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Publication numberUS3790170 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 5, 1974
Filing dateApr 3, 1972
Priority dateJun 22, 1970
Publication numberUS 3790170 A, US 3790170A, US-A-3790170, US3790170 A, US3790170A
InventorsD Alexander
Original AssigneeSmall Business Administ
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Automatic electric baseball game
US 3790170 A
Abstract
A baseball game apparatus includes a defensive control unit with pitch selection switches manually controlled by a player serving as pitcher, and an offensive control unit with pitch anticipation switches on which a player serving as batter selects and swings at or passes an anticipated pitch. A mixer stepping unit randomly selects the resulting play from a category of plays determined by the degree of correspondence between the defensive and offensive pitch switches. The selected play controls sequential energization of a series of lights under a translucent playing field to simulate the movement of a batted ball. A player stepping unit energizes a further series of lights to animate men which converge towards the batted ball flight path. A base running relay energizes lights arranged in a diamond-shaped pattern to animate runners advancing around a base path. Interlocking relays allow one runner to be held on a base while another runner advances. A motor driven play animation unit energizes further series of lights to simulate the ball being returned to the infield. A plurality of stepping relays records the progress of the game, and in response to predetermined positions, such as third out, control energization of the relays and lights to modify the game condition then being displayed.
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United States Patent [191 Alexander, Jr.

[ AUTOMATIC ELECTRIC BASEBALL GANIE [75] Inventor: Delbert S. Alexander, Jr., Evanston,

Ill.

[73] Assignee: Small Business Administration,

Washington, DC.

22 Filed: Apr. 3, 1972 21 Appl.No.: 240,671

Related [15. Application Data [60] Division of Ser. No. 48,505, June 22, 1970, Pat. No. 3,655,189, which is a continuation of Ser. No. 683,885, Nov. 17, 1967, abandoned.

Primary Examiner--Anton O. Oechsle Assistant Examiner-Harry G. Strappello Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Hofgren, Wegner, Allen, Stellman & McCord THRO INFIE FROM PP4| CATCH CATCH 53 @gggisrsra Feb. 5, 1974 [57] ABSIRACT A baseball game. apparatus includes a defensive control unit with pitch selection switches manually controlled by a player serving as pitcher, and an offensive control unit with pitch anticipation switches on which a player serving as batter selects and swings at or passes an anticipated pitch. A mixer stepping unit randomly selects the resulting play from a category of plays determined by the degree of correspondence between the defensive and offensive pitch switches. The selected play controls sequential energization of a series of lights under a translucent playing field to simulate the movement of a batted ball. A player stepping unit energizes a further series of lights to animate men which converge towards the batted ball flight path. A base running relay energizes lights arranged in a diamond-shaped pattern to animate runners advancing around a base path. Interlocking relays allow one runner to be held on a base while another runner advances. A motor driven play animation unit energizes further series of lights to simulate the ball being returned to the infield. A plurality of stepping relays records the progress of the game, and in response to predetermined positions, such as third out, control energization of the relays and lights to modify the game condition then being displayed.

5 Claims, 20 Drawing Figures THROW BACKTO lNFlELDlDOU-Zl THROW BACK TO INFIELDKSIN'I) CATCH FROM OUTFIELD 100A .sm LITE 200 m FAST BALL 5g;- zotcunva LITE ouRvE suoen LITE 20s zommsms urwoursmz me 20:; 4 .t, STRIKE LITE 205 FIGA -[ours @I 3Q5\[STRIKES@@OI IBALLs I I loo-1 :olloo'z hol- FROM ours FROM STRIKE FROM BALI-VISITOR 22:25 STEPPING umr STEPPING RELAY STEPPING SCORE (FIG. u (FIGJS) PATENTEDFEB 51974 3,790,170-

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Y W m as V RN. .1 N E Rm M E O VF H 00 PAIENTEU 3.790170 sum 100F111 MIXER STEPPING UNIT DISC-2 MOB TWO BASE. STOP 28 s DM (FROM D RELAY) AM (FROM A RELAY) MOB THREE BASE STOP 3 B s BM (FROM 8 RELAY) CM(FROM C RELAY) NF-OUT MOB ONE BASE STOP (WBI CIRCUIT) 183' BASE RUNNING DISC.

I04 I05 TO BALLTSTRIKE RESE (R83) M08 MOTOR MOB MOB START STOP T 1 I50 (FROM HOME RELAY F MOB START ROM PD *2 PAD FIG-9 oaz BASE RUNNING RELAY PATENIED FEB 5 7 SHEET 1 40i 14 END OF INNING RESET UNIT-EID EID GMRLV EIM EIM

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AUTOMATIC ELECTRIC BASEBALL GAME RELATED APPLICATIONS This application is a division of my copending application Ser. No. 48,505, filed June 22, 1970, now US Pat. No. 3,655,189 issued Apr. ll, 1972, which is a continuation application of Ser. No. 683,885, filed Nov. 17, 1967, entitled Automatic Electric Baseball Game, and now abandoned.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention embodies improvements over prior automatic electric baseball games, wherein persons 'playingthis improved version are provided with revised and additional means which greatly enhance the playing, the competition and the enjoyment of the game. One of the main improvements over prior games is the variety of plays provided by the unique arrangement of the plays in this improved apparatus. Whereas, in a typical prior game of this type, the person acting as the Pitcher" makes a pitch DOWN THE MID- DLE and Batter swings DOWN THE MIDDLE the resulting play is a HOME RUN each time. Extensive observations and research have indicated that this is not substantially true. A batter would probably hit a Home Run on only two or three of 10 pitches even if the pitch is exactly where he anticipated it to be. Likewise, he would not hit a triple or double or make the same Out every time off the same situation. This improved invention categorizes the hits, outs, fouls, etc., in such a manner as to afford the person playing the game as much variety as they would expect in a real game of baseball. Another improvement that is incorporated in this invention is the selection of pitches afforded the pitcher, and the corresponding selection for the Batter. When the batter is anticipating the type of pitch that will be thrown, such as CURVE, FAST BALL, or SLIDER, it is of greater importance to him to know the kind of pitch being offered rather than the relative height of the pitch, as was used in prior games. A further improvement in this invention over the prior art is the extensive use of lighted animated men in conjunction with the simulated ball to enact each play on the playing field, and the incorporation of more than one play in the same series of lights to create additional suspense, plus the unique means employed to control the illumination of the various plays at the proper time.

One of the most outstanding features of this invention that brings it closer to real baseball, that is not disclosed in prior art, is the automatic advancement of the men around the bases. It will be noted that none of the prior art provides means whereby the men on base, and the batter, can advance in an irregular manner, such as when a base-runner is on third base and a simulated bouncing ball is hit to an infielder, the baserunner holds his position on third while the batter is thrown out at first base as he advances toward that base.

Another example is when a batter receives a walk and first base is not occupied. The batter must advance to first base while any other men on base have to retain their positions. Still another example is when the batter hits a long flyout to the outfield with less than two outs. The base-runner on third base normally advances to Home and scores, while any other base-runners hold their positions.

Another outstanding feature of this invention that brings it even more closely to real baseball but has not been disclosed in the prior art is the automatic functioning of certain plays common to the normal procedure of real baseball such as the Double Play. When a simulated bouncing ball is hit to an infielder and the base-runner is on first base with less than two outs, the ensuing play will simulate the fielder throwing the ball to one of his players covering second base, and he in turn will relay the ball to his first baseman before the advancing batter is able to reach the base. Likewise, on the same type of play but with base-runners on all three bases and with no outs the ensuing throw from the infielder fielding the ball would be to his catcher at Home Plate, creating a force out and preventing the base-runner on third from scoring as he advances from third base to home plate.

Still another novel feature of this invention not disclosed in the prior art is means whereby the defensive player may intentionally Walk a batter in hopes of creating a double-play. The offensive player on the other hand, has means whereby he can Attempt Sacrifice Bunt to advance his base-runner beyond a double-play situation, and at the same time put him in a scoring position.

The above mentioned feature points out another unique portion of this invention which is not incorporated in any of the prior art but is the basic part of the strategy involved in a real baseball game, i.e., the ability of a base-runner to advance two bases on certain Single hits, thereby allowing a man on second base to score while the batter only advances to first Base.

These examples, and others that will appear in the following specification are desirable part of any baseball game apparatus which wishes to follow the real game as truly as possible.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION This invention has been designed to be played by two or more persons wherein the greatest amount of competition, strategy and suspense is to be realized as one would expect in a real game of baseball played at the professional level. One person functions as an offensive operator and the other as a defensive operator, in which positions they alternate in each half inning. The game comprises a translucent playing field with miniature baseball players and the throwing and bouncing of a baseball animated thereon. These animations become visible only when their respective lights are illuminated beneath them. The playing field is preferably mounted in an upright position on a suitable base designed primarily to house the equipment used in the function of the game.

Extending from the base are a pair of cables with identical control panels attached. Each control panel has offensive and defensive means for playing the game, thus eliminating the necessity of the players having to change sides or positions, or having to exchange panels. One player represents the HOME TEAM and his opponent represents the VISITORS. The components employed in the functioning of the game, in addition to the lights used for animation are as follows:

a. A motorized Pitcher, unit primarily for simulating the throw from the Pitcher to the Catcher, and vice versa.

b. An electrically impulsed rotary stepping switch, referred to as the Mixer" from which each play of the game is eventually determined.

c. A bank of Play Control" electrical relays for controlling the action in the game.

d..A motorized Base-running unit for animating the base-runners.

e. A group of-interlocking type electrical relays designed to control the movement of the baserunners.

f. A transformer for reducing the current supply to a relatively low voltage.

g. Additional elctrically impulsed rotary stepping switches for registering the BALLS, STRIKES, OUTS, INNINGS, and the HOME TEAM and VISITORS scores.

The operators of the Control Panels more or less assume the roles of Manager and/or Coach for their respective teams. They make the decisions and the animated men on the playing field carry out their instructions. At the beginning of play, the person representing the Home Team has the authority over the animated men stationed on the playing field in the normal baseball positions. He therefore operates the defensive portion of his control panel. This portion provides him with a pair of manually operated rotary switches, one of which designates a variety of pitches common to baseball, such as CURVE, FAST BALL, and SLIDER. The other of which has designated areas such as OUT- SIDE, STRIKE, INSIDE and PITCI-IOUT. Thus he is able to decide the type of pitch to be thrown and the area in which he wants it to be thrown. He also is provided with a simple momentary contact PITCH switch for initiating the simulated throw from pitcher to batter.

The person representing the VISITOR at the beginning of play has authority over the batter and any subsequent base-runners. He operates the offensive portion of this control panel which provides him with a manually operated rotary switch which has CURVE, FAST BALL and SLIDER designations also. This rotary switch furthermore has an ATTEMPT SACRI- FICE BUNT designation. The offensive portion of the control panel also has a lever action switch that represents a bat for the batter.

As play begins, the defensive operator sets one of his rotary switches at CURVE, FAST BALL or SLIDER for the type of pitch he wants his animated Pitcher to throw. He also sets his other rotary switch at OUT- SIDE, STRIKE or INSIDE, indicating the area in which he wants the ball thrown. At the same time, the offensive operator attempts to anticipate what the defensive operator has selected by likewise setting his rotary switch at CURVE, FAST BALL or SLIDER. He then places his lever switch in the AT BAT position on his control panel. This allows the defensive operator to operate his PITCH switch, thereby causing his animated Pitcher to throw the simulated ball toward the animated batter. As the simulated ball approaches the batter the offensive operator has the choice of instructing his batter to swing at the pitch or let it pass. If he wants his batter to swing, he advances his lever to the SWING position on his control panel, as the pitch reaches the batter. Otherwise he merely lets the pitch pass to the catcher. He should then place his lever in the OUT OF BOX position on his control panel thereby preventing the pitcher from making another pitch until he returns to AT BOX.

Assuming that the first pitch was a CURVE IN- SIDE, and the offense had anticipated a Fast Ball, but decided to let it pass anyway, the words CURVE and INSIDE would both be illuminated in an allotted area inthe proximity of the playing field indicating to the offensive operator and other observers the exact pitch that was thrown. The BALL registering stepping switch owuld immediately step to its number 1 position and illuminate its respective light. By letting pitches pass occasionally, the defensive operator should be able to determine more accurately the type of pitch being thrown when he does decide to swing. As the PITCH unit finishes its cycle, the ball would be simulated as being thrown from the catcher back to the pitcher.

If the batter had swung at the pitch, chances are he would have hit a bouncing ball simulated in lights to one of the animated infielders, who in turn, would have fielded it and simulated a throw to his first Baseman before the batter reached the base. An out would immediately register on the OUTS units and the batter, of course, would not be permitted to occupy 1st base. The motorized units and the play control relays would all return to their normal position, ready for the next pitch.

It is to be noted that the play just explained was considered as probably an infield-out. This is the result of extensive study and observation of the real game of baseball. These studies and observations are strategically arranged in categories in regard to what particular play or plays would most likely occur under certain circumstances. It is commonly acknowledged by those associated with realbaseball that due to the speed of a pitched ball, the batter has to more or less anticipate the type of pitch that is to be thrown in order to achieve the best possible hit. Quite often he is completely fooled by a fastball when he figured the pitcher would probably throw a curve, or vice versa.

Thus, in the above example described as an infield out, the pitch was a CURVE INSIDE and the batter, expecting a FAST BALL, swung at the pitch. In this instance, he was fooled completely. First, he anticipated the wrong pitch, and secondly, he swung when he should have let the pitch pass since it was INSIDE. This particular play would be in the D category which is comprised of plays most likely to happen when the batter guesses wrong and swings at a bad pitch (outside or inside). This category consists of mostly outs.

Category A is comprised of plays most likely to occur when the pitch is a STRIKE and is exactly the type that the batter is anticipating. Naturally the best hits are included in this category, such as Home Runs, Triples, Double, etc., although the possibility of a Foul and a Swing-and-Miss are also included.

Category B is when the batter anticipates the type of pitch correctly and swings, but the pitch is a BALL (outside or inside), which he should have let pass. The plays in this category consist mainly of Fouls and Swung-and-Missed situations. The amount of outs in this category are relatively few to compensate for having guessed the right type of pitch, and likewise, the amount of hits are relatively few because he swings at a bad pitch.

Category C is substantially the same as category B. It is the result of the batter swinging at the wrong type of pitch, but the pitch is a Strike. His chances of getting a hit are slightly less than category B due to the fact that guessing the right type of pitch is considered more important than the area in which it is thrown.

These categories and their respective plays are charted in the following specification which details their performance in the game.

This summary should help to point out the exceptional amount of strategy that persons playing the game are obliged to employ when competing seriously, and the amount of fun and enjoyment afforded the persons who wish to pitch and swing at random, merely to watch the animated men perform on the playing field.

It is quite obvious these features mentioned above, and similar situations that appear hereinafter are definitely a part of real baseball and are necessary in a game apparatus that wishes to truly represent the sport.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS These features and other objects of the invention appear in full in the following specification taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings illustrating several preferred embodiments of the invention. In these drawings:

FIG. I is a direct view of a preferred embodiment of the game, showing the playing field in an upright position, and a top plan view of one of the control panels afforded each operator, each operators control panel being identical.

FIG. 1A is an enlarged plan view of a portion of FIG.

1, showing the legends contained therein.

FIG. 2 is a side plan view of FIG. I and a side plan view of the other of the identical control panels.

FIG. 3 is an oblique view of the type of motorized unit used to animate the men on the playing field and the bounding ball.

FIG. i is a side plan view of a portion of the same type of unit shown in FIG. 3, showing wiper fingers engaging one of the discs.

FIG. 5 shows diagrammatically the defensive switches and associated circuitry (upper portion of the figure), the offensive switches and associated circuitry (lower portion of the figure), and the play release relay-PR and the player selection relays A-B-C-D (middle portions of the figure).

FIG. 5A is a side view of one of the offensive switches of FIG. 5.

FIG. 6 shows plan views of the discs (or plates) mounted on the motorized pitch unit, showing the relative positions of the contacts on the face of the disc and the wiper fingers that engage them.

FIG. 7 is a symbolic drawing of a group ofPlay Control relays and their respective switches which control the enactment of each play in the game.

FIG. 8 is a plan view of disc No. 1 of the two discs mounted on the Mixer unit stepping switch, showing the categoric arrangement of the contacts thereon in regard to the chart of FIG. 8, and the relative positions of the wiper fingers that engage them.

FIG. 8A is a plan view of the Mixer Unit solenoid for stepping the Mixer switch, FIG. 8.

FIG. 9 shows plan views of the discs that are assembled on the Animation" motorized unit, showing the arrangement of various contacts thereon for illuminating the lights that animate the plays in the game.

FIG. I0 is a plan view of the light board located immediately beneath the translucent playing field in FIG. ll, showing only the lights that correspond with and are responsive to the contact arrangement of the play animation discs shown in FIG. 9.

FIG. 11 is a plan view of the face of the disc assembled on the BALLS, STRIKES, OUTS and INNINGS count stepping units showing the relative positions of the wiper fingers, in regard to the contacts thereon, and a symbolic diagram of the relay employed to change the players control panels from offensive operation to defensive operation and vice versa, each time three outs are made.

FIG. 112 is a plan view of disc No. 2 of the Mixer unit stepping switch likewise showing the categoric arrangement of certain contacts which correspond to, and represent the same plays as shown in disc No. 1 (FIG. 8).

FIG. 13 is a symbolic diagram of the interlocking type relays employed to control the advancement of the base-runners around the bases.

FIG. 13A is a symbolic diagram of the interlocking type relay also employed to control the advancement of the baserunners around the base.

FIG. M is a plan view of the face of the disc assembled on the motorized BASE RUNNING unit, showing the relative positions of the wiper fingers in regard to the contacts thereon.

FIG. 15 is a plan view of the diamond, or base running portion of the light board beneath the translucent playing field, showing only the lights involved in the advancement of men around the bases.

FIG. 16 is a plan view of the face of the disc assembled on a motorized END OF INNING reset unit, showing the relative positions of the wiper fingers in regard to the contacts thereon.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT The pitcher has nine different pitches to select. The pitches are: curve (inside, strike, outside); slider (inside, outside, strike); and fastball (inside, outside, strike). The batter has three pitches at which he can swing; curve, fastball, and slider. The selections of the batter and pitcher result in one of four categories which will be termed as A, B, C or D.

A category batter guessed correct type and the pitch was a strike. B category batter guessed correct type and the pitch was a ball (inside or outside). C category batter guessed incorrectly and the pitch was a strike. D category batter guessed incorrectly and the pitch was a ball (inside or outside). The play resulting from each of the categories listed above depends on the position of the Mixer Stepping Relay No. l (MSR No. I) FIG. 8. The particular play is then relayed to the proper Play Animation Disc (PAD) FIG. 9, which animates the play on the Playing Field FIG. 10.

After the selections are made by the pitcher and the batter, the batter must have this Swing Lever Switch (SLS) FIG. 5, at position (2) before the Pitch Button PB) can become operative. This prevents the pitcher from pitching before the batter is ready The Current Source (CS) to make the pitch button operative begins at the Swing Relay R1 FIG. 7. The circuit denoted as SW1 goes directly to position No. 2 of the swing lever (SLS) FIG. 5. When the batter puts his swing lever (SIS) FIG. 5 at the No. 2 position, the pitcher can complete the circuit to the pitch motor by closing the pitch button switch (PSB) FIG. 5. The pitch unit consists of a motor FIG. 6 which drives two sets of fingers around two separate discs. Pitch disc No. 1 (PD No. l) consist of the sets of common fingers (PFI, PF2, PF3 and PF4, PF5, PF 6), each set insulated from the other and also from the unit, FIG. 6. Pitch disc No. 2 has three sets of common fingers insulated from each other and from the unit (PF7, PF8, PF9 and PF10, PFll, PF12). Common fingers PF9 and PF are mounted at 180 rather than on top of each other as shown in FIG. 6. When the batter has his swing lever switch (SLS) at the 2 position, FIG 5, and the pitcher closes his pitch button, the pitch motor begins and will be kept running for one half revolution by the fingers PF9 and PF10, FIG. 6. The current source (CS) is transferred through the ringers from the right side of the pitch disc No. 2 directly to the pitch motor as shown in FIG. 6.

A series of plays will now be traced electrically. As the pitch'motor starts, see FIG. 6, pitch fingers PFl and PF2 of the PDI disc will pass over contacts 2, 3, 4, 5 and 1A which are connected directly to the playing field, FIG. 10. The current source is derived from normally closed contacts on the intentional walk relay (RS), thru circuit P. Contact 1A which represents the pitcher throwing the ball is held on, while the fingers PFl pass over the contacts 2, 3, 4, 5. This animates the pitcher throwing the ball to home plate. After one half revolution the pitch fingers PF4, PF5 and PF6 will be at the top and will perform the same function on the next pitch. As the ball approaches home plate, the batter will put his swing lever switch (SLS) FIG. 5, into position (3) which constitutes a swing. As the fingers PF3 crosses contact SWa, the circuit SW goes thru position (3) on the swing lever switch (SLS) FIG. 5, directly to energize the swing relay (R1) FIG. 7. All play control relays once energized stay energized until play is over, and they are released through play release relays (PR)FIG. 5. When the swing relay is energized SW1 is broken preventing the pitcher from pitching the ball until the play is over. Also, 100X is the current source for all men on the playing field except the batter and the catcher, and is broken to extinguish all of their lights. Likewise 100A the current source to the batter and catcher, must break. When the finger PF3 crosses over contact 91, the circuit goes from contact 91 on the swing relay (R1) FIG. 7 over to the batter selection switch FIG. 5.

For example, assume the pitcher selected a Fastball and a Strike, and the batter selected a Fastball. The circuit 91a, FIG. 5, will continue thru the batters Fa contacts up thru the pitchers F2 contacts and come out RT. The RT circuit then goes directly to pitchers Inside, Strike Outside switches, and continues thru contacts Skl and comes out A. The A circuit then goes directly to energize the Play Selection Relay A FIG. 5. The A2 circuit coming from the A relay goes directly to the A section of the Mixer Stepping Unit disc 1, FIG. 8. The Mixer Stepping Unit has four sets of insulated fingers denoted MFA, MFB, MFC, and MFD. Each set contains two common fingers. This unit is conventionally stepped to successive positions by a ratchet responding to impulses given to the Mixer Unit solenoid (MS FIG. 8A). Assume the fingers in the A section are resting on Tri (triple), the tri circuit goes directly to the proper play animation disc (201) FIG. 9. Returning to FIG. 6, when the pitch disc fingers PF7 and PF8 cross pads AM and PLC, the source of current begins at the swing relay (R1) (PLC), FIG. 7. The circuit goes directly to the play animation disc motor (AM). Once motor (AM) starts it is kept running, via disc 200 and common fingers AMF, for one half revolution in a manner similar to the pitch motor. All the other play animation discs of FIG. 9 (201-207) have two sets of insulated fingers, each set containing three common fingers, as illustrated on disc FBI in FIG. 6. The numerical contacts on the PADS are connected directly to the corresponding lamps on the playing field. As the A fingers of disc No. 201 pass over the contacts, the lamps on the playing field are successively illuminated so as to animate the ball bouncing and the players running, catching, and throwing the ball. As the unit completes its revolution and the pitching and the base-running units are back to their rest positions, relay (PR) will be energized as later described, causing relay A, Swing, relay (R1), and any other control relays to be released, thus the men come back on the playing field in their respective positions and the batter and pitcher are ready to make new selections and start a new play.

Assume the mixer stepping relay is resting on DOU 1 (double 1) instead of TRI. The circuit will still go to PAD 201. The A set of fingers will now illuminate lamps 29, 30, 31 and 32. At this point the circuit ends and will not illuminate 35, 36 and 37, instead the B set of fingers will illuminate 33 for a longer period of time to represent the catch of a bouncing ball, then illuminate 34, 29, 29a and 10. Lamp 34 represents the centerfielder throwing the ball back to the infield and is held illuminated until 10 is illuminated representing the short stop catching the throw in the infield. In case of the triple, the A set of fingers will illuminate 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 35, 36 and 37 representing the ball bouncing off the fence and going out into center field.

Assuming the fingers MFA are resting on home run 1 (HR 1), the circuit goes to PAD 202. The A fingers will illuminate lamps 43, 44, 45, representing the right and center fielders running back after a fly ball. The fingers will then illuminate 48, the home run lamp.

If the pitcher selected a Curve," Inside and the batter selected Curve, FIG. 5, the circuit 91a going into the pitchers switch will go thru contacts Ca on the batters switch and continue thru contacts C1 in the pitchers Type switch and becomes circuit (RT). The (RT) circuit then continues to the pitchers Inside Outside Strike switch, goes thru contacts N2 and comes out B. The B circuit goes directly to B relay (Play Control relay 2) FIG. 5. The B2 circuit coming from the B relay goes directly to the B section of the mixer stepping unit 1, FIG. 8. If the fingers MP8 on the B section of the disc are resting on SIN'Z, the circuit goes directly to play animation disc 203. The A fingers on disc 203 will illuminate lamps 38, 39, 40 and 41, then the B fingers will hold 41 for a longer period of time, then illuminate 38, 42 and S3 representing the bass being thrown back to the infield and caught by the second baseman. If the play had been DOU-2, the A fingers would have illuminated lamps 38, 39, 40, 41, 49, 50, 51, 52, 38 and 53, representing the ball bouncing out to the fence and being thrown backto the infield.

If the pitcher selected a Slider, STrike and the batter selected Curve, the circuit 91a going into the batter switch will go thru contacts Ca on the batter fingers on disc 202 will illuminate lamps 43, 44 and 45,

then the B fingers will illuminate 46, representing the right and center fielders running back after a fly ball and catching it.

If the pitcher selected a Fastball Outside and the batter selecteda Slider, the circuit 91a going into the batter switch will go thru contacts Sa in the batter switch up thru contacts F3 on the pitchers Type" switch and come out WR. The WR circuit goes over to the pitcher Inside, Strike, Outside switch, continues through contacts 02 and comes out D. The D circuit goes directly to the D relay, FIG. 5. The D2 circuit coming from the D relay goes directly to the D section of the Mixer Stepping Unit Disc 1 (FIG. 8). If the fingers MFD on the D section of the disc are resting on the fly-1 contact, the circuit goes directly to the pad No. 204, FIG. 9. The A fingers on PAD No. 204 will illuminatelamps 23, 24, 25 and 26 representing the short stop and left fielder running after a fly ball and catching it. If the fingers were resting on foul-2, the A set of fingers would illuminate 23, 24 and 25, then the B set of fingers would illuminate 27 and 28, representing the fielders running after a fly ball which dropped into foul territory.

If the pitcher and batter create a C or D situation and the fingers MFC or MFD are resting on inf-out, the resulting' plays will be determined automatically as outat-first (OAF), Double Play (DP), or Out-at-I-Iome (OAH) depending on the position of any men on base and the number of outs. 1) If there are no Outs and no Base-Runner on first base, the play will be out-atfirst. (2) If there are no Outs with a base-runner on first base but noton third base, the play will be a Double Play. (3) If there are no outs with base-runners on first and third bases, the play will be Out-atJ-Iome. (4) If there is one out with no base-runner on first base the play will be Out-at-First. (5) If there is one out with a base-runner on first base, the play will be a Double Play. (6) If there are two outs the play will be out at first. The inf-out circuit is divided into two parts, infout a and inf-out b, FIG. 8. The inf-out a circuit goes directly to disc 205 (FIG. 9) to illuminate lamps 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 to animate the ball bouncing thru the infield and caught by the third baseman. The inf-out b circuit goes directly to the out stepping unit (OSR), FIG. 11. If the A set of fingers are resting on 0 (no outs) the circuit denoted as 00 goes directly to the 1st base relay, FIG. 13. If the first base relay is in position 1 (pos 1), indicating no base-runner on first base, the circuit goes directly to energize the out at first relay-R7 (FIG. 7). The circuit OAF from the relay-R7 goes directly to the CAP section of disc 205 (FIG. 9). If the first base relay is in position 2 (pos 2) indicating a base-runner on first, the circuit 00 goesover to the third base relay. If the third base relay is in position 1 (pos l) indieating no base-runner on third base, the circuit goes directly to. energize the double play relay-R9 (FIG. 7). The circuit DP from relay R9 goes directly to the DP section of disc 205, FIG.9. If the third base relay is in position 2 (pos 2) indicating a base-runner on third base, the 00 circuit from the first. base relay will go directly to energize the out-at-home relay-Rll0. The circuit OAH' from the relay Rll0 goes directly to the OAH section of disc 206. If the A set of fingers are resting on I (one out), the circuit denoted as 011' goes di rectly to the first base relay, FIG. 13. If the first base relay is in position 1 (pos l), the 011 circuit goes to energize the out-at-first relay-R7. If the first base relay is in position 2 (pos 2), the 01 circuit goes to energize the double play relay-R9. If the A set of fingers are resting on 2 (two outs), the circuit denoted as 02 goes directly to out at first X relay-R8. The circuit OAF from the relay R7 goes directly to the OAF section of disc 205. If the play is OAF, the A fingers on disc 205 will illuminate lamps 54, l1, l2, l3, 14, I5, and 22, animating the ball being thrown to first base and caught by the first baseman. If the play is a double play, the B fingers on disc 205 will illuminate lamps 16, I7, I8, 19, 20, 21, and 22, animating the ball tossed to second base, caught by the second baseman, then thrown to first base and caught by the first baseman. If the play is OAH the A fingers on disc 206 will illuminate lamps 8, 7, 6 and 47, animating the ball being thrown to home plate and caught by the catcher.

If the batter elects not to swing, he leaves his swing lever switch (SLS) FIG. 5, in the No. 2 position. When the pitch finger PFI crosses the contact SWa on the pitch unit disc-ll, FIG. 6, circuit SW will be broken at position 3 on the swing lever switch (SLS), preventing the swing relay R1 from being energized. When finger PF]! crosses contact 91, the circuit. goes directly to normally closed'contacts on swing relay RI to Let Pass circuit LP. The let pass circuit LP coming from the swing relay R1 goes thru contacts on the int-walk relay R5 and directly to the pitchers Inside Outside STrike switch. Assume the pitcher selected Curve Outside. The circuit LP will go thru contacts04 and direct to energize the ball relay R4. When the ball relay R4 is energized, the source of current (CS), originating at the sac bunt relay R6 goes thru the circuit 200 to the ball relay R4 and out circuit 8A3 directly to the pitchers Inside Strike Outside switch and thru contacts 04 to the Outside light 206 on the playing field, FIG. 10. The circuit: TP from ball relay R4 goes directly to the pitchers Curve Fastball Slider switch thru contacts C4 and to the Curve light 201 on the playing field FIG. 10. When the tingers PFlll and PFl2 on the pitch disc 2, FIG. 6, cross contact 93, the circuit 93 goes thru contacts 93 on the sac bunt relay R6 over to the contacts 93 on the ball relay R4. The ball step-up circuit (BSU) from ball relay R4 goes to the ball stepping unit (BSR) FIG. 11, stepping it to position 1. The circuit 1 goes to the playing field, FIG. 10, to illuminate ball ll lamp. The circuit LPa from the sac bunt relay R6 goes thru the LPa contacts on the ball relay R4 directly to the LPA section on pitch unit disc ll, FIG. 6. When the fingers PFI and PF2 cross contacts 5, 4, 3, 2 they illuminate the ball being thrown back to the pitcher. If the pitcher selected a Slider," Strike the LP circuit coming from

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Classifications
U.S. Classification463/52, 273/237, 273/277
International ClassificationA63F7/06
Cooperative ClassificationA63F7/0608
European ClassificationA63F7/06A1