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Publication numberUS3792899 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 19, 1974
Filing dateDec 29, 1972
Priority dateDec 29, 1972
Also published asDE2364529A1, US3867967
Publication numberUS 3792899 A, US 3792899A, US-A-3792899, US3792899 A, US3792899A
InventorsP Rocchia, R Steffy
Original AssigneeWicker Works
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Woven and braided furniture
US 3792899 A
Abstract
A portion of a woven piece of furniture is provided with a braided periphery integral with the warp of the weave and transverse thereto. The warp strands extend beyond the weave and are braided so that each strand changes directions at least twice to form a generally S-shaped curve and the strands are periodically severed at this time. One or more support strands alone or in a pair are incorporated into the braid during the method to increase the structural strength and improve the appearance of the braid. A braid formed longitudinal to the warp strands and integral with the foregoing transverse one is formed by mounting a plurality of adjacent extending engaging strands in a frame member and braiding strands projecting from the transverse braid together with the engaging strands. A particularly suitable strand material is known in Italy by the name "secca". A variety of attractive braids are formed in the above general manner.
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United States Patent Rocchia et al.

WOVEN AND BRAIDED FURNITURE Inventors: Peter A. Roechia; Robert M. Steffy,

both of San Francisco, Calif.

[73] Assignee: The Wicker Works, San Francisco,

Calif.

Filed: Dec. 29, 1972 Appl. No.: 319,553

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 12/1958 Yuen 297/445 X 10/1905 Scherrer 297/416 7/1929 Bartow 87/1 X 11/1962 Fong 139/424 X Primary Examiner-Paul R. Gilliam A t tqrr ey figenj, or Firm-Flehr, Hohbach, Test, Albritton & l-ierbert m [5 7 ABSTRACT A portion of a woven piece oi furniture is provided with a braided periphery integral with the warp of the weave and transverse thereto. The warp strands extend beyond the weave and are braided so that each strand changes directions at least twice to form a generally S-shaped curve and the strands are periodically severed at this time. One or more support strands alone or in a pair are incorporated into the braid during the method to increase the structural strength and improve the appearance of the braid. A braid formed longitudinal to the warp strands and integral with the foregoing transverse one is formed by mounting a plurality of adjacent extending engaging strands in a frame member and braiding strands projecting from the transverse braid together with the engaging strands. A particularly suitable strand material is known in Italy by the name secca. A variety of attractive braids are formed in the above general manner.

' 5 can; 14 Drawing r t-its WOVEN AND BRAIDED FURNITURE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Woven wicker-type furniture, e.g., chair, couch, table, and the like, has been available for a long period of time. Because the wicker material is relatively thin without substantial structural strength, the warp of the weave is conventionally mounted at both ends into a frame for the furniture. Such frame is conventionally formed of rigid, inflexible rattan material. For decorative purposes, it is common to mount a braided material around the outer periphery of the furniture framework as at the arms, top and sides. Because the braid is a separate entity and is not integral with the woven portion of the furniture, it does not materially assist the structural strength thereof. Furthermore, it is subject to becoming loosened from the frame during normal wear.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION AND OBJECTS It is a general object to provide a piece of attractive, durable furniture of high structural strength.

It is a more particular object of the invention to provide a woven piece of furniture having a braided periphery integral with the warp of the weave.

It is another object of the invention to provide a braided periphery of the above type which is generally transverse to the weave with a sufficient braided network to support the weave without an intervening frame.

It is a further object of the invention to provide a particularly attractive braided periphery of the foregoing type formed in any desired direction with respect to the weave.

It is another object of the invention to eliminate portions of the frame of woven furniture.

Further and other objects of the present invention will be apparent from the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.

In accordance with the above objects, the present invention is directed to a method for forming a portion of a woven piece of furniture having a braided periphery integral with the warp of the weave and also directed to the furniture formed thereby. A plurality of flexible strands are mounted in spaced-apart, side-byside relationship, typically in a base frame member, and extending in a line to form the warp of the weave. The woof of the weave is woven only partially up the warp strands from the mounted ends so that a substantial portion of the warp strands extends beyond the weave. Thereafter, successive warp strands are bent toward the woven surface in a selected direction on alternate sides of subsequent warp strand extensions in a line. This procedure is repeated sequentially to form any of a variety of braid which are integral with the periphery of the weave and generally transverse to the warp of the weave including extending portions of the warp strands as a portion of the braid. In order to provide a braid of sufficient structural strength, it is important that the majority of the warp strand extensions utilized in the weave change directions at least twice to form a generally S-shaped curved portion crossing other similarly shaped warp strand portions. To avoid a. build-up of an excessive number of strands as the braid proceeds in the selected direction to incorporate subsequent warp strand extensions, warp strand portions extending from the braided periphery are periodically severed suitably after they have changed directions twice in the braid to form the above S-shaped curve.

A number of different attractive integral braids of the foregoing type of varying degrees of structural stability may be formed utilizing the foregoing concept of forming the braid integral with the projecting warp strands of the weave. It has been found that incorporating support strand portions into the braided periphery of the same type as the warp strands not only increases the variety of attractive braids that may be formed but also substantially increases the structural stability of the combination of the braid and adjacent woven surface. As defined herein, the support strand portions are either independent new strands positioned between adjacent warp strand extensions or may be portions of previously bent warp strands being carried forward to be incorporated in the particular area of braiding.

In one braiding method utilizing at least two support strand portions, the first bent warp strand portion is bent over a first support strand portion and a second support strand portion is positioned adjacent to the first warp strand portion. The second support strand portion is generally manipulated in the manner described above with respect to the first warp strand portion while the first support strand portion is independently incorporated into the braid.

A more elaborate attractive braid of the foregoing general type utilizes support strand portions in pairs and is described in detail hereinafter. It is to be understood that the support strand portions may include two, three, or more adjacent ones depending upon the particular desired braid from an aesthetic or structural standpoint. In the braided embodiment illustrated herein, two support strand portion pairs are added transverse to and crossing three other support strand pairs, all strand portions of which are bent into S- shaped curves and the extensions from the periphery of the braid are severed.

Braid of the foregoing type is generally formed transverse to the extending direction of the warp of the weave. To change the direction of the integral braid to one generally longitudinal of the warp of the weave, a somewhat different technique is employed. Suitable spaced-apart engaging strands are mounted into a frame member which perform the function of the warp strands which do not project in a direction transverse to the warp of the weave. Thereafter, at least one of the warp strands extending from the transverse braided periphery is bent on alternating sides of the engaging strands until the bent projecting warp strand is proximal to the structural element. Thereafter, a first engaging strand is bent over the projecting warp strand on alternate sides of subsequent engaging strands and this process is repeated with additional warp strand portions projecting from the braid and subsequent engaging strands to form a longitudinal braided periphery. As with the transverse braid, the engaging strands are severed after they have changed directions at least twice to form a generally S-shaped curved portion.

It is preferable to form a braid of the foregoing type generally transverse to the plane of the adjacent woven surface. This T-shaped" configuration with the periphery forming the T crossbar lends considerable structural strength to the piece of furniture.

The materials forming the strands to be incorporated into the above braid are preferably formed of a material which is sufficiently flexible during working to perform the method and sufficiently rigid after being worked so that the transverse braid is capable of providing substantial support for the adjacent periphery of the woven surface. A preferred material for this purpose is imported into Italy from India and is known by the Italian name of secca of a class commonly called Indian cane. This material is workable in a moistened condition and, upon drying, becomes rigid and provides substantial structural strength.

The present invention also includes a piece of woven furniture made in the foregoing manner to include a braided periphery integral with the warp of the weave, additional support strands forming a portion of the braided periphery as described above, and a braided periphery which changes directions from one generally transverse to the warp of the weave to one generally longitudinal thereto.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a view ofa chair partially in outline form illustrating the peripheral braid portion of the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a detailed view partially broken away of the corner of the chair of FIG. 1 illustrated in detail with the warp strands projecting prior to formation into a braid.

FIGS. 3-10 are sequential steps illustrating a method for forming the braided periphery of the present invention.

FIGS. 11-14 are further sequential steps illustrating a method for changing the direction of the braided periphery while retaining the same integral with the warp of the weave.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring to FIGS. 1 and 2, the present invention is illustrated with respect to a chair, having at its corner a vertical frame member 21, front and side bottom frame member portions, 22 and 23, respectively, mounted to said vertical frame member 21 and intermediate front and side frame member portions, 24 and 26, respectively, also mounted at their intersection to vertical frame member 21. The chair also includes suitable cushions 27. The front and side portions of the chair illustrated in FIG. 1 are filled in with woven surfaces 28 and 29, respectively. In the illustrated configuration, the warp of the weave comprises a plurality of vertical warp strands mounted in spaced-apart, side-byside relationship in front and side frame member portion 22 and 23 extending vertically to form the warp of the weave.

The woof of the weave is formed by weaving woof strands 31 on alternate sides of warp strands 30 and are wound around the vertical frame member 21 as illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2 and in more detail in FIG. 14. This type of weave continues around the entire chair in a conventional manner. When the woof strands end they are tucked to the inside of the warp strands and a new woof strand is continued in the weave.

In order to form a braided portion integral with the warp of the weave in accordance with the present invention, woven surfaces 28 and 29 extend only part way up warp strands 30 away from the mounted ends thereof so that a substantial portion of each of the warp strands extends beyond the weave. These warp strand extensions form an integral portion of the braided periphery as set forth hereinafter. Thus, FIG. 2 illustrates the warp strands prior to formation of the braid.

The integral braid according to the present invention may assume any direction with respect to the weave. For example, the braided peripheral portion 32 adjacent front woven surface 28 is generally transverse to the warp strands while the braided peripheral portion 33 adjacent vertical frame member 21 is generally longitudinal of warp strands 30. As used herein, expressions transverse and longitudinal with respect to braided peripheral portions relate to the warp strands as they extend in the woven portion of the chair.

Referring to FIGS. 3-14, a method for forming a preferred integral braided periphery from a structural and aesthetic standpoint in accordance with the present invention is illustrated. It is to be understood that the present invention encompasses in general woven pieces of furniture having braided peripheries integral with the warp of the weave. For convenience of description, the details of the particular braided method of FIGS. 3-10 is set forth herein prior to a more general description of braids according to the invention illustrated in the drawings by referring only to a portion of the strands in the braid of the drawings.

A particular desirable material for use as the woof strands, warp strands, and other strands set forth hereinafter has the properties of flexibility during formation of the furniture and rigidity thereafter to provide support. A particularly suitable material of this type is found in the swamps of India and imported into Italy under the name secca, commonly in the Indian cane class. It is somewhat similar to bamboo but has a solid center and is approximately A inch in diameter. It has the desirable property of being sufflciently flexible to be bent when in a moistened condition and, upon drying, becomes rigid and possesses substantial structural integrity. It typically grows to a length of 20 feet or more.

To carry out the method of the present invention, the secca material from the swamp is dried and shipped to the place of manufacture. Thereafter, it is soaked in liquid for a number of days until it is sufficiently soft to carry out the present method. After doing so, the material dries and hardens into the desired configuration. Thus, the strands are flexible when being worked and become rigid sometime thereafter.

In accordance with the detailed method set forth in the present drawings, a plurality of warp strands are mounted so that portions thereof extend above the woven portion of the piece of furniture as described above and as set forth generally in FIG. 2.

Referring to FIG. 3, in a first step of forming the integral periphery, warp strand extensions 36, 37, and 38, respectively, project from the woven surface in spacedapart, side-by-side relationship. A pair of support strand portions 39 and 40 is positioned between upstanding warp strand extensions 36 and 37 across the plane of the woven surface and proximal to the outer edge thereof.

Referring to FIG. 4, in a second step a second pair of support strand portions 41 and 42 is positioned between warp strand extensions 36 and 37 and over support strand pair 39 and 40 and warp strand extension 36 is bent over support strand portions 39 and 40 to form a bent portion 36a adjacent support strand portion 42.

In this manner, support strand pair 39 and 40 is retained in position against the adjacent woven surface outer edge by warp strand bent portion 36a and support strand portion pair 41, 42.

Referring to FIG. 5, a third step is performed in which a third support pair 43, 44 is positioned between warp strand extensions 37 and 38 and over bent first warp strand portion 36a and support strand portion pair 41, 42.

Referring to FIG. 6, in a fourth step, a fourth support pair portion 46, 47 is positioned between warp strand extensions 37 and 38 and over support strand pair 33, 34. Also, warp strand extension 37 is bent over support strand pair 43, 44 in front of warp strand extension 38 and adjacent support strand portion 47 to form warp strand portion 37a.

Referring to FIG. 7, two more warp strand extensions in progression, 48 and 49, respectively, are illustrated. A fourth support strand pair 50, 51 is positioned between warp strand extensions-38 and 48 and over warp strand bent portion 37a and support strand pair 46, 47 to assist retention of the latter three-named strands in a bent position.

Referring to FIG. 8 in step 6, support strand pair 39, 40 is bent in a curve over both support strand pair 43, 44 and support strand pair 50, 51 in front of warp strand extension 48 to form a bent warp strand pair 39a, 40a. Warp strand extension 38 is also bent in front of warp strand extension 48 to form a bent portion 38a adjacent to support strand bent portion 40a and over support strand pair 50, 51.

Referring to FIG. 9, in a seventh step, support strand portion 42 and adjacent bent warp strand extension 360 are bent to change direction and form curved portions 42a and 36b, respectively, over support strand portion 41, warp strand extension bent portions 37a and 38a, and support strand pairs 46, 47 and 39a, 40a and between warp strand extensions 48 and 49.

Referring to FIG. 10, a sequence of steps is illustrated in which an attractive durable braided portion according to the. present invention is completed. Warp strand portion 36b and adjacent support strand portion 42a are bent back across the plane of the woven surface between subsequent warp strand extensions 52 and 53m form corresponding strand portions 360 and 42b. At this point each of said strands have traveled through at least two changes of direction to form generally S- shaped curved portions which are braided over and under other support strand and warp strand portions in the braid to form the braid illustrated in FIG. 10.

The foregoing procedure is repeated in sequence to form a braided periphery adjacent the woven surface and transverse thereto in which both the warp strand extensions and support strand portions of the braid change directions at least twice to form a generally S- shaped curved portion.

Because additional warp strand portions are incorporated into the braided periphery in the successive line of formation, it is necessary to eliminate prior strands in the braiding process after they have served their braiding function. For this purpose, it has been found that after either the support strand portions or warp strand extensions have changed directions in the braid at least twice to form the above generally S-shaped curved portion that they should be severed and the braid continued with other portions which have not yet been formed into the S-shape configuration. Such severing of strand projections from the braided periphery is illustrated in FIG. 10 by denoting the severed support strand extensions 39a and 43a in phantom..lt is preferable to sever when the strands are between the braid and the woven surface so that they are not exposed on the furniture.

The severed support strands 39a and 43a are not illustrated as traveling through the aforementioned S- shaped curve. Although it is preferable that each strand include a generally S-shapcd curved portion, it is not essential. However, the support strand pairs may be back-braided in a reverse procedure to the one illustrated above until each one of the support strands have proceeded through the aforementioned S-shaped curve.

A woven piece of furniture formed in the above manner includes a plurality of warp strands 30 mounted in spaced-apart, side-by-side relationship by extending in a line along a suitable frame member 22 or 23 and transverse woof strands 31 woven in alternate sides of the warp to form the woof of the weave only partially extending along the warp strands from the mounted ends so that a substantial portion of each of the Warp strands extends beyond the weave.

In the illustrated furniture, support strand portions 39 and 40 project between warp strand extensions 36 and 37. Support strand pair 41, 42 together with warp strand portion 36a are disposed over support strand pair 39, 40. Support strand pair 41, 42 are disposed over support strand pair 39, 40 and warp strand portion 36a to assist retention of the same in a bent position.

Warp 'strand pair 46, 47 are disposed along woof strand portion 37a over support strand pair 43, 44, and in front of warp strand extension 38. Support strand pair 51, 52 are disposed between warp strand extensions 38 and 48 and over warp strand portion 37a and support strand pair 46, 47.

Support strand pair 39, 40 are bent to form pair 39a, 40a over support strand pairs 43, 44 and 50, 51 in front of warp strand extension 48. Warp strand portion 38 is bent to form portion 38a over support strand pair 50, 51 adjacent support strand pair 39a, 40a.

Support strand 42 and warp strand portion 360 are bent over warp strand extension 41, warp strand portions 37a and 38a, and support strand pairs 46, 47 and 39a, 40a in front of warp strand extension 48 and between it and warp strand extension 49. The thusformed support strand portion 42a and warp strand portion 36b are thereafter bent back between warp strand extensions 52 and 54 to form a generally S- shaped curved portion.

Subsequent warp and support strands are bent in the foregoing manner to form a braid along the periphery of the woven surface integral therewith and providing support therefor. It is preferred that each of the warp and support strands are sufficient length to change directions in the braid at least twice to form a generally S-shaped curved portion.

Referring again to FIGS. 1-10, it is apparent that a number of varieties of braid come within the scope of the present concept of forming a portion of a woven piece of furniture having a braided periphery integral with the warp of the weave. For example, in a first simplified form eliminating certain of the illustrated support strand portions and warp strand extensions from consideration, the following method may be employed to form a braid of the foregoing type. However, it should be noted that this braid is not as desirable, structurally or aesthetically, as the one set forth above.

In this first simplified form of braid, one warp strand extension 36 is bent toward the woven surface and in a selected direction. For purposes of the present description, the selected direction is indicated in the drawing as proceeding from left to right. Thereafter, as illustrated in FIG. 10, warp strand 36 is bent on alternate sides of subsequent warp strand extensions 48 and 54 from left to right to form a generally S-shaped curve.

In the above first simplified procedure, warp strand extension 37 is bent generally in the selected direction across warp strand extension 36 in front and in back of warp strand extensions 49 and 52, respectively, to form a generally S-shaped curve.

A procedure of the above first simplified type is repeated in sequence with third and subsequent warp strand extensions to form an integral braided periphery generally transverse to the warp of the weave including the extending portion of the warp strand along the line thereacross. Warp strand portions projecting from the braided periphery after they have changed directions in the braid at least twice are severed to form crossing generally S-shaped curved portions.

In a woven piece of furniture ofthe above first simplified type, the warp and weave are described with respect to the detailed embodiment. Warp strand extension 36 is bent in the selected direction from left to right on alternate sides of warp strand extensions 48 and 54, respectively. A second warp strand, 37, is bent in progression generally in the selected direction on alternate sides of warp strand extensions 49 and 52. Warp strand extensions 36 and 37 proceed a sufficient length to define genrally S-shaped curved portions crossing over each other and third and subsequent warp strands bent in the same manner to form S-shaped curved portions and in composite forming the braid generally transverse to the warp of the weave.

A preferred embodiment of the above woven piece of furniture, the widest portion of the braided periphery is transverse to the woven surface ina generally T- shaped configuration to provide structural support therefor.

It should be noted that one, two, or more support strand portions or pairs of the foregoing type may be incorporated into the first simplified braid described above with respect to the warp strand extensions only. For example, a first support strand pair 39, 40 is posi tioned to the selected direction side of first warp strand extension 36 transverse to the woven surface prior to bending warp strand 36 toward the woven surface as set forth above, whereby the latter strand is bent over the former one. Thereafter, a second support strand pair 41, 42 is positioned over the first support strand pair 39, 40 adjacent bent warp strand portion 36a and bent together therewith as described above with respect to the warp strand. In the above manner, support strand pairs 39, 40 and 41, 42 are incorporated into the described series of steps and thus into the braided periphery to provide support therefor. Portions of the first and second support strand pairs 39, 40 and 41, 42 projecting from the braided periphery are severed after they have changed directions at least twice to form a generally S-shaped curved portion.

A third simplified braid and method of manufacture more simplified than the one illustrated in FIG. l-10 and more detailed than the first simplified one is described briefly at this point. The method of forming the woven portion at the warp strand extensions is generally the same as that described with respect to FIGS. 1 and 2 and so will not be repeated at this point. The described method includes three strand pairs instead of the five strand pairs illustrated with respect to the detailed embodiment of FIGS. 1-10.

A method for forming a braided periphery integral with the warp of the weave according to the above third simplified method is as follows. Referring to FIG. 1, support strand pair 39, 40 is positioned to the right of a first warp strand extension 36 and across the plane of the woven surface and proximal to an outer edge thereof. Warp strand extension 36 is bent in the selected direction to place warp strand pair 39, 40 between warp strand portion 36 and the woven surface.

A second support strand pair 41, 42 is disposed over the first support strand pair 39, 40 along first warp strand bent portion 36a and support strand portion 42 is bent together with warp strand portion 36a to the right of warp strand extension 48 transverse to the plane of the woven surface.

A third support strand pair, 50, SI is positioned to the left of warp strand extension 48 and the last three named strands are bent to the right over warp strand portion 36b and support strand portion 42a.

Thereafter, the foregoing steps are repeated in sequence to form a braided periphery integral with the woven surface and adjacent thereto. As briefly discussed, strand portions projecting from the braided periphery are severed after they change direction in the braid at least twice to form generally S-shaped curved portions.

A woven piece of furniture according to the above second simplified method is formed when first and second support strand portions are incorporated into the aforementioned simplified description relating only to warp strand extension by carrying out the above method incorporating such warp strand portions. Referring to the above description of the furniture including only warp strand extensions, a first support strand pair 39, 40 is positioned to the selected direction side of the first warp strand extension 39, 40 between the first warp strand extension bent portion 36a and the outer edge of the woven surface. A second support strand pair 41, 42 is positioned over support strand pair 39, 40 and bent in a pairing with warp strand portion 36a. The support strands 39, 40, 41, and 42 travel a sufficient distance in the braid to change directions at least twice to form a generally S-shaped curved portion and serve to provide additional support for the braided periphery.

A woven piece of furniture formed according to any of the foregoing procedures includes the braided portion integral with the warp of the weave and generally in a T-shaped configuration with the widest portion of the braid forming the crossbar of the T. This lends considerable structural stability to the woven piece of furniture to an extent that an additional frame portion is not necessary. In addition, because the braided periphery is integral with the weave, even extremely hard wear does not tend to separate the two. The furniture may be a chair, as described, or a couch, table, or the like.

A piece of furniture of any of the foregoing types includes a braided periphery integral with the warp of the weave and generally transverse thereto. In order to carry out the foregoing method, it is necessary to have warp strand extensions available for braiding. The invention also contemplates changing the direction of the integral braid to one generally longitudinal of the warp of the weave in which warp strand extensions are not available. As generally illustrated in the corner of the chair illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2, the braided peripheral portion 32 adjacent front woven surface 28 turns about 90 to form the generally vertical braided peripheral portion 33 adjacent vertical frame member 21 and generally longitudinal of warp strands 30 and thereafter again turns direction transverse of the warp strands. Braided peripheral portion 33 does not have any projecting warp strands adjacent thereto. The following procedure illustrates one method according to the invention to change the direction of braided portion 32 to braided portion 33.

Referring to FIG. 11, the portion of the braided periphery 32 transverse to the warp strands is illustrated at an end adjacent to vertical frame element 21. For simplicity of description, all strands in a transverse braided periphery 32 will be referred to generally as strands which are intended to be either support strands or warp strand extensions. It should be understood that the origin of the above strands is immaterial to the description of changing the direction of the braid.

Referring again to FIG. 11, frame member 21 is illustrated as including openings 21a into which are mounted one end of each of a plurality of spaced-apart engaging strands designated 60-66, inclusive, in succession, from the bottom end adjacent braided periphcry 32 to the top end thereof. The engaging strands are preferably formed of the same type of material set forth above with respect to the warp strands and support strands. The woof of the weave is illustrated as weaving to the alternate sides of vertically extending warp strands and winding a number of times around frame member 21 prior to returning to the weave as described above.

In general, the method of changing direction of the braided periphery to that of portion 33 comprises utilizing the foregoing engaging strand as substitutes for warp strand extensions and incorporating the same into the braid. For simplicity, the method illustrated in FIG. 11-14 will be first described in detail.

As illustrated in FIG. 11, braid 32 includes (a) strand pairs 70, 71 and adjacent severed strand portion 72, (b) strand pair 73, 74 and adjacent projecting strand 76, (c) strand pair 77, 78 and projecting strand 79 adjacent thereto, (d) strand pair 80, 81 and adjacent strand 82, (e) strand pair 83, 84 and (f) vertical warp strand 86. The foregoing strands are formed into a braid in the manner described above and as illustrated in FIG. 11.

In FIG. 12, strands 83 and 84 are bent over strands 70 and 71 and, together with strand 86 are bent to a position to the right side of and below engaging strand 60 proceeding generally in the selected direction. Strand pair 77, 78 is bent over adjacent projecting strand 79 and through the first two engaging strands 60 and 61 over adjacent strands 83, 84 and 86 to retain the same in the braid and to project generally thereacross. In this manner, the beginning of the braid traveling along vertical frame member 21 is established with braid 32 including strand pairs 77, 78 and 82, 83 being bent in alternate directions about engaging strands 60.

Referring to FIG. 13, strand pair 70, 71 together with engaging strand 60 are bent over strand pairs 73, 74 and 77, 78, and across member 21 below the next engaging strand 61 in succession. Thereafter, strands 81, 82 are bent over adjacent strands 60, and 71 and between projecting engaging strands 61 and 62.

By repeating the foregoing procedure of integrating successive engaging strands along frame member 21 into the braid portion 32, and thereafter braiding the same in the foregoing manner, a strand portion along frame member 21 is formed generally longitudinal to the projecting warp strands. As with the warp and support strands, as illustrated in FIG. 14, the majority of the engaging strands in braid portion 33 are severed after they have changed directions at least twice to form a generally S-shaped curved portion.

It is noted that the engaging strands are illustrated as being mounted into holes 21a in frame member 21. This is merely a convenient end point for the engaging strands and it is to be understood that such strands may be mounted therein either before or after incorporation into the braided periphery.

Referring to FIG. 14, it is noted that braided portion 33 changes directions at its forward end to one generally transverse to the warp strand to form the back of the chair in the illustrated embodiment. The integral braided periphery in the back of the chair is integral with the adjacent warp strand extensions similar to braided periphery 32.

A simplified method for changing the direction of the transverse integral braided peripheral portion of a portion 33 generally longitudinal to the warp of the weave is illustrated in the drawing with reference to only certain of the strands in braid 32 and to the aforementioned strands mounted in spaced-apart, side-by-side relationship. One of the strands 78 projecting from braided periphery 32 is bent in the general selected direction toward frame member 21 and behind a first engaging strand 60. Thereafter, strand 78 is bent on alternating sides of the engaging strand until it is proximal to frame member 21 as seen in FIG. 14.

The first engaging strand 60 is bent over and across projecting strand 78 as also illustrated in FIG. 13. Thereafter, strand 60 is bent on alternate sides of subsequent engaging strand along the progressive line as generally illustrated in FIG. 14 thereby assisting retention of strand 78 in a bent position between strand 60 and the frame member 21.

The above two steps are repeated in sequence with additional strand portions projecting from braided periphery 32 and subsequent engaging strands along the progression line of the frame member to form a braided periphery 33 generally longitudinal to the warp of the weave. Thereafter, the majority of the engaging strands are severed from the longitudinal braided periphery after they have changed directions at least twice to form a generally S-shaped curved portion.

A braid of the above simplified type including a portion extending generally longitudinal of the warp of the weave may be incorporated into any of the foregoing furniture including a transverse integral braid 32. It ineludes frame member 21 with a plurality of engaging strands 60-66 inclusive mounted in spaced-apart, sideby-side relationship in a progressive line along the frame member. At least one of the strands 78 projecting from the braided periphery 32 in the selected direction is bent toward frame member 21 to the right side of engaging strand 60 and between it and engaging strand 61. One of the engaging strands 60 is bent over the projecting strand 78 on alternate sides of subsequent engaging strands along the progressive line as generally illustrated in FIGS. 13 and 14. Additional strands projecting from braid 32 are bent in the manner of the first strand 78 while subsequent engaging strands along the progressive line are bent in the manner of the first engaging strand 60 to form a braided periphery generally longitudinal to the warp of the weave. The majority of the engaging strands are of sufficient length to change directions at least twice to form a generally S-shaped curved portion.

It is apparent from the foregoing that a method has been provided for forming a portion of a woven piece of furniture having a braided periphery integral with the warp of the weave and extending about the entire periphery of the furniture. This feature renders the furniture both attractive and durable. Techniques have been described for changing the direction from one transverse to the warp of the weave to one longitudinal thereto. It should be apparent that modifications of the specific braids described herein may be made without departing from the scope of the present invention.

We claim:

1. [n a woven piece of furniture of high structural stability, having a frame member a first quantity of strands, means for mounting one end of said strands in spaced-apart, side-by-side relationship extending in a sequential line from left to right to form the warp of a weave, a second quantity of adjacent strands operatively associated with said frame member woven on alternate sides of said warp strands to form the woof of the weave extending only partially along said warp strands from said mounted end so that a substantial portion of each of said warp strands extends beyond said weave, said warp and weave defining a woven surface, a first one of said warp strand extensions being bent in a selected direction in progression on alternate sides of subsequent ones of said warp strand extensions in said line, a second one of said warp strand extensions in progression being bent generally in said selected direction across said bent first warp strand extension on alternate sides of subsequent ones of said warp strand extensions in said line, third and subsequent strands being bent in the manner of said first and second warp strands forming a braid generally transverse to the warp of the weave and comprising the extending portion of said warp strands along the periphery of the woven surface integral therewith and providing support therefor, the majority of said warp strand portions which project from said transverse braided periphery changing directions at least twice to form a generally S-shaped curved portion in the braid.

2. A woven piece of furniture as in claim 1 in which the widest portion of said braided periphery is transverse to said woven surface to provide structural support therefor.

3. A woven piece of furniture as in claim 1 in which said warp strands are formed from a material which is flexible in a wet condition and sufficiently rigid in a dry condition to provide substantial support for the adjacent periphery of said woven surface.

4. The woven piece of furniture of claim 1 comprising, in addition, a first and second support strand portion, said first support strand portion being positioned to the selected direction side of said first warp strand portion between said first warp strand bent portion and the outer edge of said woven surface, said second support strand portion being positioned over said first support strand portion adjacent said first warp strand bent portion and being bent in a pairing with first warp strand portion, said first and second support strand portions traveling a sufficient distance in said braid to change directions at least twice to form a generally S- shaped curved portion and serving to provide additional support for said braided periphery.

5. A woven piece of furniture as in claim 4 including a third and fourth support strand portion adjacent said first and second support strand portions, respectively, to form first and second support strand pairs in the same general position in the braid of claim 4 as said first and second support strand portions.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification297/451.9, 297/452.64
International ClassificationA47C5/00, D03D41/00, A47C5/02
Cooperative ClassificationA47C5/02, D03D41/002
European ClassificationD03D41/00B, A47C5/02