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Publication numberUS3791382 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 12, 1974
Filing dateApr 4, 1972
Priority dateApr 4, 1972
Also published asCA1005302A1
Publication numberUS 3791382 A, US 3791382A, US-A-3791382, US3791382 A, US3791382A
InventorsCollins R
Original AssigneeKendall & Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Waterproof body coverings with fluid receiving pockets
US 3791382 A
Abstract
A surgical drape having a main sheet for placement on a patient's body for performing a surgical procedure. The drape has at least one pocket on the outer surface of the main sheet to receive fluid runoff from the site of surgical procedure.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Collins Feb. 12, 1974 1 1 WATERPROOF BODY COVERINGS WITH FLUID RECEIVING POCKETS [75] Inventor: Robert F. Collins, Barrington, I11.

[73] Assignee: The Kendall Company, Walpole,

Mass.

22 Filed: Apr. 4, 1972 21 Appl.No.:240,914

Related US. Application Data [63] Continuation-impart of Ser. No. 37,637, May 15,

1970, abandoned.

[52] US. Cl 128/132 D [51] Int. Cl. A6lf 13/00, A6lf 13/18, A611 15/00 58] Field o1Search...;.... .....i..: 128/132, 132D 2/247, DIG. 5, DIG. 7

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,364,928 l/1968 Creager et a1. 128/132 D 3,503,391 3/1970 Melges 128/132 D 3,030,957 4/1962 Melges 128/132 D X 2,775,770 1/1957 Keller 2/247 3,561,439 2/1971 Bayer.... 128/132 D 273,115 2/1883 Maguire Z/DIG. 1

FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 299,004 7/1929 Great Britain Z/DIG. 5

Primary Examiner-Lawrence Charles Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Powell L. Sprunger [57] ABSTRACT A surgical drape having a main sheet for placement on a patients body for performing a surgical, procedure. The drape has at least one pocket on the outer surface of the main sheet to receive fluid runoff from the site of surgical procedure.

30 Claims, 17 Drawing Figures PATENIEBFEB 1 21914 SHEET 1 0F 2 INVENTOK.

PATENTEB 2'974 3.791.382

SHED 2 0? 2 mjw QQK-

WATERPROOF EDDY COVERINGS WITH FLUID RECEIVING POCKETS CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION This is a Continuation-in-Part of copending application Ser. No. 37,637, filed May 15, 1970, now abandoned.

This invention relates to improvements in articles of surgical apparel, and more particularly to surgical drapes.

It is the primary object of the invention to provide an improvement in articles of surgical apparel whereby the random and unchecked runoff of blood and other fluid, present in a surgical procedure, may be controlled.

According to the invention there is provided a drape for performing a surgical procedure on a patients body. The drape has a main sheet for placement on the patients body, and at least one pocket is located on the outer surface of the main sheet in the expected path of fluid runoff from the site of surgical procedure. The pocket has a pouch and an upper edge defining an opening which communicates with the pouch, and the opening faces toward the surgical site to receive fluid runoff in the pouch. In one embodiment of the invention the pocket incorporates pleats to increase its fluid retentive capacity. In another embodiment an absorbent material is positioned in the pouch to retain fluid in the pocket. The main sheet is folded in one form of the invention to define the pocket, and in another embodiment a reinforcement sheet is secured to the outer surface of the main sheet, with the reinforcement sheet being folded to define the pocket.

Other objects, features, and advantages will appear from the following description of a preferred embodiment, taken together with the attached drawings thereof, in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a surgical drape suitable for abdominal surgery constructed according to the invention;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view showing details of the pocket structure of the drape of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a sectional view taken substantially as indicated'along the line 3-3 of FIG. 2; and

FIG. 4 is a side elevational view illustrating an alternative embodiment of the improved drape as used in conjunction with an obstetrical or lithotomy procedure;

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of another embodiment of the present invention in which a reinforcement sheet is folded to define a pair of pockets;

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary sectional view taken substantially as indicated along the line 6-6 of FIG. 5, and showing a folded absorbent sheet in the pockets;

FIG. 7 is a fragmentary sectional view of the drape of FIG. 5 showing an absorbent filler positioned in a pocket of the drape;

FIG. 8 is a fragmentary sectional view of the drape of FIG. 5 showing an absorbent sheet secured to the inside of a pocket of the drape;

FIG. 9 is a fragmentary perspective view of the drape of FIG. 5, showing an upper edge of a pocket secured to the drape intermediate the ends of the pocket;

FIG. 10 is a perspective view of another embodiment of the present invention in which a main sheet of the drape is folded to define a pair of pockets;

FIG. 11 is a fragmentary sectional view taken substantially as indicated along the line 11-11 of FIG. 10;

FIG. 12 is a fragmentary plan view of another embodiment of a drape of the present invention for use in lithotomy or obstetrical procedures;

FIG. 13 is a fragmentary sectional view taken substantially as indicated along the line 13-13 of FIG. 12;

FIG. 14 is a fragmentary plan view of another embodiment of a drape of the invention for use in lithotomy or obstetrical procedures;

FIG. 15 is a fragmentary sectional view taken substantially as indicated along the line 15-15 of FIG. 14;

FIG. 16 is a fragmentary sectional view of another embodiment of the invention; and

FIG. 17 is a fragmentary sectional view of another embodiment of the invention.

As shown in FIG. 1, a patient for abdominal surgery is draped with a surgical drape 10 having an appropriately located fenestration 12 for access to the site of surgery. The drape 10 may be either a customary cloth drape or a disposable drape comprising a fluid impervious or fluid repellent sheet. The drape 10 has a fluidtrapping pocket structure 14 on the outer surface of a main sheet which is located at a level below the level of the fenestration 12 when the sheet is draped o'ver the patient. The pocket 14 is spaced from the fenestration 12 and is positioned in the expected path of fluid runoff from the fenestration. (If fluid runoff can be anticipated toward both sides of the fenestration 12, as shown in the FIG. 1, a pocket structure 14 may be provided on both sides of the sheet 10.)

Various alternative featuresof the pocket 14 may be described with relation to the detailed views of FIS. 2 and 3. The pocket structure 14 is basically a sheet 16 which is attached to the drape 10 along its side edges 18 and in its lower region 20. The sheet 16 may comprise either absorbent or nonabsorbent materials (e.g., plastic, cloth, paper, cellulosic material, etc.). In the case of a disposable surgical drape-l0 which comprises a fluid impervious plastic material, the sheet 16 may conveniently be of the same material as the drape 10 itself.

The sheet 16 may be attached to the drape 10 in any conventional fashion suitable for the material chosen; including sewing, gluing, or heat sealing.

As best seen in FIG. 3, the bottom edge 21 of thesheet 16 is preferably folded under before attachment of lower region 20 to the drape 10. This arrangement helps insure that the pocket structure 14 will automatically assume an open configuration, with the top or upper edge 22 of sheet 16 spaced apart'from the drape 10, when the drape is spread over the patient.

An additional feature which also will help to insure such an open configuration is the pleating of the sheet 16. Such pleating may be located at the side edges 18 and at various points along the length of the pocket structure 14. Representative pleats are indicated in FIG. 2 with the tuck pleats 24 and 28 and the box pleat 26. The two folds of the box pleat 26, as shown in FIG. 2, are disposed toward the surface of the first or main sheet, inwardly toward the cavity or pouch of the pocket defined by the first and second sheets. The panel section of the box pleat which is between the two folds is therefore spaced from the surface of the first sheet by a distance at least equal to the thickness of two plies of the second sheet.

Although it is desired to have the upper edge 22 of the sheet 16 spaced apart from the drape when the drape is in use, if the material of which the pocket structure 14 is constructed lacks stiffness the presence of pleats may cause the pocket structure to sag to the point where trapped fluid spills over the top edge 22 of the sheet 16. To avoid this, spots 30 or lines 32 may be provided where the sheet 16 is attached to the underlying drape 10. It is to be noted that the aforesaid panel section of the box pleat 26, as shown in FIG. 2, is secured to the surface of the first sheet at a point below the top edge 22 of the sheet 16. With the panel of the box pleat secured to the first sheet at this point, the box pleat at the top edge 22 can open up to provide a funnel-like opening facing in the direction of the expected fluid runoff.

It should also be noted that horizontal pleats may be substituted for the vertical pleats shown in FIG. 2 to provide a pocket structure in which the top edge 22 of sheet 16 assumes an open configuration when the drape 10 is placed over the patient.

If the fluid runoff is expected in an amount that would cause spillage from the pocket structure (e.g., from the pressure of a surgeons body) or difficulty in handling the drape for disposal at the conclusion of the procedure, an absorbent material may be provided inside the pocket structure to aid in the positive retention of the fluid trapped. Absorbent material 33 may be constructed as an integral part of the inside facing 34 (see FIG. 3) of the pocket or may be a separate absorbent body placed inside the structure at the time of the use of the drape or during the drape construction. The placement of such an absorbent within the pocket structure 14 would, of course, also help to insure that the top edge 22 of sheet 16 remains spaced apart from the drape 10 so that all fluid runoff is collected in the pocket structure 14.

Control of fluid runoff may be desirable when absorption or containment is not practical due to the large quantity of fluid. Such occasion might arise, for example, in an obstetrical, abdominal, or lithotomy procedure. In such a case, as shown in FIG. 4, the pocket structure 14 may be provided with an opening 36 in the lower part of the sheet 16. The opening 36 may be formed by leaving an area at the desired position unattached to the underlying drape 10 or by cutting a fenestration (as in FIG. 4) at the desired position. A receptacle 38 may be placed directly below the opening 36 to collect the channeled fluid.

The construction shown in FIG. 4 also incorporates a chevron-shape of the pocket structure 14 to assure proper flow to the location of the opening in the pocket structure.

Another embodiment of the invention is illustrated in FIGS. 5 and 6, in which the drape 110 has a main sheet 150 for placement on the patients body and a reinforcement sheet 152 secured to the main sheet 150. The main sheet 150 has a pair of side edges 154a and 154b, a pair of end edges 156a and 156b connecting the side edges 154a and b, a fenestration 158, an inner surface 160 for contacting the patients body after placement of the drape, and an outer surface 162 facing away from the patients body after placement of the drape.

The reinforcement sheet 152 shown is rectangular and is secured to the outer surface 162 of the main sheet 150 by adhesive, or other suitable means. The reinforcement sheet 152 has a fenestration 163 in registration with the fenestration 158 of the main sheet 150, a pair of side edges 164a and l64b intermediate the fenestrations 158 and 163 and the side edges 154a and b of the main sheet 150, and a pair of end edges 166a and 166b intermediate the fenestrations 158 and 163 and the end edges 156a and b of the main sheet 150. The reinforcement sheet 152 has a pair of generally aligned transverse fold lines 170a and 172a intermediate the fenestrations and the side edge 1540 of the main sheet 150, and a pair of generally aligned transverse fold lines 170 b and 172b intermediate the fenestrations and the other side edge 15412 of the main sheet 150. The fold lines extend between the end edges 166a and b of the reinforcement sheet 152, and the pairs of generally aligned fold lines define corresponding tucks 174a and 174b. The tucks 174a and b are secured to the reinforcement sheet by lines of adhesive 176, or other suitable means, on opposite sides of the fenestrations to define a pair of fluid receiving pockets 178a and 178b. The pockets 178a and b have corresponding outer flaps 180a and 18Gb terminating in associated upper edges 182a and 182b which define openings 184a and 18 1b communicating with pouches 186a and 186b in the pockets and facing toward the fenestrations to receive runoff fluid from the fenestrations in the pouches 186a and b.

Preferably, the pockets are positioned relatively closer to the fenestrations than shown in FIG. 1, and may be positioned on the drape with the upper edges spaced approximately 2 to 10 inches from the fenestrations. Accordingly, the portion of the drape below the upper edge would be maintained essentially in a dry condition since fluid is collected in the pockets, and wetting of the surgeons gown below the upper edges is prevented. Pockets having a depth of from 2 to 5 inches have been found generally suitable for containing the runoff fluid.

As discussed above, an absorbent material may be placed in the pockets to widen the openings 184a and b and to retain runoff fluid in the pouches 186a and b. Thus, the absorbent material prevents squeezing out of fluid from the pouches 186a and b in the event that a surgeon or physician leans against or applies pressure to the flaps 180a and b of the pockets 178a and b. Also, the absorbent material prevents spilling out of fluid from the pockets when the drape is removed from the patient after an operation. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 6, the absorbent material comprises a pair of absorbent sheets 133a and 133b, such as cellulosic wadding or woven and nonwoven materials, which are positioned in the pouches of the pockets. The sheets may be rolled or folded in some manner, and are shown in FIG. 6 as being folded about fold lines 188a and 188b, with the sheets being positioned in the pouches with the fold lines 1880 and b facing toward the fenestrations 158 and 163.

Another example of the absorbent material 133b is shown in FIG. 7, in which an absorbent filler material, such as cellulosic foam, surgical sponges and pads, a cellulose wadding, cotton fibers, or an absorbent woven or nonwoven fabric, is positioned in the pouch 186b of the pocket 1781). In FIG. 8, an absorbent sheet l33b is secured to the inside of the pocket 1781), and covers at least a portion of the inside of the pocket.

As shown in FIG. 9, the upper edges 182 of the pockets 178 may be secured to the reinforcement sheet 152 at points 190 by adhesive, or other suitable means, intermediate the ends of the pockets, if it is desirable to maintain relatively narrow openings, such as 184b, in the pockets.

Another embodiment of the invention is illustrated in FIGS. and 11, in which pockets are formed in the main sheet 250 of the drape 210. The main sheet 210 has a pair of side edges 254a and b, a pair of end edges 256a and b connecting the side edges 254a and b, a fenestration 258, an inner surface 260, and an outer surface 262. The main sheet 250 has a pair of generally aligned longitudinal fold lines 270a and 27211 intermediate the fenestration 258 and the side edge 254a, and a pair of generally aligned longitudinal fold lines 2711b and 27217 intermediate the fenestration and the side edge 25412. The pairs of fold lines are preferably aligned with the nearest side edge, and define corresponding tucks 274a and 274b in the main sheet. Each of the tucks 274a and b is secured to the main sheet by adhesive lines 276, or other suitable means, to define corresponding pockets 278a and 2781) for receiving runoff fluid from the fenestration 258. The pockets 278a and b have corresponding openings 184a and l84b through which the runoff fluid is received in the pockets. Preferably, the ends of the tucks 274a and b are secured to the main sheet by suitable means, such as adhesive lines 292, and the outer edge of the tucks intermediate the adhesive lines 276 and 292 may be secured to the main sheet by means, such as adhesive lines 294. If desired, an absorbent material may be placed in the pockets as described above.

The tail sheets of drapes which are designed for lithotomy procedures, such as vaginal hysterectomy, are shown in FIGS. 12-15, with pockets in the tail sheets having a structure similar to that described in connection with the drapes of FIGS. 5-11. As illustrated in FIGS. 12 and 13, the drape 310 has a reinforcement sheet 352 secured to a main sheet 350, and the reinforcement sheet 352 has a fenestration 363 in registration with a fenestration 350 in the main sheet 350. The reinforcement sheet 352 also has a pair of transverse fold lines 370 and 372 defining a tuck 374 which may be secured to the reinforcement sheet by adhesive lines 376, preferably on opposite sides of the fenestrations. The secured tuck thus forms a pocket 378 having a pouch 386 and opening 384 facing the fenestrations, in a manner similar to the drape l 10 described in connection with FIGS. 5 and 6.

The drape 410 shown in FIGS. 14 and 15 has a tuck 474 defined in a main sheet 450 by a pair of transverse fold lines 470 and 472, in a manner similar to the drape 210 described in connection with FIGS. 10 and 11. The tuck 474 may be secured to the main sheet 450 by adhesive lines 476 to form a pocket 478, as described above. If desired, the drapes shown in FIGS. 1215 may also contain an absorbent material in the pouches of their pockets.

Thus, there has been described in the specification a surgical drape having a pocket or pockets to receive runoff fluid from the surgical site. The drape of the present invention maintains the outer surface of the drape in a dry condition throughout substantial areas of the drape, and prevents fluid from running off the drape onto the surgeons gown or shoes and the floor. For example, the laparotomy drape of the present invention provides improved asepsis since the'liquid containment within the pockets helps eliminate the runoff wetting through the surgeons gown in the chest, abdomen and portions of the underarm area normally resulting from contact with conventional drapes.

It has been found that the pockets on the drapes of the present invention provide a convenient device for retaining such items as suction tubing and a cautery cord leading to a Bovie gun, which is utilized to seal off bleeding cappilaries, during the course of an operation.

The applicants invention also helps to alleviate another difficulty which faces the surgical team. After completion of a surgical procedure it is necessary to account for all of the sponges utilized during the operation to insure that none are inadvertently left in the in cision. Occasionally, such sponges, and particularly very small sponges, such as neuro patti sponges used in lamenectomy procedures, run off conventional drapes onto the floor, and may become lodged on the bottom of the surgeons shoes. Accordingly, at times it becomes difficult to locate all of the sponges. However, when utilizing the drapes of the present invention, the pockets on the drapes will usually catch such sponges which might otherwise fall off the drapes, and, if desired, the surgeon or nurse can place used sponges in the pockets during the operation. After the operation is complete, the sponges retained in the pockets may be readily counted by simply removing them from the pockets.

Embodiments of the invention which facilitate retrieval of such sponges from the pockets are illustrated in FIGS. 16 and 17. When the sponges run into the pockets, often they will have already assumed a bloodred color due to the fluid they contain, and it is desirable to provide a color contrast in the pockets to aid in locating the sponges in the collected fluid or adjacent the absorbent material which may also assume a bloodred tint. Accordingly, there is shown in FIG. 16 a drape 510 having a reinforcement sheet 552 secured. to a main sheet 550 and defining a pocket 578. A liquid permeable, non-absorbent, liner 592, such as a non-woven or a perforated plastic sheet, is secured inside the pouch 586 of the pocket by suitable means, such as adhesive, and the liner 592 preferably has a color which contrasts with the expected color of the sponges S. The sponges S are captured inside the permeable liner 592, which retains its original color due to its permeability and non-absorbability, and the sponges S are relatively easy to locate due to the color contrast against the liner 592.

In FIG. 17 a similar drape 610 is shown having an absorbent sheet 633 secured to the inside of the pocket 678, and a liquid permeable, non-absorbent, liner 692 of contrasting color is secured inside the absorbent sheet 633 in the pouch 686 of the pocket 678. The liner 692 permits wicking through of liquid to the absorbent sheet, while preventing the sponges S from contacting the absorbent sheet 633, and thus aids in locating the sponges due to the color contrast. If desired, the liner 692 may be secured to the absorbent sheet 633 throughout the pocket.

The foregoing detailed description is given for clearness of understanding only, and no unnecessary limitations should be understood therefrom as modifications will be obvious to those skilled in the art.

I claim:

1. A drape for performing a surgical procedure on a patients body, comprising:

a main sheet for placement over the patients body, said main sheet having a pair of side edges, a pair of end edges connecting the side edges, a fenestration, an inner surface for contacting the patients body after placement of the drape, and an outer surface facing away from the patients body after placement of the drape; and

a pair of pockets on the outer surface of said main sheet, each of said pockets being spaced from the site of surgical procedure and being positioned in termediate said fenestration and one of said side edges in the expected path of fluid runoff from the surgical site during the surgical procedure, and each of said pockets having a pouch and an upper edge defining an opening communicating with said pouch, with said openings facing toward the surgical site and being sufficiently wide to receive fluid runoff in said pouches.

2. The drape of claim 1 wherein the upper edges of the pockets are spaced from two to ten inches from the fenestration.

3. The drape of claim 1 wherein the depth of said pockets is from two to five inches.

4. The drape of claim 1 including an absorbent material positioned in said pouches.

5. The drape of claim 1 wherein said upper edges is secured to the drape at at least one point intermediate the ends of the upper.

6. A drape for performing a surgical procedure on a patients body, comprising:

a main sheet for placement on the patients body, said main sheet having a pair of side edges, a pair of end edges connecting the side edges, a fenestration, an inner surface for contacting the patients body after placement of the drape, and an outer surface facing away from the patients body after placement of the drape; and

a reinforcement sheet having a fenestration and secured to the outer surface of the main sheet with the fenestrations of the main and reinforcement sheets in registration, said reinforcement sheet having a pair of generally aligned fold lines defining a pocket on the outer surface of said main sheet, said pocket being spaced from the site of surgical pro cedure and being positioned in the expected path of fluid runoff from the surgical site during the surgical procedure, and said pocket having a pouch and an upper edge defining an opening communicating with said'pouch, with said opening facing toward the surgical site to receive fluid runoff in said pouch.

7. A drape for performing a surgical procedure on a patients body, comprising:

a main sheet for placement on the patients body, said main sheet having a pair of side edges, a pair of end edges connecting the side edges, an inner surface for contacting the patients body after placement of the drape, and an outer surface facing away from he patients body after placement of the drape; and

at least one pocket on the outer surface of said main sheet, said pocket being spaced from the site of surgical procedure and being positioned in the expected path of fluid runoff from the surgical site during the surgical procedure, and said pocket having a pouch and an outer flap terminating in an upper edge defining an opening communicating with said pouch, with said opening facing toward the surgical site to receive fluid runoff in said pouch, with said flap having at least one pleat to increase the fluid gathering capacity of the pocket.

8. The drape of claim 7 wherein said pocket includes a pair of end edges, and said flap includes a tuck pleat adjacent the end edges of the pocket.

9. The drape of claim 7 wherein said flap has a box pleat in which the fold lines thereof extend to the upper edge of the pocket and in which the two pleat folds of the box pleat are disposed inwardly toward said pouch.

10. The drape of claim 9 wherein said box pleat has a panel section intermediate said pleat folds, and said panel section is secured to the drape at a point removed from said upper edge.

11. A drape for performing a surgical procedure on a patients body, comprising:

a main sheet for placement on the patients body, said main sheet having a pair of side edges, a pair of end edges connecting the side edges, an inner surface for contacting the patients body after placement of the drape, and an outer surface facing away from the patients body after placement of the drape; and

at least one pocket on the outer surface of said main sheet, said pocket being spaced from the site of surgical procedure and being positioned in the expected path of fluid runoff from the surgical site during the surgical procedure, said pocket having a pouch and an upper edge defining an opening communicating with said pouch, with said opening facing toward the surgical site to receive fluid runoff in said pouch, said pocket having a pair of side edges, a lower edge connecting the side edges of the pocket, and a fenestration adjacent its lower edge for channeled runoff ofexcessive fluid from said pocket.

12. The drape of claim 11 wherein at least a portion of said pocket is sloped with said fenestration being located adjacent the lower end of said slope.

13. The drape of claim 12 wherein said pocket means is chevron-shaped with said fenestration being located at the point of the chevron.

14. A drape for performing a surgical procedure on a patients body, comprising:

a main sheet for placement on the patients body, said main sheet having a pair of side edges, a pair of end edges connecting the side edges, an inner surface for contacting the patients body after placement of the drape, and an outer surface facing away from the patients body after placement of the drape;

at least one pocket on the outer surface of said main sheet, said pocket being spaced from the site of surgical procedure and being positioned in the expected path of fluid runoff from the surgical site during the surgical procedure, and said pocket having a pouch and an upper edge defining an opening communicating with said pouch, with said opening facing toward the surgical site to receive fluid runoff in said pouch; and

a liquid permeable, non-absorbent, liner secured inside said pouch to capture sponges during the course of the surgical procedure.

15. The drape of claim 14 wherein said liner has a color which contrasts with the expected color of said sponges.

16. A drape for performing a surgical procedure on a patients body, comprising:

a main sheet for placement on the patients body,

said main sheet having an inner surface for contacting the patients body after placement of the drape, and an outer surface facing away from the patients body after placement of the drape;

pocket means on the outer surface of said main sheet, said pocket means being spaced from the site of surgical procedure and being positioned in the expected path of fluid runoff from the surgical site during the surgical procedure, and said pocket means having a pouch and an upper edge defining an opening communicating with said pouch, with said opening facing toward the surgical site to receive fluid runoff in said pouch; and

an absorbent material positioned in said pouch to retain fluid runoff in the pouch.

17. The drape of claim 16 wherein said absorbent material comprises an absorbent sheet secured to and covering at least a portion of the inside of said pocket means.

18. The drape of claim 16 wherein said absorbent material comprises an absorbent sheet positioned in said pouch.

19. The drape of claim 18 wherein said absorbent sheet is folded along a fold line, and said absorbent sheet is positioned in the pouch with said fold line facing toward said opening.

20. The drape of claim 16 wherein said absorbent material comprises an absorbent filler material positioned in said pouch.

21. The drape of claim 16 including a liquid permeable, non-absorbent, liner secured inside the absorbent material in said pouch to capture sponges during the course of the surgical procedure.

22. The drape of claim 21 wherein said liner has a color which contrasts with the expected color of said sponges.

23. A drape for performing a surgical procedure on a patients body, comprising: a main sheet for placement on the patients body, said main sheet having a fenestration, an inner surface for contacting the patients body after placement of the drape, an outer surface facing away from the patients body after placement of the drape, a pair of generally aligned fold lines in the main sheet defining a tuck extending through the main sheet below said fenestration after placement of the drape, and means securing said tuck to the main sheet on opposite sides of the fenestration to define a pocket having an opening facing toward the fenestration for receiving fluid runoff from the fenestration.

24. A drape for performing a surgical procedure on a patients body comprising: a main sheet for placement on the patients body, said main sheet having a fenestration, a pair of side edges, a pair of end edges connecting the side edges, an inner surface for contacting the patients body after placement of the drape, an outer surface facing away from the patients body after placement of the drape, a pair of generally aligned fold lines intermediate saidfenestration and each of said side edges, with each pair of fold lines being generally aligned with the nearest side edge and defining a longitudinally extending tuck in the main sheet, and means securing each of said tucks to the main sheet intermediate said fenestration and each of said end edges to define a pocket under each of said tucks having an opening facing toward the fenestration for receiving fluid runoff from the fenestration.

25. A drape for performing a surgical procedure on a patients body, comprising:

a main sheet for placement on the patients body,

said main sheet having a fenestration, an inner surface for contacting the patients body after placement of the drape, and an outer surface facing away from the patients body after placement of the drape;

a reinforcement sheet secured to the outer surface of the main sheet, said reinforcement sheet having a pair of generally aligned fold lines defining a tuck extending in the reinforcement sheet; and

means securing said tuck to the reinforcement sheet on opposite sides of the fenestration to define a pocket having an opening facing towrd the fenestration for receiving fluid runoff from the fenestration.

26. The drape of claim 25 wherein said tuck extends through the reinforcement sheet, and the securing means secures the ends of said tuck to the reinforcement sheet.

27. The drape of claim 25 wherein said reinforcement sheet includes a fenestration in registration with the fenestration of the main sheet.

28. A drape for performing a surgical procedure on a patients body, comprising:

a main sheet for placement on the patients body, said main sheet having a fenestration, a pair of side edges, a pair of end edges connecting the side edges, an inner surface for contacting the patients body after placement of the drape, and an outer surface facing away from the patients body after placement of the drape;

a reinforcement sheet secured to the outer surface of the main sheet, said reinforcement sheet having a fenestration in registration with the fenestration of the main sheet, a pair of side edges intermediate the fenestrations and the side edges of the main sheet, a pair of end edges intermediate the fenestrations and the end edges of the main sheet, and a pair of generally aligned fold lines intermediate the fenestrations and each of the side edges of teh reinforcement sheet, with each of the pair of fold lines defining a tuck in the reinforcement sheet; and

means securing each of said tucks to the reinforcement sheet intermediate the fenestrations and each of the end edges of the main sheet to define a pair of pockets having openings facing toward the fenestrations for receiving fluid runoff from the fenestrations.

29. The drape of claim 28 wherein the pairs of fold lines extend between the end edges of the reinforcement sheet, and the securing means secures the ends of said tucks to the reinforcement sheet.

30.The drape of claim 28 including an absorbent material positioned in each of the pockets.

3,791,382 February 12, 1974 Patent No. Dated Inventor(s) Robert F. Collins It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

In Column 2, line 34, "FIS" should be Figs.

In Column 7, line 28, the word "edges" is omitted and should be inserted after the word "upper'".

In Column 10, line 48, "teh" should be the Addfthe 2' attached sheets of drawings mmtalining Figs. 5-1 7.

Signed and sealed this 6th day of August 1974.

(SEAL) Attest:

MCCOY M. GIBSON, JR. C. MARSHALL DANN Attesting Officer Commissioner of Patents FORM PO-IOSO (10-69) I I uscoMM- man-pea 9 U. S. GOVEINNINY PI'I'HNG OFFICE Z I," 3-J3l

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US2775770 *May 4, 1954Jan 1, 1957Clais KellerAdjustable pleats for garment pockets
US3030957 *Mar 6, 1959Apr 24, 1962Melges Frederick JDisposable obstetrical and/or surgical cover means
US3364928 *Sep 8, 1966Jan 23, 1968Parke Davis & CoSurgical drape
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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Classifications
U.S. Classification128/853
International ClassificationA61B19/00, A61B19/08
Cooperative ClassificationA61B19/08
European ClassificationA61B19/08
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Feb 1, 1990ASAssignment
Owner name: BOUNDARY HEALTHCARE PRODUCTS CORPORATION, MISSISSI
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:KENDALL COMPANY, THE;REEL/FRAME:005254/0070
Effective date: 19900126
Feb 1, 1989ASAssignment
Owner name: MANUFACTURERS HANOVER TRUST COMPANY, AS AGENT
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:KENDALL COMPANY, THE;REEL/FRAME:005251/0007
Effective date: 19881027