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Publication numberUS3792391 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 12, 1974
Filing dateDec 18, 1972
Priority dateDec 18, 1972
Publication numberUS 3792391 A, US 3792391A, US-A-3792391, US3792391 A, US3792391A
InventorsL Ewing
Original AssigneeL Ewing
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electrically operated two position electromechanical mechanism
US 3792391 A
Abstract
An electrical type of lock wherein the mechanical movement is actuated in response to a solenoid system triggered by an electrical momentary signal. The locking bolt alternatively changes from a locking to unlocking position or vice versa in a snap action and is retained in its respective position. The bolt is modified by mechanical means in association with the solenoid.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1191 1111 3,792,391 Ewing 1451 Feb. 12,1974

1 1 ELECTRICALLY OPERATED TWO POSITION ELECTROMECIIANICAL MECHANISM FOREIGN PATENTS QR APPLICATIONS 909,744 10/1962 Great Britain 70/280 [76] Inventor: Lionel Lee Ewing, 750 Maple St. Primary ExaminerAlbert G. Craig, Jr.

Apt. No. 21-8, Manfield, Ohio 44906 57 ABSTRACT [22] Filed: 1972 An electrical type of lock wherein the mechanical [21 AppL NO; 316,079 movement is actuated in response to a solenoid system triggered by an electrical momentary signal. The locking bolt alternatively changes from a locking to un- [52] US. Cl 335/254, 74/126, 292/144 locking position or vice versa in a Snap action and is [51] '3 .Eosb 47/02 Holf 7/16 retained in its respective position. The bolt is modified [58] held of Search 292/144 201; 335/253 254; by mechanical means in association with the solenoid.

The lockmg arrangement and Its actuation c1rcu1try 1s 56] References Cited part cnlarly adaptable to a system wherein the 1n1t1at1ng voltage 15 transm1tted v1a communication UNITED STATES PATENTS lines i.e., telephone lines from a remotely located 1,768,021 6/1930 Bauerband .1 70/282 control station, 2,340,092 1/1944 Wells 335/253 3,062,034 11/1962 Leslie 70/264 l ims, 3 Drawing FlgllleS 28A Q so I so 1111]) i 70 e 54 v I PATENTEDFEB 1 21974 3. 792.391

- sum 2 [1F 2 ELECTRICALLY OPERATED TWO POSITION ELECTROMECHANICAL MECHANISM CROSS REFERENCE Reference is made to my co-pending patent application Ser. No. 316,078 for Closed Loop Communication Wire system, filed Dec. 18, l972; and to my copending patent application Ser. No. 316,091 for Electric Strike Operable From A Remote Control Station, filed Dec. 18, I972.

In the first reference application a direct current voltage is transmitted from a control station via communication lines to a plurality of remote stations wherein it is desired to control the movement of a mechanical device, switch, or electrical component.

The direct current voltage is accumulated in a storage circuit and then applied momentarily to the electrical component. The system is particularly described in conjunction with a solenoid operated door lock. A switch activated by the position of the door controls a signal generator in repetition rate. The indicative signals are returned via same telephone lines to the control station.

In the second referenced application a mechanical locking arrangement is described operable upon the actuation of a relay. The simplified circuitry described therewith makes that lock particularly adaptable to most doors.

BACKGROUND Prior art door locks of the solenoid and the electric strike type achieve the lock or unlock position by either energizing or de-energizing a coil or solenoid. A few utilize two coils or solenoids one to unlock, the other to lock. In the case of energize, de-energize, the coil or solenoidmust be designed for continuous duty. This generally means the use of more copper, better insulation and provision'for heat dissipation. The use of two coils or solenoids duplicates that expense and that of wiring and control circuits. None of the prior art solenoid type locks are suitable for use without local power and most are not sufficiently rugged or secure that they cannot be tampered or moved by hand.

Noneresult in the lock shifting from the lock to unlock position and vice versa with momentary energization of a single coil or solenoid an important requirement if the lock is to be operated remotely with a simple circuit not requiring local power.

SUMMARY OF INVENTION The electric bolt of the preferred embodiment basically comprises a solenoid and a core operable in a single snap direction in response to the solenoid being momentarily energized. The bolt attached to the core is retained in a first position by a spring. Upon energization of the coil with a first pulse, the core and bolt are retracted by the coils magnetic field overcoming the spring tension. Apparatus fixedly positions the bolt and retains the bolt in its retracted position. Upon the application of a succeeding pulse, kinetic storage means releases the fixed position of the bolt to permit the spring to return the bolt to its extended position. Circuitry is provided to energize the coil with power substantially greater than that normally transmitted via communication wires. In this way the lock is a two step function for alternatively locking and unlocking in a snap action upon momentary energization of the coil.

The lock finds particular utility in a system for locking and unlocking a heavy or large type of enclosure at a local station in response to a control signal from a control station transmitted via the communication lines.

OBJECTS It is accordingly a principal object of the present invention to to provide a new and improved electrical solenoid type of lock.

Another object of the invention is to provide an electrical solenoid lock alternatively responsive to an electrical signal of only a momentary duration.

Another object of the invention is to provide an electrical solenoid lock having a positive snap action.

Another object of the invention is to provide an electrical bolt type lock having a minimum number of components operable together in a rugged and reliable manner.

Still another object is to provide a remotely operable lock having a simplified storage and control circuit, not necessarily requiring a metallic connection to the remote control center and not requiring local power.

Other objects and features of the present invention will become apparent from the following detailed description when taken in conjunction with FIG. 1 and 1A of the drawing showing in cross section the solenoid lock with the improvements of the present invention in a preferred embodiment; and

FIG. 2 illustrating schematically the simplified structure of the solenoid lock of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING and other perimeter protection switches located on other doors, windows, etc. The switches are used in tuning circuits to generate condition signals in the nature of oscillatory signals indicative of which switch was activated. These signals are returned to the control station via the same communication line.

With particular reference to the electrically actuated solenoid lock of FIGS. 1 and 1A, bolt 28 is slidably moveable in the opening 30 in the housing 10. The bolt 28 has a part 28a that is urged to protrude from the opening 30 by the action of spring 54. The bolt 28 protruding from the opening 30 is the bolt that would enter its female counter part in a door or enclosure for securmg.

' The housing 10 is best illustrated in the expanded view of FIG. 2. The housing 10 which actually is a support member is shown in its upright position. In this position the lock would be adapted to bolt close an enclosure from its underside, although it can be used in any position. The housing 10 has in its main back side portion 12 several apertures 10a, 10b, 10c, and 10d for securing the structure in position. A pair A pair of right angle arms I4 and 16 also have a pair of apertures 14a and 16a aligned to receive and fixedly position the solenoid casing 20. That is, solenoid casing has an upper portion with a pair of ears 22 and 24 also having apertures 22a and 24a. The center-to-center distance between the apertures 22a and 24a is identical the distance between the apertures 14a and 16a. In this way the solenoid housing 20 is fixedly positioned onto the structure 12 as shown in FIGS. 1 and 1A.

In the conventional operation of a solenoid/bolt type of lock applying power to the coil of the solenoid will cause the bolt (core) to retract. The bolt is maintained therein so long as power is applied. Upon removing the power from the coil the magnetic forces are removed the bolts position is overcome by the forces of a spring. In essence then the power maintains the bolt in a first position and the spring in the second position.

It can be appreciatedthat if the solenoid and bolt are of a substantial size and large amount of power is needed to maintain energization of the coil. Also in the locked position to tamper with the lock it is necessary only to overcome the forces of the spring. In the preferred embodiment of the present invention the bolt position is obtained by a burst or momentary application of power; and the position is maintained by a mechanical locking arrangement. This reduces the power requirements considerably and makes the lock operable from a low power source as described inmy co-pending application, supra, and allows the use of a larger spring substantially eliminating tampering.

The preferred embodiment of the present invention is shown in part-per-part in FIG. 2 and in an unlocked position in FIG. 1 and locked position in FIG. 1A.

The solenoid in the present invention, as stated above, is operable from a momentary application of power. More specifically the power applied to the coil of the solenoid is in the nature of a pulse. Continuous power is not applied in either position. A pulse is applied to activate the solenoid to retract the bolt and a pulse is applied to again activate the solenoid to release the bolt.

With particular reference now to the figures, link 50 has a lower aperture 38 adapted to slidably receive pin 36. A second aperture 39 has pressed fitted therein pin 42. The other end of pin 36 is pressed-fitted into aperture 37 in the bolt 28. This pin also serves to connect the bolt to the solenoid core. The other end of pin 42 is positioned in the elongated groove 32. This groove is formed in the upright portion 12 of the structure 10.

lts widthis somewhat greater than the diameter of the pin 42 to permit sliding therein without disengagement. The groove at its lower most end has a flat" 34 formed therein to permit the pin 42 to be seated and retained therein. This flat is perpendicular to bolt 28.

The lock (bolt 28) in its open (retracted) position has pin 42 seated in the flat 34. In the closed (extended) position of the lock (bolt 28) the pin 42 is positioned in the upper region of the slot 32. Also in the extended position the forward travel of the core is stopped by the contact of solenoid coil plate 56 and the housing at 70.

A bar type of spring 46 having an arc portion 44, shown in FIG. 2, is positioned on the upright portion of the structure 10 adjacent to the link 50. That is, cross pin 40 in link contacts the arc portion 44 of spring 46.

In operation a pulse applied actuates the solenoid which in turn retracts the bolt 28. As the bolt 28 is retracted link 50 assumes an upright position as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2. The pin 6 positioned in aperture 38 forces the lower end downward. The pin 42 is forced into the flat end 34 of the elongated groove 32. Although the power applied is only momentary, the bolt 28 will stay retracted since it is locked into position by the pin 42 in the end 34 of the groove 32.

At the same time the arc portion of the spring 46 is forced to the left and thereby put into tension. Pin 40 is moveably mounted in link 50 and is retained on one end by head 64 which also serves to contact the arc portion 44 of spring 46. Pin 40 is retained on the opposite end by pin 61 press fitted into aperture 60. A small spring 62 urges pin 40 to the left. In the final stage of retraction, the kinetic energy of link 50, pin 42 and pin 40 are absorbed by springs 46 and 62. Spring 54 opposes retraction and immediately following complete retraction reverses the direction of bolt movement and causes link 50 to move slightly upward to cause pin 42 to contact end 34 of groove 32. The bolt 28 is now held in the retracted position by the force of spring 54 causing contact between pin 42 and end 34 of groove 32.

To actuate the bolt to a door lock position a second pulse is applied to again energize the coil of the solenoid 20. The bolt already retracted, will retract only enough to relieve the contact pressure between pin 42 and end 34 of groove 32. As no kinetic energy is developed by pin 40, link 50 and pin 42 pivoting about pin 36; as was previously the case, the kinetic energy stored in springs 46 and 62 causes the link 50 to pivot in a clockwise direction. The spring 54 now causes the bolt to extend as pin 42 travels freely upwards in slot 32.

The spring 54 is fixed at its lower end to the casing 20 and at its upper end to plate 56 fixed to a movable portion of the solenoid.

Microswitch 49 contacts movable solenoid core plate 56 to detect and transmit locked or unlocked position, as described in my co-pending patent applications, supra.

Although certain and specific embodiments have been described and illustrated it is to be specifically understood that modifications may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. An electrically operated two position electromechanical mechanism including a solenoid having a core therein and a spring for urging said core outwardly, the

improvement comprising; a means for applying a first electrical power pulse to said solenoid to retract said core, and structure moveably connected to said core to retain said core in its retracted position upon removal of said pulse; kinetic energy storage means also connected to said structure means, means of applying a second'powe'r pulse to said solenoid to thereby release said kinetic energy and thereby release said core from said retained position, and whereby said spring tension returns said core to its outwardly position.

2. The electrically operated mechanism of claim 1 wherein said two position electromechanical mechanism is a locking and releasing mechanism.

3. The electrically operated mechanism of claim 1 wherein said structure is a link having an upper and lower pin and a housing for supporting said mechanism, said pin interconnecting said core to said housing.

4. The electrically operated mechanism of claim 2 wherein said housing has an elongated slot formed therein and said upper pin is positioned in said slot.

5. The electrically operated mechanism of claim 3 wherein said slot in said housing further includes a portion adapted to receive and retain said pin in position.

6. The electrically operated mechanism of claim 1 wherein said kinetic energy storage means is a bar type of spring.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1768021 *Apr 8, 1926Jun 24, 1930William E BauerbandLock
US2340092 *May 15, 1941Jan 25, 1944Westinghouse Electric & Mfg CoLatching means for electromagnetic devices
US3062034 *Sep 8, 1959Nov 6, 1962Gen Motors CorpCoincidental door locking system
GB909744A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4771255 *Jan 2, 1987Sep 13, 1988Regdon Solenoid, Inc.Solenoid with a mechanical locking linkage
US4800741 *Sep 9, 1986Jan 31, 1989Sidney KerschenbaumElectrically and manually operable door lock with convenient backset selection
US5862693 *May 2, 1997Jan 26, 1999Fort Lock CorporationElectronically controlled security lock
US7142967 *Feb 7, 2003Nov 28, 2006Clark Equipment CompanyFeatures of main control computer for a power machine
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Classifications
U.S. Classification335/254, 292/144, 74/126
International ClassificationE05B47/02
Cooperative ClassificationE05B47/0002, E05B47/026, E05B47/0004
European ClassificationE05B47/00A1, E05B47/02R