the pulse producing circuitry of the invention. Likewise, it is understood that a central computer vote counting station may be connected to the vote pulse producing circuitry'of the invention to cumulatively record the votes from several remote voting locations.

FRAME ASSEMBLY The frame assembly J supports the various modules 10-20 when they are assembled and presents them at a convenient height and angle for voting. The frame assmebly J includes a pair of spaced apart parallel support rods 21 which are generally-vertically oriented when the voting machine is in use. The upper ends of support rods 21 with the apertures 25 of one support rod 21 being aligned with the-apertures 25 in the other support rod 21. A locking pin 26 is selectively extendable through a passage 28 through the lower end cap 24 and through appropriate apertures 25 through the support rods 21' to affix theselective number of modules 10-20 between the end caps 22 and 24. An appropriate passage 29- is provided through one end of the locking pin 26 and a head 30 is provided on the other end of the locking pin 26 so that a conventional padlock P may be inserted through passage 28 to lock the pin 26 in position and prevent the disassembly of the voting machine until the padlock P is removed.

The frame assembly J also includes a support stand which may be mounted on a conventional table T and includes a support plate 31 defining appropriate passages 32 therethrough which receive the support rods 21 therethrough and position the voting machine at the desired angle. The height of the table T determines the vertical position of the voting machine when it is placed I on the support plate 31. Therefore, it will be seen that the modules 10-20 are selected to properly construct the voting machine for the desired numberof political races and are slidably positioned betweenthe support rods 21. After the desired number of modules 10-19 are placed between the support rods 21, the bottom 'end cap 24 is slipped thereon and the locking pin 26 is placed therethrough. The padlock P is placed through the passage 28 to lock the voting machine together. It will be seen that the apertures 25throu'gh the support pins 21 are so arranged'that the modules 10-20 will always be tightly locked between the end caps 22 and 24 and cannot be disassembled until the padlock is removed from the locking pin 26. in this manner, the voting machine can be assembled at one location, then transported to the polling station, and placed in the support plate 31 for the voting to take place. After the voting is completed, the voting machine is removed from the support plate 31 and taken to a central tabulating station so that the total vote may be tabulated from the counters indicating the vote on the voting machine.

Each of the illustrated modules 10-20 are of standard thin wall construction and are provided with a positioning lug L at each end thereof as best seen in FIGS. 1-6 which position the modules between the support rods 21 in a stacked relationship. It is understood that the modules 10-20 may be a molded unit with the components positioned therein prior to molding. This type construction is ideally suited for the modules since the 1 cost thereof is so low that a module can be discarded rather than repaired when it functions improperly. Also, the components may be first encapsulated and then placed in the module.

The fronts of modules 12 and 15 are provided with windows 23 which have spaces for candidate and party cards. Modules 11-15 and are provided with overhanging lips 27 whichclose the top of the window 23 of the next lower module when the machineis assembled to prevent the cards from being changed during the election or before disassembly.

INPUT MODULE The input module 10 controls the overall operation ofthe voting machine. It is connected to the power supply PS and to each of the other modules 11-18 and 20 through male and female plug connections A and B. The module 10 is best seen in FIGS. 1 and 2 and in the electrical schematic of FIGS. 12 and 21.

The illustrated input module 10 carries the vote lever 35 which causes the vote selected for each race to be recorded. A correct lever 36 is also provided which allows correction prior to the time vote lever 35 is pulled to record the votes.

Referring more particularly to FIGS. 12 and 21, the module 10 is connected to the power supply PS through terminals X, Y and Z. Common ground wire 40 is connected to terminal Y, and common hot wire 41 is connected to terminal, Z. A reset unit 42 which resets the voting machine for the next voter is connected to the module 10 through terminals Q, R, T and V. The module 10 is provided with a plug connection A with a number of connections designated 10-1 to 10-9.

Each side of each of the modules 11-18 and 20 is provided with corresponding plug connections, the female portion B located on one side and the male portion A on the opposite side. 'ln this manner the modules can be stacked between the guide rods 21 and connections made therebetween, Each connection of each module will be referenced by the module designation with a connection number suffix and a letter suffix to indicate male or female portion. For example, the first male portion of the module ll connection will be designated 11-1A. These connections mate with each other and with connections 10-1 to 10-9 of the module 10. The connections 1A and 1B are associated with the common ground wirefor the circuit and the connections 7A and 7B are associated with the common hot wire for the circuit. Connections 8A and SE a are associated with the vote pulse producing function of the circuit while connections 9A and 9B are associated with the reset and correct function of the circuit. Connections 2A and 2B, 3A and 38, 4A and 4B, 5A and 5B, and 6A and 6B serve as ground controls for the select portions of the circuit and are therefore associated with the lockout function of the circuit to prevent overvotmg.

Common hot wire 41 is connected to hot wire 44 which is in turn connected to the connection 10-7. Common ground wire 40 is connected directly to connection 10-1. Wire 45 connects ground wire 40 with the voting circuit 46 and correct circuit 48. Vote circuit 46 is connected between wire 45 and wire 44 and comprises the normally closed contacts R1-1, the coil RC2 of relay R2 and the vote pushbutton switch PB-l in series. Therefore, it will be seen that closing switch PB-l energizes coil RC2. Correct circuit 48 is connected between secondaryground wire 49 and wire 45, the wire 49 being connected to connection 10-9. Correct circuit 48 includes correct pushbutton switch PB-2 and normally closed contacts R2-2 of relay R2 in series with each other and in parallel with normally open contacts R1-2. Therefore, it will be seen that closing switch PB-l or contacts R1-2 will connect wire 49 to common ground wire 40. 1f relay R2 is energized, switch PB-2 becomes ineffective. Connecting secondary ground wire 49 to common groundwire 40 resets all of the modules 10-16 and 18..

Secondary hot wire 50 is connected to connection 10-8 and to hot wire 44 through normally open contacts R2-1 of relay R2. Therefore, it will be seen that wire 50 will have a voltage applied thereto when relay R2 is energized by closing switch PB-l or the vote switch. Tl-lis serves to activate the vote countersassociated with each of the activated vote modules 12, 15

. and 16, as will be explained hereinafter, to record votes for the selected candidates. Coil RC2-of relay R2 is maintained energized after switch PB-1 is opened by wire 51 which connects one side of coil RC2 with secondary hot wire 50. Coil RC2 is de-energized when contacts R1-1 are opened by energizing relay'Rl.

Coil RC1 of relay R1 is connected between hot wire 41 and ground wire 45 through connection Q, reset pushbutton switch PB-3 of reset unit 42, and connection R. Therefore, it-will be seen that closing switch PB-3 willclosecontacts Rl-2 to connect wire 49 to ground and open contacts Rl-l to de-energize relay R2 and reset the machine.

Reset unit also includes an indicator light L1 connected between ground wire 45 and secondary hot wire 50 through connection R and connection V. Thus, whenvoltage is applied to. wire 50, light 1.1 will beilluminated to indicate to the poll worker that voting has taken place. When switch PB-3 is closed by the poll worker, voltage is removed from wire 50 because contacts R2-l are opened and light L1 goes out.

To indicate the total number of people who have voted on the voting machine and for verifying the vote cards kept by the poll worker, a counter O1 is provided in the input module 10. The counter 01 is electrically operated and is connected between ground wire 40 and secondary hot wire 50. Therefore, when switch PB-l is closed, counter C-l will beactivated to record that one person has voted. The counter C-1 will be covered until the voting machine is transported to the central tabulating station as will be explained hereinafter.

Connection 10-2 is connected to ground wire 40 for connection with the individual control module 14 as described hereinafter. Connections I through V are provided for connection to the slave input module 19. Connection 1 is connected to secondary hot wire 50, connection 11 is connected with secondary ground wire 49, connection III is connected to hot wire 44 and connection 1V is connected to common ground wire 40 through wire 45. In this manner, more than one stack of modules 11-18 may be controlled by'the control module as will be explained hereinafter.

PARTY CONTROL MODULE The party control module 11 controls the party vote modules 12 connected thereto and is best seen in FIGS. 3, '4 and 13. The module 11 includes a ready light L2 which indicates when the party vote section is ready to operate, a reset relay R3 and an operational relay R4 which controls overvoting in the party and individual candidate voting sections.

Ground connection 11-1A is connected directly to connection ll-lB through wire 54 and wire 54 is connected to connection 11-213. Wire 54 is also connected to control connection 11-5B through normally closed contacts R3-2 of relay R3 and to connection l1-6B through normally open contacts R3-1 of relay R3 and wire 52. Wire 52 is also connected to control connection 11-4B through normally open contacts R4-1 of relay R4.

Hot connection 11-7A is connected directly to connection 11-7B through wire 55 and secondary hot connection 11-8A is connected directly to connection 11- 88. Secondary ground connection 11-9A is connected directly to connection 1l-9B through wire 56. Coil RC3 of relay R3 is connected between wire 56 and 55 and coil RC4 of relay R4 is connected between wires 55 and 52. Light L2 is connected across coil RC4 in parallel therewith.

When coil RC3 is momentarily energized, contacts R3-l are closed and contacts R3-2 are opened. This connects coil RC4 to ground and disconnects the counters of the modules 12 from ground so that coil RC4 will be energized and held in that condition for the modules 12 to operate as will beexplained. It will also be seen that relay R3 isenergized both to reset the machine and to correct the machine prior to the time the vote lever 35 is pulled. This feature will be more fully explained in the operation section.

PARTY VOTE MODULE The party vote module 12 is best seen in FIGS. 5 and 14. It includes a select pushbutton switch PB-4 for selecting a particular party in the election, there being one module 12 for each party in the race. When the switch PB-4 is momentarily closed, a'counter C-2 associated with the module 12 will be connected for activation when vote lever 35 is pulled and a select-light L3 will be illuminated. I

Referring specifically to FIG. 14, ground connection 12-1A is connected directly to connection 12-1B, control connection l2-2A is connected to connection 12-2B through normally closed contacts R6-2 and control connection 12-4A is connected directly to connection 12-4B." Control connection 12-5A is connected to connection 12.-5B through wire 58 and control connection l2-6A is connected to connection 12-6B through wire 60. Hot connection 12-7A is connected to connection 12-7B through wire 59. Secondary hot connection l2-8A is connected to connection l2-8B. through wire 61, and secondary ground connection 12-9A is connected directly to connection 12-9B.

Coil RC5 of relay R5 is connected between wires 59 and 60 in series with select pushbutton switch PB-4. Relay R5 serves to initiate the connection of the counter to ground.

Counter C-2 is connected to wire 61 and to normally open contacts R6-1 of relay R6 through wire 62 and contacts R6-1 are in turn connected to wire 58 through wire 64. Wire 65 connectes one side of coil RC6 of relay R6 to wire 59 and wire 66 connects the other side of coil RC6 to normally open contacts RS-l of relay R5. Contacts R5-1 are in turn connected to wire 64. Wire 68 connects wires 66 and 62 and select light L3 is connected between wires 65 and 62. Relay R6 serves to hold counter C-2 connected to ground until deenergized when the machine is reset.

The party vote module 12 always follows a party control module 11 or another vote module 12 which is in turn connected to the party control module 11. In this manner wire 59 will always be connected directly to common hot wire4l, wire 61 will always be connected directly to secondary hot wire 50. Wire 58 will be connected to common ground wire 40 through normally R3-2. Energizing relay R6 opens contacts R6-2 and closes contacts R6-1 associated with the energized relay R6. Closing contacts R6-l maintains coil RC6 and counter C-2 connected to ground wire 40 through contacts R3-2. Opening contacts 'R6-2 interrupts the ground path for wire 60 and relays R5 so that relay R5 is not only de-energized, but cannot be re-energized when switch PB-S is closed. This condition is maintained until relay R3 is energized to open contacts R3-2 and interrupt the ground path of relay R6 and counter C-2.

INDIVIDUAL CONTROL MODULE The individual control module 14 is similar in design to the control module 11 as seen in FIG. 1, 2 and 16 and controls the individual candidate or issue section of the voting machine. It is provided with a ready light L4 to indicate when the individual voting section is operational and includes a reset relay R8 for resetting or correcting the individual vote section. An operational relay R7 is also provided for maintaining the individual vote section operational.

Referring more specifically to FIG. 16, ground connection l4-1A is connected to connection 14-18 by wire 69 while control connection 14-2A is connected to connection 14-23 by wire 70. Control connection 145-3A is connected to wire 70 and control connection 14-4A is connected to connection 14-4B through normally open contacts R7-1 of relay R7. Wire 71 connects normally open contacts R8-1 with wire 69 and wire 72 connects contacts R7-1 with connection 14-68. Wire 71 is connected to connection 14-5B through normally closed contacts R8-2 and wire 72 is connected to connection 14-3B through normally open contacts R7-2 of relay R7.

Wire 74 connects hot connection 14-7A with connection l4-7B, secondary hot connection 14-8A is connected directly to connection 14-88, and wire 75 connects secondary ground connection 14-9A with connection 14-9B. Coil RC8 of relay R8 is connected between wires 72 and 74. Ready light L4 is connected across coil RC7 in parallel therewith.

Relay R8 performs the same function as relay R3 when wire 75 is momentarily connected to ground by closing contacts R8-1 and opening contacts R8-2. This connects coil RC7 to ground and disconnects the counters of the vote modules 15 associated therewith from ground. This energizes relay R7 and holds it in that condition for the module 15 associated therewith to operate as will be further explained in the operation section.

INDIVIDUAL VOTE MODULE The individual vote module 15, as best seen in FIGS. 1, 2 and 17, is similar in construction to the vote module 12 and is provided with a select pushbutton switch PB-5 for selecting a particular candidate or issue. A plurality of modules 15 are connected to the control module 14 and operate in a manner similar to the party vote section. There is one module 15 for each candidate and issue in the election.

As seen in FIG. 17, ground connection 15-1A is connected directly to connection 15-1B, control connection 15-2A is connected directly to connection 15-2B, control connection 15-4A is connected directly to connection 15-4B, and secondary ground connection 15-9A is connected directly to connection l5-9B. Control connection l5-3A is connected to connection 15-3B through normally closed contacts Rl-2 of relay R10, and wire 76 connects control connection 15-5A with connection l-5B. Control connection -6A is connected to connection l5-6B by wire 78, wire 79 connects hot connection 157A with connection l5-7B and secondary hot, connection l5-8A is connected to connection l5-8B by wire 80.

Coil RC9 is connected between wires 78 and 79 in series with select pushbutton switch PB-S. One side of vote counter O3 is connected to wire 80 and the other side of counter C-3 is connected to normally open contacts R10-1 of relay R10 by wire 81. Normally open contacts RIO-1 are in turn connected to wire 76 by wire 82. One side of coil RC10 of relay R10 is connected to wire 79 by wire 84 and the other side thereof is connected to normally open contacts R9-l of relay R9 by wire 85. The contacts R9-1 are also connected to wire 82. Wire 85 is connected to wire 81 by wire 86 and lamp L5 is connected between wires 84 and 81. Relay R9 serves to initiate the connection of the counter G3 to ground and relay R6 serves to hold counter C-3 connected to ground until deenergized when the machine is reset. When a voltage is imposed on wire 80, those counter C-3 will record one vote for the selected candidate or issue.

WRITE-IN VOTE MODULE The write-in vote mdoule 16 is best seen in FIGS. 6, 8-11, and 15. It presents a section of blank paper tape 90 to the voter if he decides to write in his vote. The tape 90 ishidden by a cover door 91 until the vote lever 35 is pulled. The tape. 90 is carried within a cartridge 150 by a driven spool 92 and an idler spool 94 with the driven spool 92. A tape and door release mechanism 98 releases the tape 90 and opens the door 91 so that a predetermined amount of blank tape 90 is presented to the voter. The door 91 is closed by a closure mechanism 99 when the voting machine is reset. Therefore,

' The tape 90. shown is a paper tape commercially availthe tape is presented for voting and then stored internally in the machine.

Referring more specifically to FIGS. 8- 1 1, the module 16 includes a housing 100 defining an opening 101 in the front wall thereof. An opening 102 is provided in the rear wall of the housing 100 for the insertion therethrough of the cartridge 150 which carries the spools 92 and 94 and the tape 90. When the cartridge 150 is fully seated in the housing 100, a locking pin 151 is passed through the side wall 103 andlug 104 of the housing 100 i and through appropriate apertures through the cartridge 150 to lock the same in the housing 100. A padlock P is passed through the end of the pin 151 and a lug 96 affixed to the housing 100 to keep the cartridge 150 in place until the votes are ready to be counted.

The spools 92 and 94 are rotatably mounted in the cartridge 150 and the idler spool 94 is equipped with a resistance device of conventional design to maintain a tension on the tape 90 as it is transferred from the spool 94 to the spool 92. A support table 152 is provided in the forward end of the cartridge 150. The tape 90 passes over the table 152 as it passes from the spool 94 to the spool 92. When theca rtridge 150 is in position in the housing 100, the support table 152 presents the tape 90 directly behind the opening 101 for the voter to write thereon. Idler rolls 154 direct the tape 90 over the table 152 and between spools 92 and 94.

A hysteresis electric motor carried by the housing is drivingly connected to the spool 92, when the cartridge is in position, by a gearing arrangement 105. The motor 95 is constantly energized but the movement of the tape 90 is intermittently stopped by a check pin 155.

The check pin 155 is slidably carried by one of the side walls of the cartridge 150 adjacent the tape 90 as it passes from the spool 94 to the spool 92. The pin 155 has a projection 156 which engages one of a series of pre-punched holes 158 (FIG. 10).through the tape 90 when the pin 155 is pressed toward the tape 90. The holes 158 are punched a predetermined distance apart so that a blank piece of the tape 90 will be presented over the table 152 each time the pin 155 releases the tape 90 and re-engages the next hole 158.. A leaf spring 159 constantly urges the pin'155 away from the-tape 90 and a release mechanism 98 intermittently urges the pin 155 towardthe tape 90 to arrest the movement thereof.

The tape 90 may be of any of a number of materials.

able on the market today and has sufficient strength to prevent it from tearing when the projection 156 engages the holes 158. i

The release mechanism 98 is carried by the housing 100 adjacent the pin 155 when the cartridge 150 is in position. A bell-crank 111 connected to a solenoid SOL-1 urges the pin l55 toward the tape 90 in its normal unenergized position. When the solenoid SOL-1 is energized, the plunger 112 thereof is retracted to release pin 155 and allow spring 159 to move projection 156 out of hole 158. This permits the tape 90 to advance. Solenoid SOL-1 is only'momentarily' energized so that pin 155 will again be urged toward tape 90 and projection 156 will engage the next hole 158 to arrest movement of tape 90. A blank piece of tape 90 is now positioned under opening 101. A cam 110 on the bell crank 11 1 allows the cartridge 150 to be inserted in the housing 100 without interference with pin 156.

At the same time the tape 90 is released, the mechanism 98 also releases the cover door 91 so that it may be opened for the write-in vote. The door 91 is pivoted to the housing 100 at 114 and is provided with a catch lug 115 which extends into the housing 100 through slot 116 when the door 91 is closed. A bolt assembly 118 carried within the housing 100 engages the catch lug 115 and holds the door closed.

The bolt assembly 118 includes a bolt 119 slidably carriedwithin the housing and arranged for extension into a passage 120 through the lug 115 when the door is closed. The bolt 119 is urged by spring 117 toward the lug 115 and both the bolt and lug are complementarily beveled to cause the bolt 119 to retract as the door 91 is closed and then extend into the passage 120 when the door is fully closed. This locks the door in a closed position.

An extension 121 affixed to the bolt 119 is engaged by the bell crank 111 as the plunger 112 is retracted to retract the bolt 119. This allows the door 91 to open and expose the tape 90 under the opening 101. As soon as solenoid SOL-1 is de-energized, the bolt 119 is returned to its extended position by spring 117.

The assembly 99 opens and closes the door 91 once it is unlatched. The assembly 99 includes a solenoid SOL-Zwhich has its plunger 122 pinned-to arm 124 attached to door 91. The solenoid SOL-2 is pivotally mounted in housing 100 so-that extension of plunger 122 opens door 91 and retraction thereof closes door 91.

In its normal de-energized position, the plunger 122 is urged toward extension. Therefore, when the door9l isunlatched, it is automatically opened. When solenoid SOL-2 is energized, plunger 122 is retracted and the door 91 closed. Since the bolt 119 is extended when the door 91 is closed, the door will be latched in its closed position.

As will be further explained in the operation section, the solenoid SOL-l will be energized'when vote lever 35 is pulled to open door 91. Solenoid SOL-2 will be enrgized when reset switch PB-3 is closed to close door 91.

Referringm'ore particularly to FIG. 15, ground connection 18-1A is connected to connection l8-1B by wire 125, control connection 18-5A is connected to connection 18-5B by wire 126, and wire 128 connects control connection l8-6A with connection 18-6B. Wire 129 connects hot connection 18-7A with connection 18-713, secondary hot connection 1 8-8A is connected to connection 18-8B by wire 130, and wire 131 connects secondary ground connection 18-9A with connection 18-9B. Control connection 18-2A is connected directly to-connection 18-28, control connection 18-4A is connected directly to connection 18-4B, and control connection 18-3A is connected to connection l8-3B through normally closed contacts R12-2 of relay R12.

The motor 95 is connected between wires 129 and 125. Coil RCll of relay R11 is connected between wires 128 and 129 in series with select pushbutton switch PB-6 for selecting a write-in vote to be made. One side of counter O4 is connected to wire 130 while wire 135 connects the other side of counter O4 to normally open contacts R12-l of relay R12. Wire 136 connects contacts R12-l to wire 126. Wire 132 connects 15. Moreover, the motor is constantly energized as will be further explained hereinafter.

Solenoid SOL-1 is connected between wires and 1 135 and solenoid SOL-2 is connected between wires 130 and 131. When counter C-4 is energized, solenoid SOL-1 will also be energized to open the door 91. When the machine is reset, solenoid DOL-2 is energized to close the door 91 as set forth in the operation section.

TERMINAL MODULE The terminal module 18 is best seen in FIGS. 1, 2 and 18 and is placed at the end of each unit carried by the frame assembly J as well as between a general election section GES and an independentelection section IES. The terminal module 18 serves two functions: first, it provides a ground return path for the lockout and selection portions of the modules associated therewith and secondly, transfers the vote pulse producing function, the correction function, and the reset function to those modules following it.

As best seen in FIG. 18, ground connection l8-1A is connected to connection 18-1B, hot connection 18-7A to connection 18-7B, secondary hot connection l8-8A to connection 18-8B, and secondary ground connec tion 18-9A to connection 18-9B. Controlconnection 18-23 is also connected to ground connections 18-1A and 18-1B. Control connections 18-2A, 18-3A and 18-4A are all connected to each other.

SLAVE NPUT MODULE The slave input module 19 as best seen in FIG. '19 has the same type housing as the terminal module 18. It is used when several module stacks carried by different frame .assemblies are necessary for each voting machine and serves to transfer the functions of the input module 10 so that one vote lever 35 and correct lever 36 control the entire machine. The module 19 is placed in the same position in the stack as the module 10.

Module 19 is provided with connections IA-VA which correspond to connections I-V of the input module 10. These corresponding connections are connected to each other via a coaxial cable (not shown) so that the functions of the module 10 will be transferred to that stack of modules associated with the slave module 19.

Module 19 is also provided with connections'IB-VB which are connected to corresponding connections IA-VA so that other modules 19 may be connected thereto. This allows further expansion of the voting machine.

The module 19 is also provided with connections 19-1 through 19-9 which correspond to connections 10-1 through 10-9 of module 10. Connection IVA is connected to connections l9-1 and 19-2, connection IIIA to connection 19-7, connection 11A to connection 19-9 and IA to connection 19-8. This causes the mod-

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6964372 *Jul 29, 2003Nov 15, 2005Peterson William MConference-table-based wired information system
US7857200 *Oct 9, 2007Dec 28, 2010William RouverolSave democracy election system
Classifications
U.S. Classification235/54.00F
International ClassificationG07C13/00
Cooperative ClassificationG07C13/00
European ClassificationG07C13/00