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Publication numberUS3793156 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 19, 1974
Filing dateNov 21, 1972
Priority dateNov 21, 1972
Publication numberUS 3793156 A, US 3793156A, US-A-3793156, US3793156 A, US3793156A
InventorsBarry G, Kanengieter G
Original AssigneeOwatonna Mfg Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Automatic hood system
US 3793156 A
Abstract
An automatic hood system for distributing material such as hay, straw, etc. in which the distribution assembly is mounted on the end of a conveying pipe and includes a motor adapted to rotate the entire assembly through a range of limited pivotal movement on the end of the pipe and to raise and lower deflecting hood sections included therein simultaneously with the pivotal movement of the entire hood assembly.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Kanengieter et al.

[451 Feb. 19, 1974 1 AUTOMATIC HOOD SYSTEM [75] Inventors: Glenn G. Kanengieter, Blooming Prairie; Gerald E. Barry, Owatonna, both of Minn.

[73] Assignee: Owatonna Manufacturing Co., Inc., Owatonna, Minn.

[22] Filed: Nov. 21, 1972 [21] Appl. No.: 308,530

[52] US. Cl. 302/60, 302/61 [51] Int. Cl. B65g 53/40 [58] Field of Search 302/9, 10, 60, 61

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,750,235 6/1956 Frushour 302/61 3,495,878 2/1970 Hanaya 302/61 2,780,498 2/1957 Zygmuntowski... 302/61 X 3,202,462 8/1965 Segredo 302/61 3,423,132 l/l969 Blanton et al. 302/61 633,561 9/1899 Bartholomew 302/10 X FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 420,983 3/1967 Switzerland 302/60 Primary ExaminerRichard E. Aegerter Assistant ExaminerW. Scott Carson Attorney, Agent, or FirmSchroeder Siegfried Ryan and Vidas [57] ABSTRACT An automatic hood system for distributing material such as hay, straw, etc. in which the distribution assembly is mounted on the end of a conveying pipe and includes a motor adapted to rotate the entire assembly through a range of limited pivotal movement on the end of the pipe and to raise and lower deflecting hood sections included therein simultaneously with the pivotal movement of the entire hood assembly.

8 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures PATENTEB FEB I 91974 SHEET 3 OF 4 PAIENIEU FEB 1 91974 SHEET l 0F 4' hvN AUTOMATIC noon SYSTEM Our invention relates to a distribution hood assembly and more particularly to an automatic hood system for directing air borne material into a container in which the hood assembly is rotated on the end of the pipe and hood sections thereof are simultaneously moved to deflect material therethrough.

Distribution hoods used in connection with hay stackers or the transmission of air borne material into a container to distribute the material thereon are known and in use. Such hood assemblies normally incorporate some type of deflecting means for varying the flow of material from the end of the hood and these have been manually and in certain instances automatically actuated or automatically adjusted. Similarly, the flow pipe through which the material flows has been oscillated through an arcuate or pivotal type movement necessitating a complicated suspended mounting of the blower and portion of the machine associated therewith for such pivotal movement with the pipe thereon. This provided a complex arrangement and suspended a large number of parts having significant weight through complicated journaling and bearing assemblies for which input motion to the blower had to be directed. Consequently, such apparatus was complex, cumbersome and required significant maintenance. Such units have been manually operated or motor operated or adjusted. In each instance, the complication in the structure limited the application thereof, increased the cost and maintenance of the same and generally necessitated additional operators for operating the same to provide for uniform stacking of the material in the container associated therewith.

In the present invention a simplified automatic hood system or distribution hood assembly is provided in which the hood on the end of a fixed pipe is rotated through an arcuate path to either side of a reference position and deflecting sections within the hood are pivoted simultaneously to vary the deflection of flow of material therefrom for the purpose of uniformly distributing material in a container automatically and without the requirement of an operator. This simplified structure is less cumbersome and relatively maintenance free and permits the entire harvesting and stacking operation to be effected by a single operator.

Therefore it is the principal object of this invention to provide an improved automatic hood system for distribution apparatus such as haystackers, straw stackers and stover stackers.

Another object of this invention is to provide in an improved hood system, a simplified arrangement in which a single motor may drive the hood assembly for rotation about the end of a fixed pipe and rotate or pivot deflecting portions thereof simultaneously to provide for uniformity of distribution of material therefrom into a container.

A further object of this invention is to provide a simplified apparatus of this typewhich is relatively low in cost and maintenance free and requires no operator to effect operation of the same.

These and other objects of this invention become apparent from a reading of the attached description together with the drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is a schematic view in sideelevation of a blowing and stacking apparatus showing an application-for the improved hood assembly;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the hood assembly on the end of a distribution pipe;

FIG. 3 is a side elevation view of the hood assembly with parts in section;

FIG. 4 is a sectional view of a portion of the hood assembly of FIG. 3 taken along the lines 4-4 therein;

FIG. 5 is a sectional view of a portion of the apparatus of FIG. 3 taken along the lines 55 therein; and

FIG. 6 is a side elevation view of an alternate embodiment of the hood assembly and a drive therefore.

Our improved automatic distribution hood assembly is shown schematically in FIG. 1' in connection with a pickup or harvesting device, indicated generally at 10, which is adapted to be drawn by any draft vehicle such as a tractor, truck or equivalent structure. For the purpose of the present disclosure the pick-up drum 12 is adapted to pick up material, such as hay or straw or silage, which has been cut or is simultaneously cut with the pickup operation and directed into a blower section indicated generally at 15. The blower section has an upwardly extending pipe 20 rigidly connected thereto with a curved upper extremity 22. The entire assembly is operated through a suitable drive mecha nism, indicated generally at 25, and the details'of the pick-up drive and blower form no part of the present invention.

The material picked up or harvested is generally directed to a container such as a stack forming structure, indicated generally at 30, which may be physically connected to the harvesting structure or drawn as a separate vehicle behind the same. The pipe will direct the material such as the silage, straw, or hay or equivalent material from the blower under the influence of airflow or air pressure into the container for stacking and/or transporting purposes. Attached to the end of the pipe which is rigidly secured to the blower frame and blower is a distribution hood assembly, indicated generally at 40. The latter has movable parts and is tiltable, as will be hereinafter noted, for the purpose of spreading the tional views in FIGS. 3, 4 and 5 of the drawings. As will be seen in FIGS. 2 and 3 the end of the pipe 20 remote from the blower mounts a plurality of roller members 42 each journaled on a flange 44 which is suitably secured to the end of the pipe in a vertical plane to define an area of mounting and rotation for the hood assembly. The rollers are grooved and adapted to receive an annular rim section 45 of a cylindrical hood section of the hood assembly, the peripheral edges of the flange section being semicircular in cross section to fit in the semicircular grooves and support the hood section 50 for rotation in the rollers 42. Also attached to the end of the pipe is a downwardly defending flange which is suitably secured to the pipe, such as by welding or other means, the flange carrying a slot 62 therein with a suitable closure bracket 64 at one end of the same. Thehood is formed of a plurality of hood sections the first section 50 being a generally cylindrical structure with the annular transversely extending flange 45 at the end of the same which fits over the end of the pipe and is formed with an axis concentric with the axis of the end of the pipe defining a journal axis of pivot for rotative movement of the hood section on the roller guides 42. The hood assembly includes a plurality of additional sections 52, 53 and which are generally U shaped or curved in form with the ends of each of the sections being pivoted on pivot pins 70 and mounted on hood section on either side of the hood assembly. The individual sections 50, 52 and 53 have flexible straps 80 connected between the same along their curved extent and between the pivot points for the individual hood sections. The hood section 50 has a wedge shaped stream divider plate 51 positioned internally and adjacent section 52 which is aligned with the straps 80. The outer hood sections 52 and 53 include an additional defleeting cap 54 and 57 suitably welded or formed thereon. The entire hood assembly is adapted to be pivoted on the pivot pins journaled on section 50. Thus, the hood sections 52 and 53 thereof open and close with the hood sections telescopically fitting together to define a generally straight through pipe without deflection in the closed position and to a position in which the sections are separated from one another arcuately as determined by the length of the flexible straps connecting the same and defining a curved arcuate deflecting path for the material passing through the end of the I pipe. The hood sections are moved relative to one another through pivotal movement of a flange plate which is journaled on the pivot pins 70 extending through the ends of the hood sections and secured to the outermost hood section 53. The plates which are positioned on either side of the pivot points of the hood sections are connected at a point opposite or remote from the pivot pin 70 through a pivotal linkage 92 to a generally U shaped lever member 95 which moves vertically or longitudinally up and down to pivot the entire hood assembly and hence, the individual hood sections on the section 50 since the pivot pins 70 extent therethrough. As the hood sections are moved to the collapsed position, the individual flanges will engage one another with arcuate or pivotal movement of the plates 70 upon upward or longitudinal movement of the U shaped lever 95 to pivot the individual sections and collapse the hood to the uppermost position with the uppermost limit of movement of the U shaped lever member 95 and the limit of pivotal movement of the plates 90. I

The actuating mechanism for the hood assembly is a hydraulic motor indicated at which is carried by a plate 101 and secured thereto by bolts 104. A shaft 105 extending from the motor mounts a drive pinion thereon. The rotary motor which is of the hydraulic type has suitable flexible hose members connected thereto to provide for flow of hydraulic fluid from the hydraulic transmission associated with the harvester or draft equipment. As will be best seen in the sectional view of FIG. 4, the pinion 110 cooperates with a continuous roller chain which is positioned around an idler roller 122 mounted in the plate 101 through a suitable stubshaft, such as is indicated at 125. The roller members also pass over a driven sprocket which is also suitably journaled in ajournal bearing block mounted on plate 101. The chain has connected thereto a bracket 136 having a pin 137 extending therefrom and the pin extends through the slot 62 in the plate 60 with suitable guide plates 138 positioned on either side ofthe same to retain the pin'in the slots. The pin 137 being attached to the roller chain 120 will rotate around the idler sprocket 122 and over the driven sprocket 130 in an orbital path with motion imparted to the chain through the driven sprocket 110 driven by the motor 100. Since the plate 101 is directly connected to the section 50 of the hood assembly, this entire structure of orbital mechanism will pivot the hood section and hence, the remaining portion of the hood sections 52 and 53 of the hood assembly 40 on the rollers 42 as the pin connected to the chain moves around the orbital path defined by the sprockets 110, 130 and the idler sprocket 122. This path is generally triangular shaped in form and has a reference position in which the axis of the idler sprocket 122, the slot 62 and the pin 137 align in a vertical plane, this being in a position in which the hood assembly is in the reference position wherein discharge through the hood section will be in the same planes as the discharge through the end of the pipe and hence, no sidewise deflection of the material other than downward deflection with extension of the hood sections will take place. The range of limited movement or limited pivotal movement or rotative movement will be defined by the physical displacement of the sprockets 110, 130 to either side of this reference position. The orbital path is generally triangular shaped in form as will be seen in FIGS. 2 and 4 and the entire hood assembly will rotate on the end of the pipe 20 through a limited range of pivotal movement to either side of the reference position.

As will be best seen in FIGS. 3 and 5, the driven sprocket 130 has associated therewith a shaft extending through the bearing block 135 and mounting a second driven sprocket 140 on the opposite side of the plate 101. These driven sprockets 130 and 140 together with a shaft 134 which mount the same are supported on the plate I01 through the bearing block 135. The shaft 134 mounts a pivot plate 102 with the second driven sprocket I40 positioned on the exposed surface of the same. A drive chain is fitted over the sprocket I40 and extends across the surface of the plate 102 to a sprocket 148 mounted on a stubshaft 150 positioned on the pivot plate 102 to be movable therewith. The stubshaft 150 mounts a second sprocket which in turn carries a drive chain to an additional driven sprocket 170, also journaled on the plate 102 through a suitable bearing block 172. The drive chain has a bracket 178 mounted thereon which carries a pin 180 mounted thereon. A second bracket 182 having a journaling collar 181 attached thereto is mounted on the pin 180 through the collar 181 with the lower extremity or opposite extremity of the bracket 182 having an aperture therethrough which a pin 185 extends. This extremity of the bracket is pivoted on the pin 185 and the pin 185 is rigidly attached to a plate carried by the U shaped lever member 95. As will be best seen in FIG.

5, the plate 190 is attached or suitably secured to the generally U shaped bracket 95 such as by welding and extends below the, same. Rotation of the driven sprocket 160 on the stubshaft 150 through movement of the chain 145 will cause movement of the chain 165 and hence, the bracket 178 attached thereto. The journaling collar 181 of the bracket 182 or the rod type bearing member mounted on the pin 180 will thus move with the bracket 178 to cause movement of the bracket 182 longitudinally. Its lower extremity which is pivotally connected to the plate 190 through the pivot 185 will move the U shaped bracket member 95 attached thereto and consequently impart longitudinal motion to the plates 90 attached to the ends of the outer hood section 53. This generally vertical or longitudinal movement of the bracket 182 attached to the pin 180 due to rotation of the sprockets 160, 170 with the chain 165 thereon will cause the U shaped bracket member 95 to move up and down pivoting the hood sections through the connection of the plates with the hood section 53. The movement of the hood section 53 in an upward direction will cause all of the hood sections to move to a collapsed position or an open position for the hood sections with a minimum of downward deflection of the material passing therethrough. Downward movement of the plates 90 through downward movement of the U shaped bracket member 95 will cause the hood section 53 to pivot downward and the section 52 connected thereto to similarly move downward so that a maximum of deflection in the vertical position will be effected on the material passing through the hood structure. This upward or downward movement of the U shaped bracket member causing collapsing or opening of the hood section will take place with rotation of the motor 100 causing rotation of the driven sprocket 130 having the driven sprocket 140 on its common shaft thereby causing driving movement of the chain 145 to the stubshaft assembly 150 with the sprockets 148 and 160 thereon. The rotation of the sprocket 160 on the stubshaft rotates the chain 165 and the sprocket 170 in the form of an eccentric mechanism which causes the chain 165 and the pin 180 to give a generally vertical movement to the bracket or link 182 and hence, the U shaped member 95 attached thereto through the plate 190 from its oblong path of movement.

The plate 102 which is pivotally mounted on the shaft 134 is adapted to pivot or move relative to the plate 101 and hence, the entire stubshaft assemblies and sprockets carrying the plate 190 and the arm 95 with the same. As will be seen in FIG. 5, a suitable ram 191 is pivotally mounted on the plate 101 through a suitable bracket assembly 192, the ram being controlled through an electric controller 195 attached to the end of the same with the arm 196 of the ram being pivotally connected to the plate 102 as at 197. The range of movement of the pin 180 on the drive chain 165 is limited by the relative positioning of the sprockets 160, 170 mounting the chain. Hence, the upward and downward movement of the plate 190 attached to the bracket 1'82 and connected to the pin 180 will be similarly limited such that the upward and downward movement or longitudinal movement of the U shaped bracket member 95 connected to the hood section 53 will be so limited in its movement. By pivotingthe plate assembly 102, the up and down limits of the range of movement of the U shaped bracket member 95 attached to the hood section 53 will be raised or lowered. The ram 191 is energized from an electrical source of power, such as is indicated by the conductor 198, and the length or extension of the shaft 196 causing pivotal movement of the plate 102 on the plate 101 will raise or lower this range of movement of the U shaped bracket member and hence, the hood section 53. Thus, the working range of the pin 180 can be raised or lowered by extending or retracting the ram 191 which pivots the plate 102 about the shaft 134 on the plate 101. The ram length is shortened for filling the lower part of a box or increasing the deflection of the material through the hood and extended for filling the intermediateheights of the box or for an intermediate range of deflection of the hood assembly. When fully extended, the flow through the hood section or its range of movement will be effective for topping off a stack within the box into which the material from the hood section is directed. The length of the arm 196 of the ram is a gauge for an operator in operating the hood in filling the box or container for the haystack former. An indicating gauge arm 188 attached to plate 102 and projecting out to the side of the hood assembly will indicate to an operator the position of the ram 191 and hence, plate 102. The stubshaft 150 which mounts the second sprocket 160 and in turn the drive chain 165 and the additional driven sprocket 170 is all journaled on the plate 102 and will be movable therewith.

Thus with the energization of the rotary motor through hydraulic fluid from a suitable source through the lines 115, the driven sprocket for the orbital chain drive as defined by the chain and idler sprocket 122 and driven sprocket will cause rotation of the entire hood assembly in a plane defined by the roller guides 42 mounted on the end of the pipe 20. Since the plate 60 is fixed, the orbital movement of the pin 137 attached to the chain will cause sliding movement of the pin in the slot 62 in the plate 60 and rotate the entire assembly to either side of the reference position of alignment of the parts. Simultaneously with this movement, the motor 100 through the driven sprocket 130 will cause movement of the sprocket 140 to drive the stubshaft assembly and hence the sprocket 170 with the pinned roller chain to move the U shaped bracket member 95 longitudinally up and down pivoting the plates 90. The plates which are connected to the hood section 53 pivoted on the fixed hood section 50 will pivot with such movement. The plate 102 adjusts the limits of the range of movement of the hood sections by pivoting through operation of its ram to effec tively raise or lower the entire assembly carried thereby. The plate 102 pivots on the shaft 134 which is common to the sprockets 130 and 140 and is journaled in the plate 101. Attached to the plate 102 are the stubshafts 150 and 172 carrying the sprockets 150 and 170 and the chain 165. This entire assembly is connected through the pin 180 mounted on the bracket 178 and carried by the chain to the bracket I82 and plate 190 connected to the U shaped bracket member 95. Thus, the chain 165 traveling around the sprockets 150, gives-a generally up and down or longitudinal motion to the pin which up and down range of movement is limited by the spacing between the sprockets 160 and 170. The working range of the pin can be raised or lowered by extending or retracting the ram 191 pivoting the plate 102 carrying the entire assembly. The ram length is shortened to cause the maximum downward pivot or tilt of the plate 102 and hence, the lower limit of the range of movement causing the greatest deflection of the 'hood which provides for the maximum of deflection of material flowing through the hood assembly. This is used for filling the lower part of a stack former as previously defined. By raising the plate 102 to an intermediate position through an intermediate extension of the ram 191, an

elevated lower limit of range of movement of the hood assembly is effected with the raising of the upper limit of the range of movement to provide for less deflection of the material through the hood assembly. This is used for filling the middle or interior height of the stack former. With the fully extended ram 191, the range of movement of the hood sections is elevated on the entire assembly to a point where a minimum of deflection is effected through the hood assembly. This setting will be used for the filling of a top of a stack former over the topping of the same. Thus, an operator by adjusting the length of the shaft 196 of the ram 191 may adjust the hood assembly or the range of movement of the same which takes place automatically with operation of the motor 100 for various ranges of oscillation or differing degrees of deflection of the material therethrough to effect a uniform filling of the stack box by varying deflections of the material flowing through the hood assembly.

The alternate embodiment of FIG. 6 shows a simplified version of the automatic hood assembly mounted on the end of the discharge pipe 22. Thus, the hood assembly shown generally at 40 includes the fixed section 50 having the flange 45 thereon guided by rollers 42 mounted on flanges 44 positioned on the end of the pipe. The hood assembly includes the sections 52, 53 with the deflecting hood sections 54, 57 thereon each pivoted respectively on the hood section 50 through the pivot structure 70. The hood assembly in this embodiment includes a pair of hydraulic or pneumatic actuators 220 and 240 mounted on the hood assembly to rotate the same relative to the end of the pipe and to pivot the hood sections 52, 53 relative to the hood section 50. Thus as will be shown in FIG. 6 schematically, the motor 220 includes a cylinder 221 and a shaft portion 222 with the shaft portion being connected to the hood section 50 through a suitable pivotal coupling indicated at 225. The cylinder portion includes a projecting flange 226 which mounts a pin 227 pivotally mounted on upstanding flanges 228 connected to the end of the pipe 222. Thus, extension and retraction of the shaft 222 with respect to the cylinder 221 will rotate the hood assembly relative to the end of the pipe.

The pneumatic or hydraulic actuator mounts a revers-.

ing control 230 having outlet passages 23], 232 connected to the respective ends of the cylinder 221 and with flexible input connections 210 connected thereto and leading to the fixed supply connections 200 positioned on the pipe. Thus, the flexible connections 210 are allowed to pivot relative to the pipe connections 200 to provide a source of fluid, either hydraulic or pneumatic, with a return passage to the reversing control. The reversing control includes a linkage connection, indicated schematically at 235, which is attached to the end of the shaft 222 and to the body of the reversing control 230 to provide a reversing or limit function to the reversing control which is primarily a four way valve with a suitable pilot limit control for reversing fluid passages from the flexible connections 210 to the interior of the reversing control and hence, reversing the flow passages 231 and 232 with respect to the cylinder. With the simplified linear actuator, the fully retracted position will represent one extreme of rotative movement of the hood assembly with respect to the end of the pipe and the fully extended position of the shaft will represent the opposite extremity of pivotal movement of the hood assembly with respect to the pipe and the intermediate or midway position being the reference position of the hood assembly with respect to the end of the discharge pipe. The hydraulic actuator 240 includes a cylinder 241 pivotally mounted on an upstanding flange 242 connected to the hood section 50 to be movable therewith. The shaft extremity 244 of the hydraulic cylinder is connected to a flange 245 through a pivotal connection and to the section 53 of the hood assembly. A suitable reversing control indicated schematically at 250 is mounted on the actuator 240 and includes outlet passages 25], 252 leading to opposite extremities of the ram or cylinder for the purpose of reversing flow thereto. Input connections in the form of flexible conduits 205 connected to the fixed conduits 200 of the pneumatic or hydraulic supply will power the reversing control. A suitable mechanical linkage, indicated at 260, connects the end of the shaft 244 to the reversing control to effect reversing of the same. Thus, with this simplified motor arrangement for the hood assembly, a pair of motors connected from a common source and operating simultaneously and continuously through reversing controls will effect pivoting of the hood sections 52, 53 with respect to the hood section 50 to deflect material therethrough. The motor 220 will simultaneously effect pivoting of the entire hood assembly with respect to the pipe to provide an oscillating or orbital discharge through the hood assembly from the end of the pipe. As in the prior embodiment, suitable straps connect the respective hood sections 50, 52 and 53 to insure simultaneous and pivotal movement of the sections 52, 53 with movement of the actuator 240 in one direction or the other to collapse or extend the hood assembly sections.

This improved hood assembly provides for deflecting of flow of material such as hay, straw, silage, etc. through the end of the pipe in such a manner as to define a uniform stack within the container. As suggested in FIG. 1, the pick up of hay and the blowing of the same into the stack forming structure 30 is such that the improved hood assembly will be oscillating and deflecting on the end of the dischargepipe 20 continuously to uniformly distribute the hay within the stack former or container to provide for an improved stack of uniform density and shape suitable for storage and transportation purposes.

In considering this invention it should be remembered that the present disclosure is illustrative only and the scope of the invention should be determined by the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A distribution hood assembly for directing air borne material into a container comprising, a pipe adapted to receive and convey loose material under air pressure from a blower, a hood assembly mounted on the end of the pipe remote from the blower, means journaling the hood assembly for rotative movement on the end of the pipe on an axis coincident with the axis of the cylindrical pipe at said end thereof, a rotary motor mounted on the hood assembly, means including an orbital drive connected to the rotary motor and coupling the hood assembly to the end of the pipe to rotate the hood assembly through limited pivotal movement to either side of a reference position on said pipe and about said coincident axis,said orbital drive for the hood assembly being a roller chain driven by the rotary motor and having a pin thereon slidably mounted in a plate carried by the end of the pipe, said hood assembly including a plurality of pivotally connected hood sections to deflect material flow therethrough, pivoted lever means connected to the hood sections to pivot. the same through a predetermined range of pivotal movement to variably deflect material from said pipe, additional drive means including an eccentric mechanism coupling the rotary motor with the pivoted lever mechanism to cause pivoting of the hood sections with pivotal rotation of the hood assembly, said eccentric mechanism including additional roller chain with a pin thereon coupled to a pivot link which is connected to the pivoted lever means to transmit the orbital motion of the pin to linear motion causing pivoted movement of the pivoted lever means for pivoting the hood sections, said orbital drive means of the hood assembly being mounted on a first plate and the additional drive means of the hood assembly being mounted on a second plate pivotally connected to the first plate with the linear motion imparted to the pivoted lever means having a fixed range of movement, and including means for adjusting the position of the second plate relative to the first plate to shift the fixed range of movement of the pivoted lever means and the hood sections relative to the end of the pipe.

2. The distribution hood assembly of claim 1 in which the roller chain of the orbital drive is positioned over a plurality of idler rollers to define an orbital path which has a triangular shape.

3. The distribution hood assembly of claim 1 in which the additional drive means includes a second roller chain driven from the first named roller chain and a third roller chain driven from the second roller chain with the third roller chain having a pin thereon coupled to the lever means for pivoting the hood sections.

4. The distribution hood assemlby ofclaim l in which the hood sections are connected together with a flexible strap to hold the sections in a relative position.

5. The distribution hood assembly of claim 1 in which the rotary motor is a rotary hydraulic motor.

6. The distribution hood assembly of claim 1 in which the means for adjusting the position of the second plate is a motor means.

7. The distribution hood assembly of claim 6 in which the motor means mounted on the hood assembly for rotating the hood assembly through limited pivotal movement and for pivoting the hood sections is a rotary hydraulic motor and the motor means adjustably position ing the second plate to shift the fixed range of movement of the lever means and the hood sections is an electric motor adapted to be selectively energized independent of the operation of the rotary hydraulic motor.

8. A distribution hood assembly for directing air borne material into a container comprising, a pipe adapted to receive and convey loose material under airflow from a blower, a hood assembly mounted on the end of the pipe remote from the blower, means journaling the hood assembly for rotative movement on the end of the pipe, motor means mounted on the hood assembly, means including a drive means having a pin driven in an orbital path connected to the motor means and a plate slidably mounting the pin and carried by the end of the pipe to rotate the hood assembly through limited pivotal movement to either side of a reference position on the end of said pipe, said hood assembly including a plurality of pivotally connected sections to deflect material flow therethrough, lever means carried by the hood assembly and connected to the hood sec tions to pivot the same through a predetermined range of pivotal movement to variably deflect material from said pipe, additional drive means including a second pin driven in an oblong path and connected to said motor means and a link connected to the lever means to transmit oblong movement of the second pin into linear reciprocating motion to the lever means to pivot the hood sections, said motor means effecting limited pivotal movement of the hood assembly and reciprocating pivotal motion of the hood sections simultaneously, and additional motor means carried on the hood assembly and connected to the additional drive means for adjustably positioning the additional drive means relative to the first named drive means to shift the position of the oblong movement of the second pin and the linear motion of the lever means relative thereto and hence adjustably position the range of pivoting of the hood sections relative to the end of the pipe.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3985394 *Apr 7, 1975Oct 12, 1976Deere & CompanyTractor-implement control system
US4005565 *Aug 15, 1975Feb 1, 1977Deere & CompanyStack wagon
Classifications
U.S. Classification406/158, 406/162
International ClassificationA01D90/00, A01D87/00
Cooperative ClassificationA01D90/00, A01D87/0046
European ClassificationA01D87/00K, A01D90/00
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Nov 28, 1986ASAssignment
Owner name: GEHL COMPANY, A CORP. OF WISCONSIN
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:OWATONNA MANUFACTURING COMPANY, INC., A CORP. OF MN;REEL/FRAME:004647/0375
Effective date: 19861010