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Publication numberUS3790242 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 5, 1974
Filing dateJan 24, 1972
Priority dateJan 24, 1972
Publication numberUS 3790242 A, US 3790242A, US-A-3790242, US3790242 A, US3790242A
InventorsSullivan J
Original AssigneeMead Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Binder carrier and support structure
US 3790242 A
Abstract
A carrier for attachment to a binder, such as a binder for computer print-outs, and supporting structure for the carrier. The carrier includes a carrying handle, a first pair of hooks for engaging the binder posts without opening the binder, and a second set of hooks for engaging a rack. The handle includes an enlarged portion extending along an edge of the carrier and a cutout beneath the enlarged portion which can be used either to accomodate the fingers of a person holding the carrier or for engagement with a supporting rack. A specially designed support structure may be used with the carrier which includes a channel having inwardly directed, spaced side wall edges adapted to engage the enlarged portion of the carrier handle.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Sullivan 1 Feb. 5, 1974- BINDER CARRIER AND SUPPORT STRUCTURE [52] US. Cl. 312/184, 224/45 T [51] Int. Cl B421 15/04 [58] Field of Search. 224/45 P, 45 T, 45 W, 45 BA, 224/45 N, 45 Q, 46 R, 57; 211/94.5, 113;

Germany 211/113 909,931 7/1949 Germany 312/184 403,71 1 7/ 1966 Switzerland 934,562 8/1963 Great Britain 312/184 Primary Examiner-Gera1d M. Forlenza Assistant Examiner-Kenneth Noland Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Biebe1, French & Bugg [5 7] ABSTRACT A carrier for attachment to a binder, such as a binder for computer print-outs, and supporting structure for the carrier. The carrier includes a carrying handle, a first pair of hooks for engaging the binder posts without opening the binder, and a second set of hooks for engaging a rack. The handle includes an enlarged portion extending along an edge of the carrier and a cutout beneath the enlarged portion which can be used either to accomodate the fingers of a person holding the carrier or for engagement with a supporting rack. A specially designed support structure may be used with the carrier which includes a channel having inwardly directed, spaced side wall edges adapted to engage the enlarged portion of the carrier handle.

7 Claims, 10 Drawing Figures PAIENTEB 51974 sum 1 or z FIG-2 1 BINDER CARRIER AND SUPPORT STRUCTURE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The print-outs from high speed computers generally take the form of continuous webs of several, superim posed plies of paper and carbons having regularly spaced feed holes along their edges for engagement by drive sprockets. conventionally, these continuous webs are also perforated at regular intervals so that they may be separated or folded for convenience in handling and storage. For storage purposes a binder may be utilized which includes a pair of long, flexible posts made of nylon which may be inserted through aligned feed holes in the print-out sheets and bent over to secure the sheets in place.

In order to facilitate storage and handling of the binder various carrier structures have been proposed. One type, for example, comprises a substantially rectangular plate having an enlarged portion along one edge and a pair of holes formed adjacent the opposite edge. The binder posts are threaded through the holes and the enlarged portion of the carrier is engaged by a rack or other support structure.

It is desirable, however, for the carrier be approximately centered in the binder so that it will be balanced for handling and storage. Therefore, with a carrier of this type it is necessary, each time additional print-out sheets are added to the binder, to completely disassembly the carrier, remove the carrier and usually some of the print-out sheets, reposition them, and then, reassemble the binder with the new sheets added. This is obviously a time consuming operation.

After a period of time many print-outs may be relegated to inactive storage, where they may be simply stacked so that a carrier is unnecessary. At this time, therefore, it is desirable to remove the carrier for reuse with active files. Again, to do this with a conventional carrier it is necessary to disassemble the binder, remove a portion of the print-out sheets from the binder posts, remove the carrier, replace the removed sheets back in the binder and then reassemble the binder. As a practical matter clerical personnel may find this task too bothersome or time consuming and simply deposit the binders in inactive storage with the handles attached. Additionally, it will be seen that a carrier of the above construction is rather awkward to handle.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention provides a binder carrier which may be readily attached and detached from a binder without disassembly or removal of print-out sheets.

The carrier in accordance with the present invention includes a pair of hooks which are slipped between print-out sheets from the back of the binder into engagement with the binder posts. The carrier is also provided with a pair of surfaces along one edge which slope downwardly and lead into the post engaging hooks. These surfaces thus serve as camming surfaces to facilitate engagement and disengagement of these hooks with the binder posts.

To further facilitate engagement of the posts by the hooks, the carrier includes a central portion which separates the sheets and provides easy entry for the binder post engaging hooks. Additionally, the central portion, when the carrier is in engagement with the binder, is

positioned within the binder and provides additional stability during handling and storage.

The carrier also includes a pair of downwardly opening hooks projecting from each end of the carrier and adapted to engage the rails of a rack of either the angle or drop type file. To provide better seating of the downwardly opening books on the rack rails, the hooks are flaired at their bight portions to provide a greater seating area.

The carrier also comprises an enlarged portion along its upper edge and a cutout or opening extending approximately coextensively with the enlarged portion to serve as finger openings so that the binder and carrier may be handled much like a birefcase or satchel.

In some installations, such as where the racks are stacked vertically in a modular system, it will be apparent that the binders cannot be dropped into place from above, as in angle or drop files. In this type of system, therefore, downwardly opening channels having side walls terminating in spaced apart, inwardly directed side wall edges are used as supporting structures and the carriers may be slipped into place in these channels with the inwardly directed side walls thereof engaging the enlarged portion of the carrier.

In conjunction with this type of supporting structure a pair of plugs may be telescopically received in opposite ends of a tubular backing channel mounted above and extending coextensively with the carrier engaging channel. The outer ends of the plugs are provided with downwardly opening hooks adapted to engage complementary structures, such as rails, on a supporting rack, and the telescopic connection between the backing channel and the plugs permit some adjustment of the carrier to accommodate different rail spacing.

the enlarged portion of the-carrier is preferably semi circular in cross section, having a flat under edge. This 'not only provides a more aesthetically pleasing design but permits the carrier engaging channel to assume a lower profile. Additionally, a more positive engagement between the carrier and carrier channel is obtained.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a binder with the carrier of the present invention attached thereto;

FIG. 2 is a side view of the carrier; FIG. 3 is an end view thereof; FIG. 4 is a top view of one end of the carrier of FIG.

FIG. 5 is a view of the back of a print-out binder;

FIG. 6 is a view of a portion of a print-out binder and a carrier in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 7 is a viewsimilar to FIG. 6 showing a step in attaching the carrier to a binder;

FIG. 8 is a view similar to FIG. 7 but showing the final step in attaching the carrier to a binder;

FIG. 9 is a portion of one end of a binder, the carrier and supporting structure therefor; and

FIG. 10 is an exploded perspective view of a portion of the structure of FIG. 9.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT As it will be noted from FIG. 1 of the drawings, the carrier 10 of the present invention is intended for use with a binder of the type typified by a computer printout binder. A binder of this type includes covers 12,

backing strips 14 and, as best seen in FIG. 5, a pair of flexible binder posts 16 constructed of nylon or some similar tough, flexible material.

The computer print-out sheets will have a series of feed holes 18 formed along each of their edges and the binder posts 16, as best seen in FIGS. 6 through 8 of the drawings, are inserted through aligned feed holes an then bent over to bind the computer print-out sheets between the backing strips 14 and covers 12.

The carrier of the present invention, which is particularly adapted to be used with a binder of the type described above, is best shown, per se, in FIGS. 2 through 4 of the drawings, and, includes a main body section having a central portion 20 and a pair of end portions 22. The central portion 20 is of considerably greater depth than the end portions, for a purpose to be described below, and is provided with an enlargement 24 along an upper edge and a cutout 26 extending substantially coextensively therewith.

Extending downwardly from the end portions 22 are a pair of hooks 28, each of which includes a shank portion 30, a bight portion 32 and return portions 34, the latter terminating in spaced relationship to the body of the carrier, and portions of the lower edge of the carrier slope downwardly into each of the hooks 28 to provide camming surfaces 36.

Projecting from each end of the carrier is a downwardly opening hook 38 having a bight portion 40. The hooks 38, as best seen in FIGS. 3 and 4 of the drawings, flare outwardly to provide a width at the bight portions thereof approximately three times the width of the main body of the carrier.

It will also be noted from FIGS. 1, 3 and 10 of the drawings that the enlarged portion 24 is preferably semicircular in cross section, including a flat upper surface 42 extending longitudinally thereof.

With the above structure and with reference to FIGS. 6 and 8 of the drawings, it will be seen that the carrier 10 is readily attached to a binder without disassembly thereof and removal of the pages therefrom. Thus, the carrier 10 may be moved initially in the direction of the arrow A in FIG. 6 of the drawings, allowing the wide central portion 20 of the carrier to slide between the print-out sheets, separating them and facilitating the entry of the hooks 28.

As the central portion and hooks 28 slide between the print-out sheets, the camming surfaces 36 will engage the binder posts 16 at a point thereon to the right of the hooks 28. Thereafter the carrier is moved to the right, as indicated by the arrow B in FIG. 7 of the drawings, causing the carrier to move upwardly as the posts 16 slide along the camming surfaces until they reach the shank portions 30 of the hooks. The carrier is then moved in the direction indicated by the arrow C in FIG. 8 of the drawings, to cause the posts to be engaged by the bight portion 32 of the hooks.

With the carrier thus attached, the binder and printout sheets may be carried, much like a briefcase or satchel, with the enlarged portion 24 and cutout 26 serving as a handle. Additionally, the binder may be stored on a conventional rack-of either the angle or drop type, with the downwardly opening hooks 38 engaging the spaced rails of the rack. When so stored it will be seen that the flared portions of the hooks 38 provide greater seating area and, hence, greater stability.

Regardless of whether the binder is carried manually or stored, it will be seen that the central portion 20 of the carrier is positioned well within the binder, so that, in addition to serving as a spreader to facilitate entry of the hooks between the print-out sheets, the engagement of the central portion within the binder prevents the carrier from bending longitudinally thereof and allowing the hooks 28 to disengage.

While the hooks 38 are suited for storing the binders with carriers attached in angle or drop files, it will be apparent that their use is impractical where vertically stacked, modular racks or files are used, since there is no access from the top of the files. When utilizing files of this type, therefore, a support structure of the type shown in FIGS. 9 and 10 of the drawings may be utilized. Such support structure includes a carrier engaging channel 44 having inwardly directed side walls 46 terminating in spaced side wall edges 48, which cooperate to define a longitudinally extending slot. The channel 44 is of complementary configuration to the enlarged portion 24, thereby providing a lower profile and a more aesthetically pleasing appearance.

Mounted on the carrier channel 44 and extending longitudinally thereof is a backing channel 50, which may be of rectangular configuration as shown. Telescopically received in each end of the backing channel 50 is a plug member 52 terminating in a downwardly opening hook 54. The telescopic engagement between the members 50 and 52 permits some longitudinal adjustment of the spacing between the hook 54, as indicated by the arrows in FIGS. 9 and 10 of the drawings, so that some variation in the spacing between the rails of the racks may be accommodated.

It will also be seen that, while the cutout 26 is intended primarily to serve as a convenience in handling, it also permits the binders to be stored with supporting structure received through the cutouts.

From the above it will be apparent that the present invention provides a carrier readily adapted for handling and storage of print-out binders, and which may be quickly and easily attached to a binder without time consuming diassembly and assembly to the binder.

While the form of apparatus herein described constitutes a preferred embodiment of the invention, it is to be understood that the invention is not limited to this precise form of apparatus, and that changes may be made therein without departing from the scope of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. A binder carrier comprising:

a. a planar main body section having a central portion and a pair of end portions,

b. means defining an enlargement projecting out of the plane of said central portion along an upper edge thereof,

0. means defining an opening through said central portion beneath said enlargement,

d. a pair of post hooks formed on said end portions and opening upwardly toward said upper edge of said central portion,

e. a pair of support engaging hooks positioned outwardly of said post engaging hooks and opening downwardly away from said upper edge of said central portion,

f. bight portions of said support engaging hooks being of substantially greater thickness than said planar main body section to provide greater stability between said support engaging hooks and supports engaged thereby,

g. portions of said main body section extending downwardly past bight portions of said post engag ing hooks to be received within a binder carried by said carrier.

2. A binder carrier comprising:

a. a substantially planar main body section,

b. a pair of upwardly opening post hooks extending downwardly from said main body section,

c. said post hooks including:

i. shank portions projecting downwardly from said main body section in spaced parallel relationship to each other, 7

ii. bight portions extending from their respective shank portions in the same direction and adapted to engage spaced binder posts,

iii. return portions extending from their respective bight portions in the same direction upwardly toward said main body section and terminating spaced therefrom d. support engaging hooks disposed outwardly of said post engaging hooks and opening downwardly, oppositely to said post engaging hooks to engage a support for supporting said carrier with a binder attached thereto, and

e. a pair of camming surfaces extending from a base of each of said shank portions over the bight portion associated therewith and sloping upwardly away from both said bases of said shank portions and said post hook bight portions in substantially parallel relationship to each other.

3. A binder carrier comprising:

a. a substantially planar main body section,

b. a pair of upwardly opening post hooks extending downwardly from said main body section,

c. said post hooks including:

i. shank portions projecting downwardly from said main body section in spaced parallel relationship to each other,

ii. bight portions extending from their respective shank portions in the same direction and adapted to engage spaced binder posts, and

iii. return portions extending from their respective bight portions in the same direction upwardly toward said main body section and terminating spaced therefrom, and

d. said main body section including an entry portion projecting downwardly thereform in the same direction as said post hooks past said bight portions thereof, said e. support engaging hooks disposed outwardly of said post engaging hooks and opening downwardly, oppositely to said post engaging hooks, for engaging a support for supporting said carrier with a binder attached thereto.

4. A binder carrier comprising:

. an elongated, substantially planar main section,

. said main section including a relatively wide central portion and a pair of relatively narrow end portions,

c. an enlarged portion formed integrally with said central portion projecting out of the plane thereof along an upper edge thereof and having a substantially flat outer surface,

d. means defining a finger accommodating opening through said central portion beneath said enlarged portion,

e. a pair of planar, post engaging hook sections formed integrally and coplanar with said main section and projecting downwardly therefrom away from said upper edge thereof at said end portions of said main section,

f. said hook sections opening upwardly in the same direction toward said upper edge of said main section and including:

i. downwardly projecting shank portions extending from said end portions in spaced parallel relationship to each other,

ii. bight portions extending in the same direction from their respective shank portions and adapted to engage spaced posts of a binder, and

iii. return portions extending from their respective bight portions upwardly toward said upper edge of said main section and terminating spaced therefrom,

g. a pair of camming surfaces extending from a base of each of said shank portions over the bight portion associated therewith,

h. each of said camming surfaces sloping upwardly away from both said bases of said shank portions and said bight portions in substantially parallel relationship to each other, and

i. a pair of planar, support engaging hooks projecting outwardly from opposite ends of said main section at said end portions thereof and opening downwardly away from said upper edge of said main sections.

5. A binder carrier and support therefore comprising:

a. a carrier having:

i. a main body section,

ii. a pair of spaced hooks extending from one side of said main body section and opening in the same direction, and

iii. an enlarged portion extending along a side of said main section opposite said one side,

b. a carrier channel having inwardly directed side walls terminating in spaced side wall edges defining a longitudinally extending slot,

c. said carrier being supported by said carrier channel with said enlarged portion received therein and engaging interior surfaces of said side walls and said main body section depending therefrom,

d. a backing channel extending longitudinally of said carrier channel, and

e. a pair of plugs telescopically received in opposite ends of said backing channel and terminating in hooks disposed outwardly of said opposite ends and opening downwardly toward said carrier channel 6. A binder carrier comprising:

a. an elongated, substantially planar main section,

b. said main section including a realtively wide central portion and a pair of relatively narrow end portions,

0. a pair of upwardly opening post engaging hook sections formed integrally and coplanar with said main section and projecting downwardly therefrom away from an upper edge thereof at said end portions of said main section,

d. a pair of planar, support engaging hooks projecting outwardly from opposite ends of said main section ii. bight portions extending from their respective shank portions in the same direction and adapted to engage spaced binder posts, and

iii. return portions extending upwardly in the same direction from their respective bight portions,

d. support engaging hooks disposed outwardly of said post engaging hooks and opening downwardly, op-

positely to said post engaging hooks for engaging a support for supporting said carrier with a binder attached thereto, and

e. portions of said main body section extending downwardly past said bight portions of said post hooks to facilitate separation of sheets in said binder and provide stability during handling and storage

Patent Citations
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US2397880 *Aug 30, 1940Apr 2, 1946Gardner Richardson CoCarrying means for containers
US2455478 *Dec 19, 1946Dec 7, 1948Grant Watson RCombined coat hanger and necktie rack
US2613769 *Jun 24, 1948Oct 14, 1952Joseph StaffaDress separator for wardrobe trunks or suitcases
US3302837 *May 20, 1965Feb 7, 1967Montgomery Jack RFish carrier
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3857492 *Mar 15, 1973Dec 31, 1974Swingline IncLoose leaf binder storage system
US3936201 *Jul 18, 1974Feb 3, 1976Standard Manifold CompanyHanger and sheet lifter for ring binder
US3950048 *Jul 10, 1974Apr 13, 1976Swingline, Inc.Carrying and support handle for binders
US3957321 *Sep 23, 1974May 18, 1976Acco International Inc.Suspension file folder
US3977527 *Dec 17, 1974Aug 31, 1976Acco International Inc.Frame for suspension of data binders
US4124261 *Mar 18, 1977Nov 7, 1978Fellowes Manufacturing CompanyData storage unit
US4674637 *Aug 24, 1984Jun 23, 1987Dahle Design Ltd.Documents filing systems
US4842435 *Feb 8, 1988Jun 27, 1989Tab Products CompanyAdjustable document handle
US4893714 *Feb 19, 1988Jan 16, 1990Seima Italiana SpaSupport for print-outs
US4958795 *Jun 13, 1989Sep 25, 1990Alpia S.A.Fitting for the sorting of plans in a vertical filing cabinet
US5104167 *Oct 31, 1990Apr 14, 1992Nemeth Stephen RBook holder
US6227746Aug 28, 1998May 8, 2001Acco Brands, Inc.Hanging data binder
US7954694Feb 21, 2008Jun 7, 2011Ideastream Consumer Product, LLCFile folder
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US9156303Oct 28, 2013Oct 13, 2015Ideastream Consumer Products, LlcFile Folder
US9573408 *Oct 23, 2007Feb 21, 2017Lsc Communications Us, LlcResilient rod feature in hanging file folder
US20030077108 *Oct 18, 2002Apr 24, 2003Shlomo MenahemLoose leaf folder
US20080197176 *Feb 21, 2008Aug 21, 2008Decarlo Anthony JFile folder
US20090101605 *Oct 23, 2007Apr 23, 2009Esselte CorporationResilient rod feature in hanging file folder
US20100150641 *Mar 7, 2008Jun 17, 2010Stephane WilpartMulti-function element from a system for the filling or the storage of an article
US20110226844 *Jun 2, 2011Sep 22, 2011Ideastream Consumer Products, LlcFile folder
USD622320Dec 21, 2007Aug 24, 2010Ideastream Consumer Products, LlcFile folder
USD759161 *May 19, 2014Jun 14, 2016Ideastream Consumer Products, LlcFile folder
EP1967385A3 *Mar 7, 2008Aug 19, 2009Visu-ADMulti-function element from a system for the filling or the storage of an article
WO1990000982A1 *Jul 17, 1989Feb 8, 1990Acco World CorporationSpine support attachable to storage device including ring binder
WO2008142573A2 *Mar 7, 2008Nov 27, 2008Visu-AdMulti-function element from a system for the filling or the storage of an article
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Classifications
U.S. Classification312/184, 402/4, 294/145, 229/67.2, 294/137, 294/170, 294/142
International ClassificationB42F15/00
Cooperative ClassificationB42F15/0058
European ClassificationB42F15/00C4B
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Sep 8, 1986ASAssignment
Owner name: ESSELTE BOORUM & PEASE INC.
Free format text: MERGER;ASSIGNORS:EBS DEVELOPMENT CORP. (MERGED INTO);BOORUM & PEASE INC. (CHANGED TO);REEL/FRAME:004616/0546
Effective date: 19851031
Owner name: ESSELTE PENDAFLEX CORPORATION
Free format text: MERGER;ASSIGNORS:ESSELTE BOORUM & PEASE INC.;ESSELTE PENDAFLEX CORPORATION, (MERGED INTO);ESSELTE BOORUM & PEASE INC, (CHANGED INTO);REEL/FRAME:004616/0555
Effective date: 19851223