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Publication numberUS3793851 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 26, 1974
Filing dateMay 19, 1972
Priority dateMay 19, 1972
Also published asCA972980A1
Publication numberUS 3793851 A, US 3793851A, US-A-3793851, US3793851 A, US3793851A
InventorsThorneburg J
Original AssigneeThorneburg Hosiery Mills Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Boot sock
US 3793851 A
Abstract
This sock is particularly adapted for use with western type boots in which the heel portion is enlarged to a greater extent than the heels of regular boots and shoes. The entire length of the leg, foot and heel portions of this sock are knit of one or more body yarns and a main terry yarn forms terry loops throughout either the entire inner surface of the sock or at least in the heel. An auxiliary terry yarn is knit in plated relationship with the main terry yarn in at least the heel portion and may be knit in the adjacent areas above and below the heel portion and forms additional terry loops to provide additional fabric thickness in the heel and adjacent areas so that the heel portion of the sock fills in the enlarged heel of the western boot. The yarns forming the terry loops are hydrophobic to wick any moisture from the inside of the sock and away from the foot of the wearer.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

[ Feb. 26, 1974 BOOT SOCK Primary Examiner-Ronald Feldbaum Inventor:

James L. Thorneburg, Statesville, NC.

Assignee: Thorneburg Hosiery Mills, Inc.,

[57] ABSTRACT This sock is particularly adapted for use with western Statesville, NC. i

type boots in which the heel portion 15 enlarged to a Filedi 19, 1972 greater extent than the heels of regular boots and [21] Appl 255,095 shoes. The entire length of the leg, foot and heel portions of this sock are knit of one or more body yarns and a main terry yarn forms terry loops throughout either the entire inner surface of the sock or at least in the heel. An auxiliary terry yarn is knit in plated relationship with the main terry yarn in at least the heel portion and may be knit in the adjacent areas above and below the heel portion and forms additional terry References Cited loops to provide additional fabric thickness in the heel UNITED STATES PATENTS and adjacent areas so that the heel portion of the sock fills in the enlarged heel of the western boot. The yarns forming the terry loops are hydrophobic to wick any moisture from the inside of the sock and away from the foot of the wearer.

.. 66/194 X 66/185 X 66/186 X FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS B1rd Davis Shea 568,560 12/1958 66/194 7 Claims, 3 w ng Figures BOOT SOCK This invention relates to a seamless knit sock particularly adapted for use with western type boots and including additional fabric thickness in the heel pocket and surrounding areas so that the heel portion tends to fill in the enlarged heel of the western boot and provide a more comfortable fit for the wearer than socks which do not include the additional fabric thickness provided by the additional terry loops in the sock of the present invention.

It is generally known to provide terry loops on the inner surface of various types of socks, particularly those socks referred to as sweat socks. This type of sock is used in various active participator sports and the terry loops provide a cushion for the foot of the wearer, provide thermal insulating properties and may provide a means for wicking any perspiration away from the foot of the wearer.

With the foregoing in mind, it is an object of the present invention to provide a boot sock particularly adapted for use with western type boots wherein terry loops are formed of a main terry yarn extending throughout the entire length of the leg, heel and foot portions, or at least in the heel of the sock and an auxiliary terry yarn is knit in plated relationship with the main terry yarn in at least the heel portion to form additional terry loops to provide additional fabric thickness in the heel portion so that the thickened heel portion tends to fill in the enlarged heel of the western boot and provide a more comfortable fit for the wearer.

In accordance with this invention, the leg, heel and foot portions of the sock are knit of elastic and inelastic body yarns which are plated during the knitting operation. The inelastic yarn is hydrophilic to absorb moisture and the elastic yarn is hydrophobic. The main and auxiliary terry yarns, wick moisture from the foot to the outer layer of the sock. The auxiliary terry yarn is also preferably knit in plated relationship with the main terry yarn in the high spliced area extending across and above the heel pocket and in a sole splice area extending across and below the heel pocket. The auxiliary terry yarn forms terry loops in these areas above and below the heel pocket and is incorporated on the inside of the sock. The auxiliary terry yarn is introduced and withdrawn and cut adjacent opposite side edges of the high splice and sole splice areas to provide loose ends of yarn on the inside of the sock.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will appear as the description proceeds, when taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which;

FIG. 1 is a side elevational view of the sock of the present invention, turned inside out from the position in which it is worn;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged fragmentary isometric view of that small portion of the sock enclosed by the dotted rectangle 2 in FIG. 1 and illustrating the manner in which the additional terry yarn is incorporated in the sock; and

FIG. 3 is an enlarged vertical sectional view taken substantially along the line 33 in FIG. 2.

The sock illustrated in FIG. 1 is preferably knit on a circular hosiery knitting machine and includes an upper rib knit cuff 10, a leg portion 11, a heel pocket 12, a foot portion 13, and a toe pocket 14 which is closed by a line of looping or stitching, indicated at 15. A high splice area 16 extends substantially one-half the distance around the leg portion 11 and is centered above the heel pocket 12. A sole splice area 17 extends substantially one-half the distance around the foot portion 13 and is centered below the heel pocket 12. Although the relative sizes of the high splice area 16 and the sole splice area 17 may be varied as desired, it is preferred that the height of the high splice area be approximately three times the height of the sole splice area 17. In the present instance, the flattened sock is approximately 4% inches from one side to the other and the high splice area 16 extends upwardly a length of 3% inches while the length of the sole splice area 17 extends approximately 1 inch below the heel pocket 12.

In the leg portion 11 complete courses of stitch loops are formed of one or more body yarns, indicated at B-1 and B-2 in FIGS. 2 and 3. A main terry yarn, indicated at T-l, is knit in plated relationship with the body yarn and is illustrated as forming terry loops in the sinker wales throughout the inner surface of the leg 11. The main terry yarn T-l also forms terry loops in the heel pocket 12, sole splice area 17, foot 13 and toe pocket 14. An auxiliary terry yarn T-2 is knit in plated relationship with the main terry yarn T-l and the body yarns in the high splice area 16, the heel pocket 12, and the sole splice area 17 to form additional terry loops and to provide additional fabric thickness in these areas.

The main terry yarn T-l and the auxiliary yarn T-2 are hydrophobic and preferably formed of acrylic fibers, such as Orlon. The body yarn B-l is hydrophobic and is preferably a textured nylon which has been twisted or crimped to make it stretchable or elastic while the body yarn B-2 is hydrophilic and is preferably formed of natural fibers, such as cotton or wool. During the knitting of the sock, the yarns are plated so that the stretchable nylon body yarn B1 is maintained outside of the cotton body yarn 8-2. The outer nylon yarn 8-] thus protects the inner cotton body yarn 8-2 against wear. The terry loops of the terry yarns T-l and T-2 (hydrophobic) are maintained on the inside of the sock so that any moisture or perspiration from the foot of the wearer will be wicked to the outside and away from the foot of the wearer. Also, the stretchable nylon body yarn B-l maintains the sock against the foot of the wearer and provides sufficient stretch that the sock will fit a range of foot sizes.

The sock illustrated in FIG. 1 is knit on a circular hosiery knitting machine, and is preferably knit from the top to the toe. The usual make-up courses are first formed on both the cylinder and dial needles and the ribbed cuff portion 10 is then knit with the elastic nylon body yarn B-1 and inelastic cotton body yarn B-2 being knit in plated relationship.

Upon completion of the desired length of ribbed cuff portion 10, the leg 11 is knit on the cylinder needles only and knit of the body yarns B-1 and B-2 while the main terry yarn T-l is knit in plated relationship therewith and terry loops are formed in the sinker wales on the inside of the leg portion 1 1. At the upper end of the high splice area 16, the auxiliary terry yarn T-2 is introduced and knit in plated relationship with the main terry yarn T-2 and in those needle wales extending substantially one-half the distance around the sock and above the heel 12. The knitting of the auxiliary yarn T-2 in this area is accomplished by feeding this yam to only those needles in that half of the needle cylinder which knit the heel pocket by means of a chopper feed finger. The auxiliary yarn T-2 is floated inside of the needles which knit the front half of the sock and passes over a dial plate which is provided with a cutter to automatically cut and clamp the yarn end extending from the last active or knitting needle. This yarn end is held until it is picked up and withdrawn by the first active needle in the next course to leave loose yarn ends extending inwardly of the sock and along opposite sides of the high splice area 16. These loose or cut ends of the yarn T-2 are indicated at E in FIGS. 1 and 2.

During the knitting of the heel pocket 12, the needle cylinder reciprocates in the usual manner and the number of needles knitting is gradually decreased in the upper portion of the heel pocket. The number of needles knitting is then increased in the lower portion of the heel pocket to form a gore line, indicated at 19 in FIG. 1. During the knitting of the heel pocket 12, both body yarns B-1 and B-2 as well as both terry yarns T-l and T-2 are fed to all of the active needles and terry loops are formed of both terry yarns. As is well known, the needles which form the instep or front portion of the sock hold the stitch loops of the corresponding part of the last full cores in the leg portion 11 until completion of the knitting of the heel pocket 12.

Upon completion of the knitting of the heel pocket 12, the needle cylinder again rotates and full courses are knit in the foot portion 13 with the body yarns B-l, B-2 and the main terry yarn T-l being fed to and knit on all needles while the auxiliary terry yarn T2 is fed to and knit on those needles which formed the heel pocket to provide additional terry loops in the sole splice portion 17. Again, the auxiliary terry yarn T-2 is introduced and withdrawn from knitting position and cut to form loose ends E at opposite sides of the sole splice area 17. Upon completion of the knitting of the sole splice area 17, the auxiliary terry yarn T-2 is withdrawn and the foot portion 13 and toe pocket 14 are knit of the yarns B-l, B-2, and T-l. The toe pocket 14 is formed in the usual manner with reciprocation of the needle cylinder and the toe pocket is closed by the line of looping or stitching 15.

Thus, the additional thickness in the heel pocket 12 and in the adjacent high splice area 16 and sole splice area 17 is provided by the additional terry loops formed of the auxiliary terry yarn T-2. When a western type boot is worn with this sock, this additional thickness of fabric in the heel area tends to fill in the enlarged heel of the western boot and provides a more comfortable fit to the wearer.

Although the sock of the present invention has been illustrated and described as having terry loops, knit of the main terry yarn T-l, extending throughout the entire length of the leg 11, high splice 16, heel l2, sole splice area 17, foot 13 and toe 14, it is only necessary that the terry loops knit of the main terry yarn T-l be formed in at least the heel pocket 12. If desired, the main terry loops may extend throughout the toe pocket 14, along the entire length of the lower sole portion of the foot 13, and throughout the heel pocket 12. Also, the main terry loops may be provided in the high splice area 16. The additional terry loops, formed of the terry yarn T-2, may be provided only in the heel pocket 12.

The additional terry loops may also be provided in the high splice area 16, or the auxiliary terry loops may be formed in the heel pocket 12 and the sole splice area 17. In any case, the provision of main terry loops and auxiliary terry loops in the heel area of the sock will provide additional fabric thickness in the heel area so that this area of the sock more completely fills in the enlarged heel of a western boot to provide a more comfortable fit to the wearer.

In the drawings and specification, there has been set forth a preferred embodiment of the invention, and although specific terms are employed, they are used in a generic and descriptive sense only and not for purposes of limitation.

That which is claimed is:

1. A seamless knitted sock particularly adapted for use with western type boots comprising leg, heel and foot portions knit throughout of body yarn, a main terry yarn forming terry loops throughout the inner surface of said leg, heel and foot portion and an auxiliary terry yarn knit in plated relationship with said main terry yarn in said heel portion and forming additional terry loops to provide additional fabric thickness in said heel portion so that said heel portion tends to fill in the enlarged heel of a western boot.

2. A sock according to claim 1 wherein said leg includes a high splice area extending substantially onehalf the distance around said leg and being centered above said heel portion, and wherein said auxiliary terry yarn is also knit in plated relationship with said main terry yarn in said high splice area and forms additional terry loops to provide additional fabric thickness in said high splice area.

3. A sock according to claim 2 wherein said auxiliary terry yarn is cut to provide loose ends on the inside of said sock and along opposite sides of said high splice area.

4. A sock according to claim 2 wherein said foot includes a sole splice area extending substantially onehalf the distance around said foot and being centered below said heel portion, and wherein said auxiliary terry yarn is knit in plated relationship with said main terry yarn in said sole splice area and forms additional terry loops to provide additional fabric thickness in said sole splice area.

5. A sock according to claim 4 wherein said auxiliary terry yarn is cut to provide loose ends on the inside of said sock and along opposite sides of said sole splice area.

6. A sock according to claim 4 wherein the height of said high splice area is approximately three times the height of said sole splice area.

7. A sock according to claim 1 wherein said leg, heel and foot portions are knit throughout of an elastic body yarn and an inelastic body yarn knit in plated relationship and wherein said inelastic body yarn is hydrophilic and said main and auxiliary terry yarns are hydrophobic to wick perspiration away from the foot of the wearer and to the outside of the sock where it is absorbed by said inelastic body yarn and held away from the foot of the wearer.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2144563 *Dec 5, 1936Jan 17, 1939W B Davis & Son IncStocking
US2436904 *Jul 19, 1945Mar 2, 1948Bear Brand Hoslery CoKnitting machine
US3250095 *Oct 1, 1964May 10, 1966Alamance Ind IncSock for active participator sports
BE568560A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3995322 *Mar 22, 1976Dec 7, 1976Wigwam Mills, Inc.Cushion top sock
US4104892 *Nov 15, 1976Aug 8, 1978Thorneburg Hosiery Mill, Inc.Cushioned sole tube sock and method
US4253317 *Apr 26, 1979Mar 3, 1981Burlington Industries, Inc.Sock construction
US4255949 *Aug 16, 1979Mar 17, 1981Thorneburg James LAthletic socks with integrally knit arch cushion
US4263793 *Apr 2, 1979Apr 28, 1981Kayser-Roth Hosiery, Inc.Dress weight tube sock
US4277959 *Mar 24, 1980Jul 14, 1981Thorneburg James LSocks with integrally knit cushions in heel, arch and ball
US4284507 *May 9, 1979Aug 18, 1981Beane Frank ThomasKnit pile filter
US4341096 *Aug 6, 1980Jul 27, 1982Kayser-Roth Hosiery, Inc.Sock with triple layer fabric in foot and method
US4373361 *Apr 13, 1981Feb 15, 1983Thorneburg James LSki sock with integrally knit thickened fabric areas
US4422307 *May 24, 1982Dec 27, 1983Thorneburg James LSock
US4732015 *Oct 23, 1985Mar 22, 1988American Doubloon CorporationKnitted article
US4898007 *Nov 16, 1987Feb 6, 1990Dahlgren Ray EMoisture management sock
US5131099 *Oct 23, 1991Jul 21, 1992Max ZellwegerSock and process for production thereof
US5307522 *Feb 7, 1992May 3, 1994James L. ThroneburgSnowboarding sock
US5335517 *Jul 23, 1993Aug 9, 1994James L. ThroneburgAnatomical isotonic sock and method of knitting the same
US5708985 *Nov 12, 1996Jan 20, 1998Ogden & Company, Inc.Enhanced frictional engagement sock
US5771495 *Jan 8, 1996Jun 30, 1998The Burton CorporationSnowboarding sock
US5784721 *Aug 15, 1996Jul 28, 1998Wyoming WoolensPadded fleece sock and method of making same
US6032295 *May 12, 1999Mar 7, 2000Marshall; James B.Moisture-absorbent sock
US6230525 *May 4, 2000May 15, 2001Albert Ray DunlapSock with impact absorbing sole and method
US6308337 *Mar 12, 2001Oct 30, 2001Neuville Industries, Inc.Blister protection mohair sock
US6735988Mar 27, 2002May 18, 2004Honeycutt Larry WCotton footie and stocking
US7552603Jun 19, 2008Jun 30, 2009Dahlgren Footwear, Inc.Channeled moisture management sock
US20110131706 *Dec 1, 2010Jun 9, 2011NoCut I Sverige ABSports sock
EP0015119A1 *Feb 13, 1980Sep 3, 1980Thorneburg Hosiery Co., Inc.Jogging and running athletic sock
EP0062969A2 *Mar 12, 1982Oct 20, 1982Thorneburg Hosiery Co., Inc.Ski sock with integrally knit thickened fabric areas
EP1538246A1 *Dec 2, 2004Jun 8, 2005Falke KgLeg garment
EP2613657A2 *Sep 5, 2011Jul 17, 2013Delta Galil Industries Ltd.Socks, and system and method for manufacturing socks
WO1995002972A1 *May 4, 1994Feb 2, 1995James L ThroneburgCushioning sock and method of knitting same
Classifications
U.S. Classification66/185, 66/187, 66/194
International ClassificationD04B9/00, D04B1/22, D04B1/26, D04B9/46
Cooperative ClassificationD04B1/26
European ClassificationD04B1/26
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jun 17, 1983AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: THORNEBURG HOSIERY CO., INC. A NC CORP.
Effective date: 19830427
Owner name: THORNEBURG, JAMES L. P.O. BOX 503, 629 NORTH RACE
Jun 17, 1983ASAssignment
Owner name: THORNEBURG, JAMES L. P.O. BOX 503, 629 NORTH RACE
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:THORNEBURG HOSIERY CO., INC. A NC CORP.;REEL/FRAME:004141/0242
Effective date: 19830427