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Publication numberUS3792241 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 12, 1974
Filing dateFeb 3, 1972
Priority dateFeb 3, 1972
Publication numberUS 3792241 A, US 3792241A, US-A-3792241, US3792241 A, US3792241A
InventorsJ Sullivan
Original AssigneeJovil Mfg Co Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Counter control circuit
US 3792241 A
Abstract
This invention provides a device for controlling the stepping of a counter counting the passage of an object or objects through a selected point. The device includes a pair of detectors, one for detecting the passage of an object through the selected point and one for detecting the passage of the object through a second or trigger point situated prior to said selected point in the path of travel of the object. A bistable device is set to its first state in response to an output from the second point detector when the device is in its second state. The bistable device is reset to its second state and the counter stepped in response to an output from the selected point detector if, at the time the output is generated, the bistable device is in its first state. Thus, once the counter is stepped, it cannot be stepped again until the object again passes through the trigger point. The generation of spurious count pulses is thus surpressed. For a preferred embodiment, the device is being used in coil winding machine to control the counting of multiple wire turns wound on the coil, and the selected and second points are spaced by a distance greater than the maximum distance between wires to assure that the counter is stepped just once for each turn regardless of the number of wires being wound.
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United States Patent 1191 Sullivan 1 Feb. 12, 1974 US. Cl...... 235/92 CW, 235/92 V, 235/92 PK, 235/92 R, 242/4 Int. Cl B65h 81/02 Field'of Search235/92 PK, 92 SB, 92 V, 92 CW, 235/92 PF, 98 R, 98C; 242/4 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,812,136 11/1957 Stern-Montagny 235/92 cw 2,420,590 5/1947 Everhart 235/92 CW 2,656,979 10/1953 De Palma.. 235/92 SB 2,883,108 4/1959 Thornton... 235/92 PK 3/1971 Cox... 235/92 FP Primary Examiner-Maynard R. Wilbur Assistant Examiner-Joseph M. Thesz, Jr. Attorney, Agent, or FirmRonald J. Kransdorf 5 7 1 ABSTRACT This invention provides a device for controlling the stepping of a counter counting the passage of an object or objects through a selected point. The device includes a pair of detectors, one for detecting the passage of an object through the selected point and one for detecting the passage of the object through a second or trigger point situated prior to said selected point in the path of travel of the object. A bistable device is set to its first state in response to an output from the second point detector whenthe device is in its second state. The bistable device is reset to its second state and the counter stepped in response to an output from the selected point detector if, at the time the output is generated, the bistable device is in its first state. Thus, once the counter is stepped, it cannot he stepped again until the object again passes through the trigger point. The generation of spurious count pulses is thus surpressed. For a preferred embodiment, the device is being used in coil Winding machine to control the counting of multiple wire turns wound on the coil, and the selected and second points are spaced by a distance greater than the maximum distance between wires to assure that the counter is stepped just once for each turn regardless of the num ber of wires being wound.

5 Claims, 3 Drawing Figures STEP L COUNTER H PHOTOCWM/(TOR C/RC U/ T COUNTER CONTROL CIRCUIT This invention relates to a device for controlling and incrementingor decrementing of a counter counting the passage of an object or objects through a selected point, and more particularly to a circuit for controlling the counting of the number of turns ofa wire wound on a coil by an automatic coil winding machine.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION In any application where the passage of an object through a particular point is being automatically detected and a counter stepped in response to each such detection, there is a danger that the detector may be spuriously energized so as to cause erroneous counts. Such false triggering may, for example, be caused by the random passage of dust, dirt, or the like through the detector. Where the object is a strand, such as a wire, and the detector is a contact which is opened momentarily as the wire passes through it, contact bounce may result in extra countpulses being generated. Vibration of a wire as it passes through the detector, regardless of the detector type may also cause erroneous extra count pulses to be generated. Finally, where the object is wire being wound on a coil by a coil-winding machine, and multiple wires are being simultaneously wound, theturn counter is normally incremented only once for each turn regardless of the number of wires being wound. However, if the wires being wound become slightly spaced from each other, the detector may respond separately to each wire, resulting again in extra count pulses being generated. A need therefore exists for a simple and reliable means for surpressing the generation of spurious count pulses in situations and applications such as those indicated above.

It is therefore, a primary object of this invention to provide an improved device for controlling the stepping of a counter counting the passage of an object or Objects through a selected point.

A more specific object of this invention is to provide a device for surpressing the generation of spurious count pulses to a counter counting the number of turns of-wire wrapped on a coil by an automatic coil winding machine.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In accordance with these objects, this invention provides a device for controlling the stepping of a counter counting the passage of an object or objects through a first or selected point. The device includes a means for detecting the passage of an object through a second or trigger point, an object passing through the second point prior in its travel path to its passage through the selected point. The device also includes a means responsive to the second point detecting means and to a bistable means being in a first state for setting the bistable means to its second state. A means is also provided for detecting the passage of an object through the first or selected point. Finally, there is a means responsive to the selected point detecting means and to the bistable means being in its second state for resetting the bistable means to its first state and for stepping the counter. Thus, once the counter has been stepped, it can not be stepped again until an object, such as a wire again passes through the trigger or second point. The generation of spurious count pulses is thus suppressed. By spacing the second point and the selected point by a distance greater than the maximum spacing between multiple objects, such as wires to be counted, the generation of more than one-count pulse as a result of the multiple objects passing through the selected point is likewise surpressed.

The foregoing and other objects, features, an advantage of the invention will be apparent from the follow ing more particular description of a preferred embodiment of the invention as illustrated in the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the portion of an automatic coil winding machine involved in a preferred embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 2 is a schematic functional block diagram of the circuit of this invention.

FIG. 3 is a detailed, semi-block schematic diagram of the circuit of a preferred embodiment of the invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION Referring now to FIG. 1, a portion of an automatic coil-winding machine is shown. Machines of this type are fairly well-known in the art, an example of a machine of this type being shown in U. S. Pat. No. 3,400,894 entitled, Toroidal Coil Winding Machine, issued Sept. 10, 1968 to R. A. McIntosh et. al. Referance may be had to this patent for a detailed descrip tion of coil winding machines of the type involved in the invention.

Basically, the machine consists of a ring-shaped shuttle 10, having a wire receiving groove 11 formed therein. The shuttle may be rotated in either the clockwise or counterclockwise direction by four shuttle support pulleys 12. Each pulley is connected by a shaft 14 to a pulley drive mechanism 16. Since this drive mechanism does not form part of the present invention, it will not be described further here. However, reference may be had to the above-mentioned Mlclntosh patent for a description of this mechanism. A slider 18 is positioned on shuttle 12 for reasons which will be described shortly. Shuttle l2 interlinks toroidal core 20 on which wire is to be wound. Core 20 is rotated in the counterclockwise direction by drive rollers 22 which are driven in a suitable manner from assembly 24. Again, the driving of these rollers does not form part of the present invention and will not be described further. An idler roller 26 is provided to hold core 201 in the desired position.

In operation, shuttle 10 is initially opened to permit it to be interlinked with core 20*, the elements then being positioned as shown in FIG. 1. Wire from a supply (not shown) is then wound on shuttle 10 by suitably connecting an end of the wire to the shuttle and then rotating the shuttle in a clockwise direction, the rotation being effected by pulleys 12. It should be noted that one or more strands of wire may be wound on the shuttle during this operation.

When the required amount of wire has been wound on the shuttle, the wire is'cut and the free end of the wire is passed through slider 18 and secured in a convenient place within the shuttle. The motor in assembly 16 is then reversed to cause shuttle 10 to be rotated in a counter-clockwise direction. At the same time, drive rollers 22 are energized from assembly 24 to rotate core 20 in a counter-clockwise direction as well. As shuttle 10 rotates, it carries slider 1l8 with it through the center of the core and the wire is drawn over the side of the core and laid upon the core. During the half revolution of shuttle after slider 18 passes through core 20, the length of wire between the core and the slider is held taut as illustrated by the wire 30 shown in dotted line inFIG. 1. This causes wire to be drawn off the shuttle and the slider to move clockwise relative to the ring. After the slider passes the horizontal (the midpoint of the shuttle), there will be slackness in the wire which has been drawn off the shuttle. This wire is formed into a loop as illustrated by the wire 30 shown in solid line. This loop is taken up as the slider procedes back into core 20 and is laid upon the core toform the next turn thereon. For purposes of illustration, three wires have been shown as being wound on the coil. However, the mechanism is adapted for winding a greater or lesser number of wires simultaneously. The rotation of coil 20 is in synchronism with the rotation of shuttle l0 and assures the uniform laying of wires thereon.

Heretofore, the counting of the number of turns of wire wound on a coil has generally been accomplished by placing a normally closed electrical contact in the path of the loop formed by wires 30. As the loop is pulled toward core 20, it passes between the terminals of this contact momentarily separating them to cause a count pulse to be generated. As indicated preiously, this mechanism for activating the turn counter may result in spurious count pulses being generated as a result of contact bounce, vibration of the wire causing the wire to pass through the contact more than once, or as illustrated in FIG. 1, multiple wires separating and going through the contacts individually or in random combinations so as to generate multiple counts where only one is desired. While a single photo-electric detector, such as the light 33A and photo-cell 34A combination shown in FIG. 1, can eliminate spurious pulses caused by contact bounce, it does not solve the problem of wire vibration or wire separation.

This invention overcomes the problem indicated above by providing a second detector which consists of a light 32B and a photo-cell 34B. This detector is positioned to have wires pass through it at a point in the path of travel of the wire prior to the point at which the wire passes through the detector formed by light 32A and photo-cell 34A. In the discussion to follow the combination of light 32A and photo-cell 34A will be collectively referred to as detector 36A while the combination oflight 32B and photo-cell 348 will be collectively referred to as detector 368.

In operation, detector 368 is connected in a manner to be described shortly, has a trigger to condition the incrementing of a turn counter when the wire passes detector 36A. Once wire passes detector 36A, the trigger is reset to prevent additional count pulses from being generated until wire again passes detector 368. Thus so long as the separation between wires 30 is no greater than the distance between detectors 36A and 363, the turn counter will be incremented only once after the counter is conditioned regardless of the number of wires which pass through detector 36A or the number of times a single wire passes through the detector because of vibration or the like.

FIG. 2 is a functional block diagram ofa circuit utilizing the teachings of thisinvention to control the stepping of a turn counter 40. The circuit includes a count photo-cell circuit 42A, which includes count photo-cell 34A, and a trigger photo-cell circuit 428 which includes trigger photo-cell 348. When a wire passes de tector 368, a pulse is generated by circuit 428 and applied as one input to AND gate 44. If bistable flip-flop 46 is in its ONE-state, generating an output on ONE- state output line 48, AND gate 44 is fully conditioned to generate an output on line 50 which is applied to set slip-flop 46 to its ZERO state. When flip-flop 46 is in its ZERO state, trigger circuit 428 is ineffective to cause any change.

When the wire has advanced to a position to pass through detector 36A, circuit 42A generates an output pulse which as applied is one input to AND gate 52. Flip-flop 46 being in its ZERO state at this time generates an output on ZERO-side'output line 54 to fully condition AND gate 52, resulting in an output signal on line 56. The signal on line 56 is applied to step turn counter 40, and is also applied to set flip-flop its ONE state. With flip-flop 46 in its ONE state, AND gate 52 is deconditioned, preventing the application of further output pulses from circuit 42A to increment counter 40. Thus, counter 40 can not be further incremented until wire passes through detector 368 to again set flipflop 46 to its ZERO state.

FIG. 3 is a detailed schematic diagram of a circuit of a preferred embodiment of the invention, implementing the concepts and functions of FIG. 2. In this figure, it is seen that lamps 32A and 32B are connected between a plus 5 volt D.C. source 60 and ground, causing these lamps to be continuously illuminated. Photo-cell 34A is connected in series with a variable resistor 62A between terminal 60 in ground. The junction between photo-cell 34A and resistor 62A is connected through resistor 64A to the base of transitor 66A. The collector of this transistor is connected to the base of transistor 68A and through resistor 70A to terminal 60. The emmiters of transistors 66A and 69A are connected to ground, and the collector of transistor 68A is connected through the resistor 72A to terminal 60. The circuitry described above is included in the counting section photo-cell circuit 42A. A corresponding circuit arrangement exists for the trigger section photo-cell circuit 42B.

In operation, the resistance value of each variable resistor 62 is selected such that the corresponding transistor 66 is normally conducting. However when an object passes in front of a photo-cell 34, momentarily raising its resistance, the corresponding transistor 66 is cut off, causing the corresponding transistor 68 to become conductive. Transistor 68 becoming conductive lowers the potential at its collector to near ground potential. This is the logic zero level.

In FIG. 3, the functions of AND gates 44 and 52 and flip-flop 46 are performed, for the most part, by a pair of cross-connected NAND gates 74 and 76. Gates 74 and 76 function to generate a logic ZERO output (near ground potential) if both inputs are at logic ONE level (near plus 5 volts), and to generate a logic ONE output if either of the inputs is at a logic ZERO level. Thus, assume initially that it is the trigger photo-cell 348 which has a wire pass in front of it. As indicated previously, this causes a logic ZERO potential level on collector output line 78B from transistor 68B, resulting in a ZERO input level on this line into NAND gate 76. This results in a ONE logic level at the output from this NAND gate which is applied through line 80 to an input of NAND gate 74. Since cells 34A and 34B are not simultaneously energized, a logical one (plus 5 volt) output level is appearing at this time on line 78A. Thus, logic ONE levels are appearing on both inputs to NAND gate 74, causing a logical ZERO on its output line 82. This logic ZERO is applied to the other input of NAND gate 76, latching this NAND gate with a logical ONE output even after line 783 returns to a logical ONE level. i

When photo-cell 34A is subsequently energized, line 78A mementarily goes to a logic ZERO level, causing the output of NAND gate 74 online 82 to go to a logic ONE level. Both inputs to NAND gate 76 are thus at a logic ONE level, causing a logic ZERO level to appear on line 80. This logic ZERO level on line 80 latches NAND gate 74 with a logical one output. Counter 40 is preferably of a type which responds to the transition from a logic ZERO to a logic ONE level on line 82. Since this transition occurs only when NAND gate 74 is generating a ZERO output and a wire is detected by detector 36A, and since once the transition occurs, it cannot occur again until NAND gate 74 is again generating a ZERO output as a result of a wire passing detector 368, the desired spurious pulse suppression is achieved.

Each line 78 is also connected through a resistor 84 to the base of a transistor 86. The collector of each transistor 86 is connected through a lamp 88 to 5 volt source 60. Lamp 88 is utilized to tune the circuit and to also provide a visual indication of wire passing the associated detector. 3

Thus, resistor 62 for each section is adjusted until the corresponding lamp is ignited. This means that transistor 66 is conducting, and transistor 68 cut off, resulting in a logic ONE level on line 78 which causes transistor 86 to conduct, permitting current flow through lamp 80. When a wire passes in front of the photo-cell 34, the conductive state of the transistors should be re-' versed from that indicated above, causing the lamp 88 to be turned off. If this does not occur, resistor 62 is adjusted to cause it to occur. It is apparent that a lamp 88 will flicker each time a wire passes through the corresponding detector 36 during the counting operation. Thus, multiple flickers may'be utilized to detect the passage of multiple wires through the detector, and the absence ofa flicker may provide a visual indication that one of the wires is broken.

For the preferred embodiment of the invention described above, photocell detectors, transistor logic, and a NAND gate flip-flop have been utilized. However, it is apparent that components or devices adapted to perform the requisite functions might be utilized in place of each of these elements. Similarily, a counter 40 which responds to a ONE to ZERO rather than a ZERO to ONE transition might be utilized, and with suitable pregating, a pulse responsive counter might also be used. Thus, while the invention has been described above with a reference to a preferred embodiment thereof, it would be particularly apparent to one skilled in the art that the foregoing other changes in form and detail could be made therein while still remaining within the spirit and scope of the invention.

What is claimed is:

l. A device for controlling the stepping of a counter counting the passage of an object or objects through a selected point in a travel path and for indicating the passage of the object past the point comprising:

means for detecting the passage of an object through a second point, an object passing through said second point prior in the travel path to its passage through the selected point;

a bistable means having first and second states;

means responsive to the second point detecting means and to said bistable means being in said first state for setting the bistable means to the second state;

means for detecting the passage of an object through said selected point; means responsive to the selected point detecting means and to the bistable means being in said second state for resetting the bistable means to the first state and for stepping the counter; (and) means responsive to each of said means for detecting for providing a separate visual indication of the passage of an object through said second and said selected point, said visual indication providing means being separate lamps for each of said detecting means; and i means for utilizing said lamps to tune the corresponding detecting means.

2. [n a coil winding machine, a device for counting the number of multiple wire turns wound on a coil, it being possible that the multiple wires being wound may be spaced from each other as they move through a travel path during the winding of turns on the coil, and it being desired to increment a counter only once for each turn regardless of the number of wires being wound, comprising:

means for detecting the passage of a wire or wires through a first point in said travel path; means for detecting the passage of a wire or wires through a second point in said travel path, a wire passing through said second point prior in its travel path to its passage through said first point, the spacing between said first and second points being greater than the maximum spacing between said multiple wires being wound; a bistable means having first and second states; means responsive to the second point detecting means and to said bistable means being in said first state for setting the bistable means to the second state; and 7 means responsive to the first point detecting means and to the bistable means being in said second state for resetting the bistable means to the first state and for stepping said counter.

3. A device of the type described in claim 2 wherein said means for detecting the passage of wire through said first and said second points are lamp-photo-cell pairs, the lamp and photo-cell of each pair being spaced to permit the passage of an object therebetween.

4. A device of the type described in claim 2 including means responsive to said means for detecting for providing a separate visual indication of the passage of wire through said first and said selected points.

5. A device of the type described in claim 4 wherein said visual indication providing means are separate lamps for each said detecting means; and including means for utilizing said lamps to tune the corresponding detecting means

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3964703 *Mar 17, 1975Jun 22, 1976Computer Identics CorporationMagnetic object detection
US4107516 *Mar 7, 1977Aug 15, 1978Coal Industry (Patents) LimitedPulse counting apparatus for measuring mechanical movement of a machine such as a mining machine
US4122331 *Jun 1, 1977Oct 24, 1978Giken Trading CompanyPasser counter
US4321531 *Sep 17, 1979Mar 23, 1982Sangamo-Weston Inc.Direction sensitive pulse initiator for a wattmeter
US4501006 *Sep 29, 1982Feb 19, 1985Michael KorenbergHot-box signalling devices
US4529138 *Aug 29, 1983Jul 16, 1985Westinghouse Electric Corp.Strip core winder for core-coil assembly
US4741000 *Jun 24, 1986Apr 26, 1988Keyence Co., Ltd.Photoelectronic switch
US4756012 *Feb 27, 1987Jul 5, 1988Hewlett-Packard CompanySurface mounted device parts counter
USRE30012 *Jan 19, 1978May 29, 1979Computer Identics CorporationMagnetic object detection device
Classifications
U.S. Classification377/3, 242/912, 377/53, 377/30, 242/434.2
International ClassificationB65H81/02, H01F41/08
Cooperative ClassificationH01F41/08, Y10S242/912, B65H81/02
European ClassificationB65H81/02, H01F41/08