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Publication numberUS3790149 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 5, 1974
Filing dateApr 26, 1971
Priority dateApr 26, 1971
Also published asDE2131138A1, DE2131138B2, DE2131138C3
Publication numberUS 3790149 A, US 3790149A, US-A-3790149, US3790149 A, US3790149A
InventorsL Crosby
Original AssigneeMorley Furniture Spring Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Spring construction
US 3790149 A
Abstract
Attachment apparatus for joining sinuous spring bands to the frame rails in furniture or the like. Anchor link members and radius link members are employed, alone or in combination with each other, to connect the free ends, either plain or Zee-hooked, to the rail at or below the rail top. The link members are color-coded according to length and stocked in a multi-compartment working container having corresponding color-coded compartments. Any desired length link or combination of links are readily selected by color reference.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 7 91 Crosby [451 Feb. 5, 1974 SPRING CDNSTRUCTION [75] Inventor: Lawton H. Crosby, Lake Bluff, Ill.

[73] Assignee: Morley Furniture Spring Corporation, Chicago, Ill.

[22] Filed: Apr. 26, 1971 [21] Appl. No.: 137,563

[52] U.S. Cl. 267/110 [51] Int. Cl F16f 1/46 {58] Field of Search... 267/110, 103, 107, 108, 104; 29/407 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,334,887 8/1967 Slominski 267/110 1,738,710 12/1929 Jones 29/407 2,735,165 2/1956 Soref et al. 29/407 3,272,497 9/1966 Valdelievre 267/110 3/1970 Rathbun 267/103 6/1962 Staples 267/107 Primary Examiner-James B. Marbert Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Hume, Clement, Brinks,

' William, Old & Cook, Ltd.

[5 7] ABSTRACT Attachment apparatus for joining sinuous spring bands to the frame rails in furniture or the like. Anchor link members and radius link members are employed, alone or in combination with each other, to connect the free ends, either plain or Zoe-hooked, to the rail at or below the rail top. The link members are colorcoded according to length and stocked in a multicompartment working container having corresponding color-coded compartments. Any desired length link or combination of links are readily selected by color reference.

36 Claims, 20 Drawing Figures PATENTEDFEB 51914 3.790;.149

SHEEI 1 BF 5 m/l mma SPRING CONSTRUCTION BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates in general to furniture and other seating arrangements and, more particularly, to seating arrangements of the sinuous spring band type. It deals specifically with apparatus and a method for mounting sinuous spring bands in furniture seat frames and the like.

A number of different types and shapes of devices, nailed or stapled to the front and back rails of a seat frome, are presently employed in the furniture industry for attaching sinuous spring bands to the frame. For

some in situ examples of these devices, attention is directed to several of the applicants earlier patents, U. S. Pat. No. 3,210,064, US. Pat. No. 3,311,366, U. S. Pat. No. 3,388,904 and U. S. Pat. No. 3,525,514, for example.

1 Most of the known devices necessitate attachment of the spring band to the top of the back or front rail in question; this notwithstanding the fact that it would be highly advantageous to be able to attach spring bands simply and economically at heights on the rails other than at or near the top to adapt to various furniture styles, accommodate different cushion thicknesses, and establish comfortable seat heights, for example. Several make-shift devices have been developed but none provide for simple and inexpensive as well as versatile attachment either below the rail top or on the rail top and, except for assemblies using relatively expensive helical springs calling for correspondingly expensive Z-hook ends on the spring bands, none provide for highly desirable articulate connection of the band to the frame.

Furthermore, the known devices and their mode of spring band attachment present a major problem to furniture manufacturers insofar as spring band inventory and cost are concerned. The very nature of these devices requires the manufacturer to stock a wide range of different lengths of sinuous spring bands; in effect, virtually one band length for each different frame size in order to obtain a uniform feel in seating throughout the manufacturers line of furniture.

In addition, with the spring band rail attachment devices presently in use, undesirable compromises must constantly be made between the spring cushion pitch, on one hand, and the band arc which bespeaks of softness, resilience or up-lift, and deepdrop coincidential with the prevention of bucketing or jack-knifing of the spring, on the other hand. Pitch control harmonious with luxurious, resilient seating, is an urgent need in the sinuous spring furniture.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION A primary object of the invention is to provide new and improved apparatus for mounting sinuous spring bands in furniture seat frames and the like. Another object is to provide apparatus which makes possible and practical the use of uniform length sinuous spring.

bands in furniture seats of relatively wide size range. Still another object is to provide apparatus which facilitates simple control of initial spring band suspension height, at either the front or back rails. Yet another object is to provide apparatus which permits precise control of the location or areas of maximum flexure in the spring band whereby deep-drop, luxurious seating is the result while necessary strong uplift is retained. A further object is to provide apparatus which permits selection of a wide range of seating characteristics, including softness, uplift, precise locating of this softness and uplift, cushion pitch and the like. Still a further object is to provide apparatus which eliminates cushion rail gap in a furniture seat arrangement. Another object is to provide a method of easily selecting a prescribed one or more of a series of varying length link members to assemble spring band mounting apparatus having specified dimensions.

The foregoing and other objects are realized in accord with the invention by providing a related family of attachment apparatus for joining sinuous spring bands to the rails of furniture frames or the like. The basic building blocks of this family of attachment apparatus are a series of link members which provide, either along or in combination with each other, a wide range of attachment capability in securing the free ends of sinuous spring bands to the rails.

Color-coding and storage of the link members in color-coded compartments according to the length facili tates easy selection of a desired length link or links to form an attachment apparatus of prescribed dimensions. Unused links are also easily and quickly returned to proper compartments by color reference. This method, for the first time, makes the use of numerous link sizes in a common assembly area practical; i.e., heretofore confusion and mixing of links was practi cally impossible to avoid.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS The invention, including its construction and method of operation, together with additional objects and ad vantages thereof, is illustrated more or less diagrammatically in the drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is an enlarged plan view of an anchor-radius link member embodying features of the present invention; v

FIG. 2 is a side elevational view of the link member illustrated in FIG. ll;

FIG. 3 is a side elevational view of a portion of a furniture spring assembly illustrating a first form of sinuous spring band attachment apparatus embodying features of the present invention, with parts broken away;

' FIG. 4 is an enlarged plan view of a portion of the spring assembly illustrated in FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is a side elevational view, similar to FIG. 3, illustrating an attachment apparatus embodying features of a second form of the invention;

FIG. 6 is an enlarged side elevational view of a portion of a furniture spring arrangement illustrating one modification of an attachment apparatus embodying features of a third form of the present invention, with parts broken away;

FIG. 7 is a plan view of the attachment apparatus illustrated in FIG. 6;

FIG. 8 is a side elevational view similar to FIG. 6, il lustrating another modification of the attachment apparatus embodying features of the third form of the invention;

FIG. 9 is an enlarged plan view of a modified form of anchor link member embodying features of the invention;

FIG. 10 is a side elevational view of the anchor link member illustrated in FIG. 9;

FIG. 11 is a plan view of a portion of a furniture spring assembly illustrating an attachment apparatus embodying features of a fourth form of the present invention;

FIG. 12 is aside elevational view of the attachment apparatus illustrated in FIG. 11;

FIG. 13 is a plan view of another modifiedform of anchor link member embodying features of the present invention;

FIG. 14 is a side elevational view of the link member illustrated in FIG. 13, incorporated in attachment apparatus embodying features of a fifth form of the present invention;

FIG. 15 is a side elevational view ofa modified radius link member embodying features of the present invention;

FIG. 16 is a side elevational view ofa portion of a furniture'spring assembly illustrating an attachment apparatus embodying features of a sixth form of the present invention;

FIG. 17 is a plan view of a portion of a furniture spring assembly illustrating an attachment apparatus embodying features ofa seventh form of the present invention;

FIG. 18 is a plan view of the anchor link member il lustrated in FIG. 17;

FIG. 19 is a plan view of a portion of a furniture spring assembly illustrating an attachment apparatus embodying an eighth form of the present invention; and

FIG. 20 is a side elevational view of the spring assembly illustrated in FIG. 19.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring now to the drawings, and particularly to FIGS. 1 and 2, a link member which comprises a basic building block of the family of apparatuses embodying features of the present invention is illustrated generally at 10. The link member 10 is fabricated of hard steel wire and is generally horse-shoe shaped in configuration. The two, opposite legs 11 of the link member are interconnected at the closed end of the link member by a base leg 12. Formed on the free end of each leg 11 is a half-loop retainer clip 14 in the shape of a shepherds crook.

As will hereinafter be explained, the dimensions and shape of the link member 10 are important to the invention. In this light, the member 10 at the base leg 12, between the opposed inner surfaces of the free legs 1 1, measures from l/l6ths inches to 1 inch. From this width, the free legs 11 converge toward each other so that at their free ends (the clips 14) the outside dimension across the legs 11 is l l/l6ths to l3/l6ths inches.

For reasons also hereinafter discussed, the link members are utilized in eight different lengths. In various apparatus embodying features of the invention, a link member would be selected from the following group:

Link member A 1 H16 inches in length Link member B l A inches in length Link member C 1 7/16 inches in length Link member D l /8 inches in length Link member E l l3/l6 inches in length Link member F 2 l/l6 inches in length Link member G 2 5/l6 inches in length Link member H 2 Va inches in length One other dimension of the link member 10 is signifcant to the invention. According to the invention, the open mouth 16 of the clip 14 on the link member 10, as seen in FIG. 2, is approximately 0.0070 inches narrower than the diameter of eight-gauge wire. In other words, the mouth 16 has a normal opening of 0.1550 i 0.003 inches. As hereinafter discussed, this dimensional relationship provides a snap-fit attachment to the end of a sinuous spring band on eight gauge or, where it is used, 8 k gauge wire.

Turning now to the various apparatus embodying features of the invention, attention is directed to FIGS. 3 and 4 where a furniture spring arrangement of the sinuous band type is illustrated generally at 110. The spring arrangement includes sinuous spring band attachment apparatus 111 embodying features of a first form of the present invention, mounting a sinuous spring band 112 between the front rail 113 and the back rail 114 of a conventional furniture frame (only part of which is shown) for a chair, sofa or vehicle or the like. Only one spring band 112 is illustrated but, as will be readily understood, the frame normally mounts a parallel series of these bands 112 on corresponding attachment apparatus 111.

The band 112 is a standard, regular loop, expanded loop, of super-loop sinuous wire spring comprising a series of parallel linear segments interconnected by a series of semi-circular segments 121. At the back end of the band 112, the free end of the last linear segment 1210 is bent toward the body of the band, as at 122, in the manner illustrated in FIG. 4. The last linear segment 121b on the front end of the back 112 is similarly bent.

In fabricating the assembly 110, the wooden back rail 114, for example, first has a pair of horizontally disposed, laterally spaced holes bored through it for each band 112 to be mounted. The holes in each pair of these holes, seen at 125 in FIGS. 3 and 4, are spaced apart a distance slightly greater than the l2/l6ths to l3/l6ths inches spacing of the free ends of the legs 11 on the link member 10; preferably 13/ l 6ths to 14/1 6ths inches. This spacing is less than the l5/l6ths to 1 inch spacing between the legs 11 at the base leg 12 end of the legs 1 1, however, The diameter of each of the holes 125 is approximately 7/l6ths inches.

With the holes 125 drilled in the rail 114 in the aforedescribed dimensions and positions, the legs 11 of the link member 10 are forced through adjacent holes 125 from the outside of the rail 114 to the inside, so that its clips 14 extend free of and face upwardly inside the rails. The spacing of the holes 125 is such that the legs 11 of the link member 10 must be sprung apart slightly to fit through the holes, but these legs are permitted to spring back once the link member is in place and the effect is that the link member legs 11 grip the rail between the holes 125. When the link member 10 is first inserted in place during assembly of the furniture seat, for example, this gripping action serves to retain the link member in place without preliminary stapling.

After the link member 10 has been mounted in the back rail 114 in this manner, an identical operation is performed on the front rail 113 (or visa versa). A spring band 112 of predetermined length is then seated with its forwardmost linear segment 121b seated over the clips 14 of the link member 10 mounted in the front rail 113, and its rearwardmost linear segment 121a connected to the link member mounted in the back rail 114 by another link member 10a.

The link member 10a is-identical in construction to the aforedescribed link member 10, but is employed somewhat differently. The link member 10a is turned over so that its open clips 14 face downwardly, in which position they are clipped over the rearwardmost end 1210 of the spring band 112. The base leg 12 of the clip 10a is, in turn, hooked into the upwardly facing clips 14 of the link member 10 seated in the base rail 14.

As seen in FIG. 4, the link member 10a is easily slipped over the upwardly facing clip 14 of the link member 11) because the converging legs 11 of the link member 10 have placed its clips 14 slightly less than l5/l6ths of an inch apart. The base leg 12 of the clip 10a is then seated into the clip 14 of the leg member 10.

In the same manner, the rearwardmost linear segment 121a of the sinuous spring band 112 is snapped into the downwardly facing clips 14 of the link member 10a. Because the mouth 16 of the clip 14 is slightly narrower than the diameter of the spring band wire segment 121a, the clips 14 expand as the segment 121a is snapped through the mouth 16, and then return to their normal configuration wherein the wire segment 121a is resiliently retained within the clips 14 of the link member 10. The legs 11 of. the leg member 10a also converge, or course, permitting the clips 14 of the link member 10a to seat upwardly over the last linear segment 121a without coming into interference with the curved end 122 on the last linear segment 121a, or the semicircular wire segment connecting the last linear segment 121a with the penultimate linear segment 121.

In operation of the furniture spring arrangement 110 hereinbefore described, the link members 10 function as fixed anchor members while the link member 10a functions as a radius member. The spring band attachment apparatus 111 embodying features of the first form of the invention thus provides a flexible connection at the back rail without need for a helical spring. Furthermore, a standard spring band 1 12 end is utilized without a special Z-hook, for example. Each of these factors contribute to considerable savings in cost.

The link members come in various standard lengths, as hereinbefore set out. Consequently, they accommodate regular loop sinuous, expanded loop sinuous, or super-loop sinuous spring band readily by merely choosing suitable link member lengths. Furthermore, for the first time, one length of modified sinuous spring band can be used in seat frames of several different sizes merely by varying the length of the cooperating link members. The saving in inventory is obvious, of course, resulting in substantial cost-savings.

The snap-on clips 14 provided on the link members 10 (10a) make for quick and easy interconnection of link members or link members and spring band linear segments. Resilient retention of the snapped-on link member is assured by the configuration and dimension of the clips 14. In addition, this construction not only provides, for the first time, link-on-link articulation (impossible with known, closed-end, parallel-leg U- links), but also avoids the laborious and timeconsuming threading operation necessary with known closed-end U-links; i.e., the last linear segment of a spring band had to be threaded through closed loops on the free ends of the U-link legs to attach it to the link and, accordingly, the rail.

In the aforedescribed furniture spring arrangement 110, the attachment apparatus 111 is illustrated with a single link member 10 at the front rail 113 and articulated link members 10 and 10a at the back rail 114. It is contemplated, of course, that a single link member connection (not articulated) can be used at the back rail 114.

Turning now to FIG. 5, another furniture spring arrangement of the sinuous band type is illustrated generally at 210. The spring arrangement 210 includes a sinuous spring band attachment apparatus 211 embodying features of a second form of the present invention, mounting a sinuous spring band 112 between the front rail 113 and the back rail 114 of a conventional furniture frame. The spring arrangement 210 is, in fact, identical to the spring arrangement hereinbefore discussed, except insofar as the construction and operation of its attachment apparatus 211.

In fact, even the components of the attachment apparatus 21 1 are identical to those employed in the attachment apparatus 111 of the spring assembly 110. In this light, link members 10 are inserted through suitably formed holes in the front and back rails 113 and 114 in the manner hereinbefore discussed. At this point, a radius link member 10a is employed to connect the forwardmost linear segment 121b of the spring band 122 with the clips 14 on the anchor link member 10 seated in the front rail 113.

The rearwardmost linear segment 121a of the band 112 is then connected to the clips 14 of the anchor link member 10 seated in the back rail 114 by two interconnected radius link members 111a and 10b. The radius link members 10a and 101; are interconnected with each other and to the spring band linear segment 121a with their clips 14 facing downwardly, in the manner hereinbefore discussed. The link members 11), 10a and 10b, are, once again, identical in configuration except insofar as length selection is concerned.

It will now be seen that the connection between the spring band 112 and the back raii 114 by the attachment apparatus 211 is an articulated connection which, as the band 112 is pressed downwardly by a seated subject, assumes the profile illustrated in dotted lines in FIG. 5. Excellent softness and deep drop characteristics, plus a wholly new capability to conform to body contours, are afforded by this attachment apparatus 211' configuration, while strong uplift is still provided to support the seated subject and press upwardly firmly against the buttocks and thighs of the subject. By selecting the lengths of the anchor link 10 and the radius links 1110 and 10b at the back rail 114 in the spring assembly 2111, precise positioning of the area of greatest resilience, deep-drop and uplift can be made in assembling the furniture spring. The effect is to provide a high degree of selectivity in spring assembly construction a customizing capability, in effect.

At the front rail 113, the use of a radius link 10a connection to the spring band 112 permits the front end of the band 112 to move downwardly under the weight of a seated subject. This affords additional softness and deep-drop at the front end of the spring band 1 12 also, without losing necessary uplift, while also assuring that there will be no cushion gap between the cushion and the front at the front rail 113 as the subject is seated. As will thus be seen, the attachment apparatus 211 also has distinct advantages from an aesthetic standpoint.

Attention is now directed to FIGS. 6-8 where a fumiture spring arrangement of the sinuous band type is illustrated generally at'310 (only the back rail portion). The spring arrangement 310 includes a sinuous spring band attachment apparatus 311 embodying features of a' third form of the invention, mounting a sinuous spring band 112 bertween the front rail (not shown and the back rail 114 of a conventional furniture frame.

FIGS. 6 and 7 illustrate one modification of the attachment apparatus 311, while FIG. 8 illustrates another modification of the attachment apparatus. Each again employs the basic building block link members 10, hereinbefore discussed, to connect the back end of a sinuous spring band 112 to the back frame rail 114.

Referring first to FIGS. 6 and 7, the back end of the spring band 112 is connected to the rail 114 by a pair of interconnected link members, the anchor link member 10 seated through suitably formed holes 125 in the rail 114, and the radius link member 10a snapped into the clips 14 of the anchor link member 10 in the manner illustrated in FIGS. 3 and 4.

The radius link member 10a, unlike the connection made with the spring band 112 as illustrated in FIGS. 3 and 4, however, is not clipped over the last linear segment 121a in the spring band. Rather, the clips 14 of the radius link member 10a are clipped over the third linear segment 121d of the spring band 112 and the legs 11 of the link member 10a pass beneath and support the penultimate linear segment 121C and the last linear segment 121a of the band 112 in the manner illustrated (or in the alternative, clips 14 might be clipped over the penultimate linear wire segment 121C and pass beneath only the last segment 121a).

The effect of the mounting configuration afforded by the attachment apparatus 311 is to induce a downwardly directed torque in the spring band 112 adjacent the rear end of the band. By combining this torque inducing attachment apparatus combination at the back rail 114 with a similar arrangement at the front rail (not shown) for example, a dynamic interplay of torque forces is effected when a subject is seated on the spring assembly 110, producing highly desirable center resilience and upward thrust or uplift. In the alternative, the attachment apparatus 311 is also used with an arrangement at the front rail similar to that illustrated in either FIG. 3 r FIG. 5, with excellent results.

The attachment apparatus 311 illustrated in FIG. 8 is quite similar to that illustrated in FIGS. 6 and 7, except,

as will be readily recognized, an additional radius link 10b is employed with the radius link 10a to connect the rear end ofthe band 112 to the back rail 114. This connection provides, in addition to the torque effects hereinabove discussed, the articulation of the linkage and conformity to body contours similar to that illustrated in FIG. and hereinbefore described in substantial detail. The advantages of such an articulated linkage are effectively added to those forthcoming from the use of the torque inducing mounting mode of the radius link b.

Turning now to FIGS. 9 and 10, another anchor link member embodying features of the present invention is illustrated generally at 20. The anchor link member performs the same function as the link member 10, hereinbefore discussed, where the latter is used as an anchor member. In contrast to the anchor radius link member 10, however, the anchor member 20 is a one leg member and has certain applications of particular advantage.

The anchor link member 20 includes a main leg 21 and a base leg 22. The anchor member 20 is, in the present illustration, fabricated of steel wire bent back upon itself so that the leg 21 is actually formed of two pieces of wire extending parallel to each other while the base leg 22 is formed of single strand sections of wire extending away from each other in axial alignment.

The free end of the leg 21 of the anchor member 20 is bent to form a clip 24 having the shape of a shepherds crook, similar to the clips 14 of the link member 10. The mouth 26 of the clip 24 is similarly slightly narrower than the diameter of eight-gauge wire, in the manner hereinbefore discussed in detail.

At opposite ends of the base leg 22 are formed anchor barbs 28. These barbs 28, which are preferably swaged from the wire stock, are formed upwardly and inwardly toward the clip 24, in the manner best illustrated in FIG. 10.

Referring now to FIGS. 11 and 12, attachment apparatus for securing the sinuous spring band 112 to the back rail 114 of a furniture frame or the like is illustrated generally at 411. It will be noted that the back rail 114 is, in this illustration, a curved rail. The attachment apparatus 411 embodying this fourth form of the present invention is especially adapted to attachment of a sinuous spring band to a curved rail, although it should be understood it might equally as well be used with a straight rail.

To mount the sinuous spring band 112 in the seat frame, i.e., connect it to the back rail 114 in the present illustration, a hole approximately 7/ 1 6ths inches in diameter is bored horizontally through the rail 114 at a selected height, in a manner hereinbefore discussed. The leg 21 of an anchor member 20 is inserted through the hole from the back of the rail with the base leg 22 in horizontal relationship until the barbs 28 engage the sink into the wooden rail 114.

With the anchor member 20 in this relationship, a radius member 10d is positioned so that its base leg 12 faces the mouth 26 of the clip 24 on the anchor member 20. The base leg 12 is then snapped through the mouth 26 into the clip 24. To assure that the link 10d remains centered relative to the clip 24, the base leg 12 is bent outwardly or dimpled exactly at its midpoint, as at 17. The clip 14 seats in this dimple 17.

The clips 14 of the leg member 10d are, as will be recognized, then merely clipped over the last linear segment 121a of the sinuous spring band 112. Because the band rail 114 is curved and, in the present illustration, the band connection to the rail is made on the curve, the anchor member 20 and the link member 10d are interconnected at an angle to each other, as seen in FIG. 11, to accommodate this curvature while making a balanced connection of the spring band to the rail. It is the construction of the anchor link member 20 and the radius link member 10d which accommodates the curvature of the back rail 114 in the connection. The single leg link member 20 cannot rotate to disturb the balance connection with the spring band 112 once the connection is made because the barbs 28 dig into the back of the back rail 114 and prevent rotation, regardless of what twisting forces might be applied to the leg member 20.

FIGS. 13 and 14 illustrate, at 611, another attachment apparatus for securing a sinuous spring band 112 to the back rail 114 of a furniture frame or the like. The attachment apparatus 611 embodies a fifth form of the invention. It is quite similar to the attachment apparatus 411 hereinbefore discussed. The sole difference between the attachment'apparatus 611 and the attachment apparatus 411 is, in fact, the construction of the anchor link member 30 in the attachment apparatus 611.

The anchor link member 30 is shaped generally like the aforedescribed anchor link member 20. It has a main leg 31 crossed by the base leg 32. Unlike the anchor link member 20, however, the anchor link member 30 is fabricated of hard steel strip folded back upon itself in a manner best illustrated in FIG. 14.

To connect the leg 31 of the anchor link member 30 to the last linear segment 121a of a sinuous spring band 112, for example, or to the base leg 12 of a radius link member 10, as illustrated in FIG. 13, an undercut anchor notch 34 is formed in the upper edges of the double-walled leg 31 of the anchor leg member 30. The notch .34 is undercut at both ends, as at 36. The undercut 36 adjacent the free ends of the leg 31 serves as a seat for the base leg 12 of the link member 10, for example, while the opposite undercut 36 is effective to cause the base leg 12 to remain in the notch 34 if the spring assembly is subjected to a sudden shock load and the base leg 12 tends to become unseated. The aperture to the notch 34 is, of course, large enough to slip an eight of 8% gauge wire through it, but the wire cannot inadvertantly pop out of the notch because of the narrowness of this gap and the relationship of the undercuts36.

Similar to the anchor link assembly member 20, the anchor link member 30 is provided with upwardly and inwardly extending barbs 38 at the free ends of the base leg 32. These barbs serve the same purpose as the barbs 28 hereinbefore discussed in relation to the anchor link member 20 in that they dig into the back rail of the frame and prevent rotation of the link member 30.

Referring now to FIGS. and 16, occasionally it is desirable to attach a sinuous spring band 112 having a conventional Z-hook 119 formed on one (or both) ends of the band to a rail, the back rail 114 in this illustration. In such case, it is merely necessary to use the single leg anchor link member hereinbefore described, with a single leg radius link member 40 em.- bodying features of the invention. The single leg radius link member 40 is a single piece of steel wire 41 having its opposite ends bent backwardly to form generally re verse-U or shepherds crook shaped clips 44. The mouths 46 of the clips 44 are relatively wide so as to slip freely over the clips 24 in the anchor link member 20, for example, at one end. At the opposite end, the link 44 seats over the Z-hook 119 on the sinuous spring band 112, in the manner illustrated in FIG. 16.

Like the link members 10 (and 10a), the link member 20 affords a wide range of spring arrangement adaptability by coming in a prescribed range of lengths. Five lengths are available as follows:

Link member A 1 /a inches in length Link member B l 4 inches in length Link member C 2 inches in length Link member D 2 A inches in length Link member E 2 /2 inches in length Most of the attachment apparatus and link members hereinbefore described are shown attaching sinuous spring bands 112 to the rails at the same height. It

should be understood, however, that by merely varying the height of the holes 125 bored in the back rail, the height of the attachment apparatus can be varied and the profile of the furniture seat controlled.

Insofar as the construction and operation of the link members 10 are concerned, their converging legs 11 and snap-on links 14 provide for easily interlinking a succession of link members so that they cannot slip off each other or the end linear segment of the spring band. In this regard, since the converging legs tend to narrow further with increased load, increased loading only tends to make the link member seat more solidly.

Each size of radius articulate link 10 is color-dip coded. Accordingly, by merely referring to a color chart, an assembler can consistently put together a spring assembly to achieve programmed desirable results. According to the method of the present invention, the link members are color-coded as follows:

LINK MEMBERS 20 Link member A black Link member B red Link member C blue Link member D green Link member E yellow LINK MEMBERS 10 Link member A plain Link member B black Link member C red Link member D blue Link member E green Link member F yellow Link member G plain Link member H brown They are thus color-coded according to length and stocked in a multi-compartment, open top, working container having corresponding color-coded compartments. Once the color scheme is known, an assembler unerringly takes links from a proper compartment and returns unused links to it.

FIGS. 17-20 illustrate yet a sixth form of attachment apparatus, shown in two modifications at 511 and 511a, securing a sinuous spring band 112 to the back rail 114 (or the front rail) of a frame. The attachment apparatuses 511 and 511a are broadly similar to that illustrated in FIGS. 11 and 16, in that a horseshoeshaped radius link member 10 or a single radius link member 40 are employed to connect the end of a spring band 112 to the rail 114. However, here the sim ilarity ends in that rail top anchor link members 550 and 551, constructed according to the present invention, secure the radius link members 10 or 40 to the rail top. I

Referring first to FIGS. 17-18, the anchor link member 550 comprises a length of steel wire bent roughly in the shape of a rectangle. One side of the roughly rectangularly shaped piece of steel wire is formed so as to have three evenly spaced half loops 560, 561 and 562 along its length. The opposite side of the rectangle is formed of the free ends of the wire length bent backwardly, as at 566, to form an angle of approximately with the rectangle. At the free ends are formed overlapping loops 567.

The anchor link member 550 is secured to the top of the back rail 114, in the present invention, by a conventional staple (not shown) or a pair of anchor nails 570 of conventional construction. As will be recognized, one of the nails 570 is driven through the overlapping loops 567 while the other is driven into one acute angle corner of the wire rectangle, at 566. This eccentric nailing arrangement is used because the anchor link member 550 is, in the present illustration, mounted on a curved back rail 114, similar to the mounting shown in FIG. 11 and, accordingly, the spring band 112 extends at an angle to the rail. By nailing the member 550 in the manner illustrated, substantial alignment of the nails 570 with the band 112 is achieved, thus effecting maximum anchor strength. It the anchor link members 550 were mounted on a straight rail, it would be appropriate to put a staple or nails 570 at the two acute angle corners. The acute angle corners and the overlapping loops form an equilateral triangle, as will be recognized.

It will be noted in the aforedescribed attachment apparatus 511 that the link member 40 is seated in the half loop 562 of the anchor link member 550. This arrangement is to accommodate the curved rail 114. Should the anchor link member 550 be used on a straight rail, in the manner alluded to in the preceding paragraph, the link member 40 would be seated in the center half loop 561. By the same token, on the opposite curve of a curved back rail 114, the anchor link member 550 would seat the link member 40 in the half loop 560.

Turning now to FIGS. 19 and 20, the attachment apparatus 511a is similar to that illustrated in FIGS. 17 and 18 except for the construction of the anchor link member 551 and the use of a link member d in lieu ofa single leg link member 40 to make connection with a spring band; in this case a standard end band. The anchor link member 551 is, unlike the anchor link member 550, fabricated of a generally rectangular steel plate. The plate has apertures 581 and 582 diepunched at its innermost corners. Between the apertures S81 and 582, and disposed at a slightly greater distance from the inner edge of the member 551, a tang 585 is die-punched downwardly out of the plate, as best seen in FIG. 20, leaving an aperture 586 in the plate. This tang 585 is a self-locating device that automatically positions the clip correctly on the rail. The aper' ture 586 is centered between the apertures 581 and 582.

Apertures 590 and 591 are formed in the plate link member 551 adjacent the other two corners of the plate and are adapted to receive anchor nails or a staple 592 to secure the anchor member 551 to the back rail 114. In the present illustration, the attachment apparatus is used on a straight rail, as will be recognized. A third aperture 595 positioned inwardly of the apertures 590 and 591 and intermediate them, proves the leg 551 the same capability as that described in relation to the attachment apparatus 51 1 when employed with a curved rail; i.e., anchor nails or a staple can be aligned with the axis of a spring band assembly 112 extending from a curved rail. Once again, the apertures 590, 591 and 595 form an equilateral triangle.

In considering the various forms of attachment apparatus embodying features of the invention, it will quickly be recognized that none, of necessity, employs a helical spring or springs. in effect, the link member 10, 40, etc., supplant the helical springs, providing the articulate connection highly desirable in luxury seating. In practice, it has been found that the longitudinal resiliency of a helical spring is not missed except in unusual circumstances. A great saving in cost is thus afforded, of course, by the features of this invention.

While several embodiments described herein are at present considered to be preferred, it is understood that various modifications and improvements may be made therein.

What is desired to be claimed and secured by Letters Patent of the United States is:

l. A generally horseshoe-shaped link member for joining a sinuous spring band to a rail of a furniture frame or the like, comprising:

a. a pair of side legs joined at corresponding one ends by a base leg,

b. the free end of each of said side legs having clip means thereon for seating on the base leg of another of said link members or a linear segment of the spring band,

c. each of said clip means having an open mouth facing generally in the direction of said base leg for receiving the other of said link members or a linear segment of the spring band, and

d. said side legs converging from one predetermined distance apart between opposed inner surfaces at their joinder with said base leg to a lesser predetermined distance apart between outer surfaces at said clip means.

2. The link member of claim 1 further characterized in that:

a. it is fabricated of hard steel wire.

3. The link member of claim 1 further characterized in that:

a. said one predetermined distance is substantially l5/l6ths inches and said lesser predetermined distance is between 1 l/l6ths inches and l3/l6ths inches.

4. The link member of claim 1 further characterized in that:

a. said lesser predetermined distance is at least /sth inch less than said one predetermined distance.

5. The link member of claim 1 further characterized in that:

a. said clip means each comprise the end of said free leg bent back upon itself to form a mouth for reception of wire means;

said mouth having a width of 0.1550 0.000/0003 inches.

6. The link member of claim 1 further characterized in that:

a. said base leg has a generally semi-circular curved section dimpled out from its axis away from said free legs and intermediate them.

7. In a furniture spring assembly including a sinuous spring band and a frame, the improvement in attachment apparatus for mounting said sinuous spring band on the frame rails, comprising:

a. a pair of horizontally spaced holes formed through one of said rails a predetermined first distance apart;

b. a generally horseshoe-shaped link member having its free legs extending from a connecting base leg through said holes; and

c. clip means on the free ends of said free legs having open mouths through which are seated a linear seg- V ment of the spring band;

d. said free legs converging toward said other from a second predetermined distance apart between opposed inner surfaces adjacent the base leg of said link member to a third predetermined distance apart between outer surfaces at said clip means;

e. said third predetermineddistance being less than said first predetermined distance.

8. In a furniture spring assembly including a sinuous spring band and a frame, the improvement in attachment apparatus for mounting said sinuous spring band on the frame rails, comprising:

a. a pair of horizontally spaced holes formed through one of said rails a predetermined first distance apart;

b. a first generally horseshoe-shaped link member having its free legs extending from a connecting base leg through said holes;

c. clip means on the free ends of said free legs of said first link member;

d. a second generally horseshoe-shaped link member having free legs extending from a connecting base link;

e. said clip means on the free ends of said free legs of said first link member seated on said connecting base leg of said second link member;

f. clip means on the free ends of said free legs of said second link member seated on a linear segment of the spring band; and

g. the free legs of each link member converging toward each other from a second distance apart between opposed inner surfaces adjacent the base leg of a corresponding link member to a third predetermined distance apart between outer surfaces of said clip means on said free legs;

h. said third predetermined distance being less than said first predetermined distance.

9. The improvement in attachment apparatus of claim 8 further characterized in that:

a. said clip means on said second link member are seated on a linear segment of said spring band which is spaced inwardly of the corresponding end of said spring band and the free legs of said second link member extend under and support the last lin ear segment of said spring band at said corresponding end of said spring band.

10. The improvement in attachment apparatus of claim 9 further characterized in that:

a. said clip means on said second link member are seated on the third linear segment from the end of said band. 7

111. In a furniture spring assembly including a sinuous spring band and a frame, the improvement in attachment apparatus for mounting said sinuous spring band on the frame rails, comprising:

a. a pair of horizontally spaced holes formed through one of said rails a predetermined first distance apart;

b. a first generally horseshoe-shaped link member having its free legs extending from a connecting base leg through said holes;

0. clip means on the free ends of said free legs of said first link member;

d. a second generally horseshoe-shaped link member having its free legs extending from a connecting base leg;

e. said clip means on the free ends of said free legs of said first link member seated on said connecting base leg of said second link member;

f. clip means on the free ends of said free legs of said second link member;

g. a third generally horseshoe-shaped link member having its free legs extending from a connecting base leg;

j. said third predetermined distance being less than said first predetermined distance.

12. Attachment apparatus for joining a sinuous spring band to a rail of a furniture frame or the link, comprising:

a. outer link means connected to said rail and extending inwardly thereof; and

b. radius link means connecting said outer link means with one end of said sinuous spring band;

c. said radius link means comprising an elongated wire member having clip means formed on each end thereof;

d. each of said clip means comprise an end portion of said wire member bent back upon itself to form a mouth for reception of wire means.

13. The attachment apparatus of claim 12 further characterized in that:

a. said elongated wire member being substantially straight between said clip means,

b. said mouths being formed generally in the shape of a shepherds crook.

14-. The attachment apparatus of claim 12 further characterized in that:

a. said outer link means comprises a link member having an extending main leg and a cross leg;

b. a hole formed through one of said rails;

c. said main leg extending through said hole so that said cross leg seats against said rail.

15. The attachment apparatus of claim 14 further characterized in that:

a. barb means are formed on opposite ends of said cross leg for biting into said rail and preventing rotation of said anchor link member about the axis of its main leg.

. 16. The attachment apparatus of claim M further characterized in that:

a. clip means are formed on the free end of said main b. said clip means adapted to seat on said radius link means.

17. The attachment apparatus of claim 14 further characterized in that:

a. said main leg of said anchor link member has an undercut depression formed therein for receiving and retaining one end of said radius link means.

18. The attachment apparatus of claim 16 further characterized in that:

a. said radius link means comprising a generally horseshoe-shaped link member having its free legs extending from a connecting base leg;

b. clip means on the free ends of said legs seated on said one end of said sinuous spring band means; 0. said free legs converging toward each other from a first predetermined distance apart between opposed inner surfaces adjacent the base leg of said link member to a lesser second predetermined distance apart between outer surfaces at said clip means.

19. The attachment apparatus of claim 12 further characterized in that:

a. said radius link means comprises a single leg link member;

b. the clip means on one end of said radius link member being seated on said anchor link means and the clip means on the opposite end of said radius link member being seated on a Z-hook formed on the free end of said sinuous spring band.

20. The attachment apparatus of claim 12 further characterized in that:

a. said outer link means comprises a generally rectangular wire member having a front segment, side segments, and a back segment;

b. said back segment being formed by the free ends of said wire member extending into immediately adjacent relationship with each other;

c. said front segment having three generally halfloops formed therein for selectively receiving and seating said radius link means.

21. The attachment apparatus of claim further charcterized in that:

a. said back segment of said generally rectangular wire member is defined by the opposite free ends of said wire member extending inwardly toward said front segment at acute angles to said side segments;

b. loop means formed in the free ends of said wire member and overlying each other in said generally rectangular wire member configuration to provide an aperture for receipt of nail means or the like to anchor said anchor link means to said rail.

22. The attachment apparatus of claim 12 further characterized in that:

a. said outer link means comprises a generally rectangular plate member;

b. a plurality of apertures formed adjacent the front edge of said plate member for selectively receiving one end of said radius link means;

0. a plurality of apertures formed adjacent the back edge of said plate member for receiving nail or staple means or the like to secure said plate to said rail;

(1. said plurality of apertures adjacent said back edge being arranged in triangular configuration with at least one aperture formed adjacent each back edge corner of said plate member and another aperture formed intermediate said corner apertures and spaced at a greater distance from the back edge of said plate member.

23. The attachment apparatus of claim 22 further characterized in that:

a. said plurality of apertures formed adjacent the front edge of said plate member including a central aperture formed by shearing a tang downwardly out of said plates;

b. said tank being effective to properly locate said anchor link means at the inside of said rail.

24. The attachment apparatus of claim 16 further characterized in that:

a. said main leg clip means comprising a mouth defined by a straight portion of said main leg on one side of a portion of said main leg adjacent said free end which curves toward said straight portion and then away from it in the direction of said cross leg.

25. Attachment apparatus for joining a sinuous spring band to a rail of a furniture frame or the like, comprising:

a. a generally U-shaped link member having a pair of side legs joined at corresponding one ends by a base leg,

b. the free end-of each of said side legs having clip means thereon for seating on the base leg of another of said link members or a linear segment of the spring band,

c. said clip means each having an open mouth facing generally in the direction of said base leg for receiving the other of said link members or a linear segment of the spring band, and

d. said side legs converging from one predetermined distance apart between opposed inner surfaces at their joinder with said base leg to a lesser predetermined distance apart between outer surfaces at said clip means.

26. The attachment apparatus of claim 25 further characterized by and including:

a. means connecting said link member to said rail;

b. said connecting means including an elongate member seated on said baSe leg of said link member.

27. The attachment apparatus of claim 12 further characterized in that:

a. said radius link means comprises a generally horseshoe-shaped link member having a pair of side legs joined at corresponding one ends by a base leg;

b. said base leg having a dimple formed therein for seating on one of said clip means.

28. In a furniture spring assembly including a sinuous spring band and a frame, the improvement in attachment apparatus for mounting said sinuous spring band on the frame rails, comprising:

a. an anchor link member secured to one of said rails;

b. attachment means on the free end of said anchor link member;

c. a first generally horseshoe-shaped link member having its free legs extending from a connecting base leg;

(1. said attachment means on the free end of said anchor link member attaching it to the base leg of said first link member;

e. open mouth clip means on the free ends of the free legs of said first link member;

f. a second generally horseshoe-shaped link member having its free legs extending from a connecting base leg;

g. open mouth clip means on the free ends of the free legs of said second link member connected to one end of the spring band; and

h. the free legs of each of said first and second link members converging toward each other from a predetermined distance apart between opposed inner surfaces adjacent the base leg of a corresponding link member to a lesser predetermined distance apart between outer surfaces of said clip means on said free legs.

29. The attachment apparatus of claim 28 further characterized by and including:

a. means formed on the free end of said main leg for connecting said link member with the end of said sinuous spring band.

30. The attachment apparatus of claim 28 further characterized in that:

a. said two strip sections of said main leg are spaced apart along their length.

31. The attachment apparatus of claim 14 further characterized in that:

a. said main leg of said link member comprises two main leg sections extending parallel to each other and spaced apart a predetermined distance in excess of /8 inch.

32. The attachment apparatus of claim 27 furthcr characterized in that:

a. said link member is fabricated of wire.

33. In a furniture spring arrangement including a sinuous spring band and a frame, the improvement in attachment apparatus for mounting said sinuous spring band on the frame rails, comprising:

a. a generally horseshoe-shaped link member having free legs extending from a connecting base leg,

b. means securing said connecting base leg to one of said rails,

c. clip means on the free ends of said free legs,

d. each of said clip means having an open mouth facing generally in the direction of said base leg,

c. said clip means being connected to said spring band by being seated on a linear segment of said spring band which is spaced inwardly of the corresponding end of said spring band and the free legs of said link member extending under and supporting the last linear segment of said spring band at said corresponding end, and

e. the free legs of said link member converging toward each other from a predetermined distance apart between opposed inner surfaces adjacent the base leg of said link member to a lesser predetermined distance apart between outer surfaces of said free legs at said clip means.

34. The improvement in attachment apparatus of claim 33 further characterized in. that:

a. said clip means are seated on the third linear segment from said corresponding end of said spring band.

35. The link member of claim 1 further characterized in that:

a. each of said clip means is formed generally in the shape of a shepards crook.

36. The attachment apparatus of claim 18 further characterized in that:

a. said base leg has a generally semi-circular curved section dimpled out from its axis away from said free legs and intermediate them,

b. said clip means on the free end of said main leg being seated on said curved section of said base leg.

Patent No.

Column 4, line Line Column 5,, line Column 6, line 66,

line 9, Line 9,

Column.

Column line 55,

line Line Column 15,

Column 11," line 49,

Column l2 line 6l,

LAWTON H.

nnrreu srrrrnsmrnnr orrrne 'llFlCfillTh CROSBY It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

"of" should be "or"; after "however" delete (comma) and insert (period) 0 "base" should'be "back",

"front" v(firstoccurrence) should be -frameber'tween" should be "between"; (not-shown" should be "(not shown) "band" should be -baCk "the", first occurrence; should read a "of" should be -or.

"proves" should be -provides "said" (secon d oocurrence) should be -each "of" (first occurrence) should be and--.

"base" shouldbe "base-Q.

-Page l- FORM PO-105O (yo-es) USCOIMM-DC 60376-P6 u.s. GOVERNMENT PRINTING omca; nu o-au-a 1 CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 Page UN'rirn starts PATENT OFFICE i ERTifiifiATIE UB1 '1.

Patent No. 3, 790 ,149 Dated February 5, 1974 Inventor H o It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

The following claim, Claim 36 of the application, should be included as patent Claim 37:

-37. The attachment apparatus of Claim 14 further characterized inthat: p

' a. the link member of said outer link means comprises an elongated metal strip bent upon axes lying in the plane of the strip to form a main leg having two strip sections extending parallel to each other and a cross-leg having two strip sections extending in alignment with each other,

Signed and sealed this 19th day of November 1974.

(SEAL) Attest:

MCCOY I GIBSON JR. C. MARSHALL DANN Attesting Officer Commissioner of Patents M FO-1050 (10-69) H USCOMM'DC 50376-P69 k ".5. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: ISIS 0-366-31,

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4055865 *Jun 16, 1976Nov 1, 1977Morley Furniture Spring CorporationSpring attachment assemblies
US4228991 *Dec 29, 1978Oct 21, 1980Morley Furniture Spring CorporationSeat spring assembly and spring unit
US4303232 *Oct 5, 1979Dec 1, 1981Morley Furniture Spring CorporationSeat spring assembly (torque-coil)
US4815717 *Dec 30, 1982Mar 28, 1989Morley Furniture Spring CorporationSpring assembly for upholstered furniture
US7658995Jun 13, 2005Feb 9, 2010Toho Titanium Co., Ltd.Nickel powder comprising sulfur and carbon, and production method therefor
EP1493618A2 *Jul 2, 2004Jan 5, 2005Fico Cables, LdaSeat structure
EP2394846A1 *Jul 2, 2004Dec 14, 2011Fico Cables, Lda.Seat structure
Classifications
U.S. Classification267/110
International ClassificationA47C31/06, A47C7/30, A47C31/04
Cooperative ClassificationA47C7/30, A47C31/06, A47C31/04
European ClassificationA47C7/30, A47C31/06, A47C31/04